British Landscapes Photography
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British Landscapes Photography
"celebrating the landscapes of the British Isles through photography"
Curated by Derek Fogg
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Wales 2018 - Year of the Sea

Wales 2018 - Year of the Sea | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
In 2018 #Wales is celebrating it's outstanding coastline. This is the Year of the Sea. The 870-mile Wales Coast Path runs the whole length of the coastline: the first continuous coastal path of any country in the world. It passes through seascapes of breath-taking variety, from flat wetlands to towering cliffs, feat
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British Isles | United Kingdom British Landscapes Photography

British Isles | United Kingdom British Landscapes Photography | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Specialising in British Landscapes Photography Derek's work includes National Parks & Heritage Coasts & everything in between.
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Favourite Ten from Ten Years on the Road

Favourite Ten from Ten Years on the Road | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
It's that time of year again when most photographers share their favourite images from the past year but disappointingly I haven't got any images to share because for the first time for many years for one reason or another I haven't been out with my camera. Maybe I have hit that "wall" and lost some of the enthusiasm that I had when I first started and now a little over ten years on from the start of my photo road trips around the British Isles there seems to be less locations that I want to visit and photograph. Whilst I dont mind returning to previously visited locations I always have the need to seek out new journeys. I think it must be something of the Phileas Fogg in me. I did have one big trip in mind but that unfortunately did not materialise as I had not completed the location planning and if there is one thing that you must have completed it is that otherwise you could be just driving around aimlessly, but it is not forgotten and I am hopeful that it will take place in 2018 along with other locations I may decide to visit.
So not having anything to share with you for 2017 I came up with the idea of sharing my favourite images from each year over the last ten years starting in 2007 when I had trips to Cornwall, Gower, Pembrokeshire and Scotland. For this year I have decided that Three Cliffs bay on Gower is my favourite. My first and only visit to our first Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. This must surely be one of the most beautiful bays in Britain. It has a wide mouth into which the massive form of Three Cliffs Rock juts from the eastern shore.



The Outer Hebrides or the Western Isles was my only trip in 2008 and it turned out to be one of the most memorable trips I have made. Two weeks covering from the top on the Isle of Lewis to the bottom on the Isle of Barra and I couldn't have picked a better time with mainly beautiful weather throughout my visit
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Britain's Wonderful Wrecks - Part 2

Britain's Wonderful Wrecks - Part 2 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Doesn't time fly. You may recall that a while back I wrote about some of the boat wrecks I had come across on my photo trips and I promised you more; well almost eight months on here they are starting with some from Scotland. The first is at Ardgour which lies south west of Fort William on the west bank of Loch Linnhe situated at the Corran Narrows on the eastern side of the Ardnamurchan Peninsula. Ardgour, it's name in the Gaelic translates as "Height Of The Goat" was part of the ancient trade route to the Inner Hebrides, the original "Road To The Isles". I was passing Ardgour on my way through the Ardnamurchan Peninsula and came across "Capri" beached on the shore. Its a fishing boat that was built in Sweden in 1949 and now lies abandoned some 60 years later.



Staying on the west coast of Scotland in Wester Ross we visit Badachro (Gaelic Bad a' Chrodha) meaning cattle fold clump. A remote fishing village about 2 miles south of Gairloch. It is idyllically situated on an inlet of Loch Gairloch. Sheltered by several islands the bay provides a safe anchorage for fishing boats and yachts. At the end of the nineteenth century Badachro was a busy fishing centre. Fish, in particular cod, landed here and at Gairloch, was dried at Badachro. There were two curing stations - one on Eilean Horrisdale and one on Eilean Tioram. Lobsters, crabs and prawns are still landed here and sent to the markets both in the south and in Europe. There are many abandoned boats in this location but this is one I have not been able to identify but couldn't resist capturing it with that wonderful backdrop.



We now move over to the Isle of Mull where if you recall we visited Croig in the Historic Harbours article. Close by Croig is the abandoned "Branch". The trawler was built in 1951 in Fraserburgh and used all round the coast of northern Scotland including being based at Barra in the Outer Hebrides
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Scotland's National Parks - Is this the Start of Something Big?

Scotland's National Parks - Is this the Start of Something Big? | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
In 2012 I published an article entitled Scotland - No more parks? which in the year that Scotland's first National Park Loch Lomond and the Trossachs celebrated its tenth anniversary I raised concerns that despite Scotland having landscapes that rank amongst the best in the world, including wild mountains, pristine rivers and lochs, ancient forests, stunning coastline and islands, all rich in wildlife and history there were still only two National Parks and there didn't appear to be any political will towards the further development; certainly the Scottish Government had no overall strategy. At the time a project was underway to promote a National Parks Strategy by a partnership between the Scottish Campaign for National Parks and the Association for the Protection for Rural Scotland. The aspiration was that this could result in at least three new National Parks being designated by 2015, including Scotland’s first coastal and marine National Park. The project was completed and a report published "Unfinished Business" which calls for at least seven more National Parks. They were Lochaber which includes Ben Nevis, Glencoe and Black Mount, a coastal and marine National Park, centred around the Isle of Mull, The Cheviots as an extension of the Northumberland National Park, Galloway, Glen Affric, Isle of Harris and Wester Ross.
Another two years on and nothing further as happened but now Argyll and Bute Council has indicated their interest in exploring the possibility of a National Park by including a statement of support in it's local development plans to seek views on whether the council should, or should not, actively explore the potential for a National Park in the future. The area stretching from the tiny islands of Tiree and Coll all the way to the west Kintyre coast which will cover an area of roughly 2650 square miles, would become the UK’s largest National Park
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Exploring Norfolk's Windmills

Exploring Norfolk's Windmills | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
After a week of typically autumnal weather – with foggy nights, pleasant sunshine and periods of wind and rain a more unsettled spell of weather looks likely with the remnants of the recent tropical systems likely to impact our weather towards the end of the weekend and into the beginning of next week.
This as made me recall the many windmills and wind pumps that were in use in this country in the past and that are no longer in use today. One of the areas where there are many preserved windmills and wind pumps which are unique is the Norfolk Broads. The Norfolk Broads is one of England's ten National Parks and is Britain's magical waterland, a uniquely beautiful environment shaped by people working hand in hand with nature over thousands of years. The windmills of Norfolk are perhaps the most iconic of all the county's landscape features. Scattered across the county they stand as sentinels to a distant industrial past in which they provided wind-driven power for milling and for draining the marshland. In the nineteenth century at their peak there were around 700 working windmills in Norfolk and those that survive are important for having played their part in how the Norfolk landscape looks today. The best known of these survivors are the windmills of the Norfolk Broads. We are going to take a look at four mills the first being in Thurne, a small riverside Broadland village that either gives or takes its name from the River Thurne that flows directly by the village located at the end of a dyke with the famous Thurne drainage mill at its head. The mill was built in 1820, but the sails and cap were blown off in 1919 and it needed repair. At some stage, the mill has been highered and this gives the "waist", as the new section was made round to allow the cap to be re-used.



Moving on we now visit Brograve Mill, a windpump located on Brograve level in the parish of Sea Palling
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Isle of Arran - Scotland in Miniature

Isle of Arran - Scotland in Miniature | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
During a review of my portfolio to see what areas of the country I hadn't written about I was surprised to find that the Isle of Arran as either not been included at all or very rarely. So here we go. Described by many as ʻScotland in Miniatureʼ, Arran truly is the best of the mainland compressed into an island 20 miles long and 10 miles wide. As well as stunning landscapes amongst other things you will find pretty villages, ancient castles and prehistoric standing stones. I have only visited the island once for a few days on my way to Islay via Arran and Kintyre although I did manage to circumnavigate the island during those few days. I thought we would start off with a distant view of Arran captured from Skipness on the north west coast of the Kintyre Peninsula.



Two of the more distinctive and well known locations on the island are Holy Island and Machrie Moor. Firstly Holy Island which lies of the east coast of Arran and has been owned by Buddhists since 1992 where they have established a meditative retreat and since 2003 a Peace Centre. The earliest recorded name for Holy Island was Inis Shroin, which is old Gaelic for 'Island of the Water Spirit'. After the time when the Celtic Christian saint St. Molaise lived on the island at the end of the 6th century, it became known as Eilean Molaise, which is Gaelic for 'Molaise's Island'. This name gradually evolved over the course of centuries until early in the 19th century the island became generally known as Holy Isle and the village on the other side of the bay became known as Lamlash.



On the west coast of the island lies a windswept and mystical peat bog called Machrie Moor. Bronze Age stone circles and standing stones are strewn across its barren, undulating terrain. One of the stone circles is known as Fingal's Cauldron Seat, where sits a stone with a carved hole. The legendary warrior giant Fingal is said to have tethered his favourite dog Bran to this stone
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Britain's Beautiful Castles - Part 2

Britain's Beautiful Castles - Part 2 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
It's almost six months since the first part in the series on Britain's Beautiful Castles and seeing as it seems to have been a popular topic I thought I would take you on another trip to see a few more. I'll start in north east England on Holy island and Lindsfarne Castle. Sited atop the volcanic mound known as Beblowe Crag, Lindisfarne Castle is one of the most distinct and picturesque features of Holy Island and can be seen from many miles around. The castle was built in the 1550's using stones from the demolished Priory and in 1901 it was purchased and created into the Edwardian country house you see today.



Across the border now into Scotland and over on my favourite west coast we find Castle Stalker. Built around 1540 by Duncan Stewart of Appin, it was gifted by him to James IV for use as a hunting lodge. In fact, its Gaelic name Caisteal Stalcair translates literally as 'Castle of the Hunter'. It sits at the mouth of Loch Laich, by Loch Linnhe on a rocky islet known as the Rock of the Cormorants which is also the battle cry of the Stewarts of Appin. In the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Castle Stalker appeared as Castle Aaaargh.



Still in Scotland and over to the wonderful Western Isles or the Outer Hebrides and the Isle of Barra in particular. Kisimul (or Caisteal Chiosmuil) Castle sits on a rocky islet in the bay just off the coast of in Castlebay. Legend has it that this has been the stronghold of the MacNeils since the 11th century. The castle gets its name from the Gaelic words cios, (tax or tribute) and mul (mound), meaning "The place where taxes are paid."



Travelling right down the coast to South Wales and Pennard Castle. Pennard Castle's situation is dramatic and beautiful. It is perched on the edge of the valley of the Pennard Pill, with a sheer drop below to the north and west. From it there is a sweeping view out towards Three Cliffs Bay, and across the valley to Penmaen Burrows
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Dungeness – Wild, Weird and Wonderful

Dungeness – Wild, Weird and Wonderful | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Dungeness has a very unusual landscape with one of the largest expanses of shingle in the world at the end of a mile and a half promontory, between New Romney, Lydd and Camber on Romney Marsh in Kent. As well as being a National Nature Reserve, a Special Area of Conservation and a Site of Special Scientific Interest the shingle expanse at Dungeness is so large that it has been called Britain's only desert - although according to the Met Office, it receives an average of 700mm of rain a year, so cannot be formally classified as a desert.
The Dungeness Estate is owned by EDF Energy, the French company that owns the Dungeness B nuclear power plant next door. Each year more and more shingle is deposited on the shore, so Dungeness, unlike a great deal of the rest of the coast, is actually getting bigger until that is EDF started to move shingle along the beach in order to protect the power station from flooding.



Having seen the view above you may all be saying what a mess and what's all the fuss about. Well Dungeness is a varied landscape of international scientific and environmental importance. A remarkable and unique variety of wildlife lives at Dungeness, including more than 600 different types of plant, a third of all those found in Britain. It is one of the best places in Britain to find insects such as moths, bees, beetles and spiders — many of which are very rare. Some aren't to be found anywhere else in Britain.



It's not just its environmental credentials that make this place fascinating though... The world's first submarine oil pipelines were laid between Dungeness and France during the second world war as part of Operation Pluto... Guglielmo Marconi, the inventor of radio, conducted his tests in Dungeness in 1899, becoming the first person to transmit radio messages across the English Channel
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Britain's Sacred Sites

Britain's Sacred Sites | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Britain is scattered with sacred sites from the outlying islands off North Scotland to the far south of Cornwall. Our ancestors saw something special in certain parts of the land and deemed them more sacred than others. People are still drawn back to these places today and the belief and ritual that surround them. So what places did they deem more sacred than others and why are they so special? This time we are going to visit just four of these sites starting with one of the holy islands - Iona off the west coast of Scotland.



St Columba, the man credited with converting the Scottish Gaels to Christianity, fled or was driven out of Ireland in 563 AD. He attended the inauguration of King Aedan mac Gabhrain in 574 and for his efforts was awarded the island of Iona. A visit to Iona nowadays is all it takes to make a person understand why the place might have appealed to those early Christians. The island is undoubtedly a place of quiet peace. Whatever the weather the landscape is beautiful and restful to eye and heart. Religious belief is not required, Iona simply has the magic. Moving on we arrive in Glastonbury, Somerset now also famous for its Summer music festival which will with us in just a few weeks time.



The Tor itself is captivating, rising abruptly from a level plain which in ancient times at least, was flooded by the sea. It was for this reason that followers of the Arthur legend allowed themselves to see the Tor as Avalon, the island to which the king was carried so that he might recover from wounds suffered while fighting Mordred. Other folk myths have Joseph of Arimathea arrive at Glastonbury with his nephew Jesus Christ and the Holy Grail. His staff is supposed to have taken root as the Glastonbury thorn - that flowers at Christmas time - and the grail itself is said to be buried nearby
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Britain's Wonderful Wrecks

Britain's Wonderful Wrecks | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
In the Autumn of last year I published an article on Britain's Historic Harbours and following on from that I thought it worth taking a look at some of the more notable boat wrecks I have discovered on my journey round the British Isles. The wrecks usually provide a really good focal point with plenty of character and if you are lucky, also in some wonderful coastal scenery. Of the four locations I'm recalling two are in Scotland and one each in England and Wales. We'll start in Scotland on the Isle of Mull and certainly the most photographed wrecks on the island if not in the whole of Scotland. On the east coast of the island on the Sound of Mull is the village of Salen, approximately halfway between Craignure and Tobermory. The full name of the settlement is 'Sàilean Dubh Chaluim Chille' (the black little bay of St Columba). Nearly all of the boats names are no longer visible but after some research I have established one of is called "Girl Claire" The others being "Pavonia" and "Elsie May" hence the title of the image.



On another of the Scottish islands - Islay I discovered the wreck of the trawler "Wyre Majestic". She ran ashore on passage from Oban close to the Bunnahabhain Distillery. The rusting remains, visible in the middle right of the image still sit resting on the rocks, across the Sound from the Paps of Jura. The area in and around the Sound of Islay is a notorious graveyard of ships with over 50 wrecks catalogued. There are strong rips and currents that boil through the narrow sound and these have caught many vessels unawares.




Moving on now to the south east corner of England in Kent and the wonderfully strange landscape of Dungeness which is at the end of a mile and a half shingle promontory, between New Romney, Lydd and Camber on Romney Marsh. Motor fishing boat "Tina" lies on the beach and is a long way from the shoreline, which through a natural phenomenon known as Long Shore Drift, is now about 700 yards away
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Print of the Month - April 2017

Print of the Month - April 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
At the foot of Yr Eifl, the tallest hills on the Llyn Peninsula in North Wales, lies the village of Trefor, which owes its very existence to the quarries on the hills above it. Granite from Yr Eifl quarry has been used to make Olympic Curling Stones, as well as many curb stones in the larger towns and cities of England and Wales.
Views from Yr Eifl, on a clear day, extend to Ireland, the whole of Cardigan Bay, Anglesey, Snowdonia, and the northern mountains of England. The centre peak, and tallest at 1,850, is called Garn Ganol; the most seaward, and smallest peak, is Garn For, which is home to the quarry.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of April. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code APR17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBAPR17 before completing the purchase. If "Trefor - Llyn Peninsula" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
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Britain's Beautiful Castles

Britain's Beautiful Castles | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Britain's turbulent civil history has left it with a magnificent legacy of castles, built to intimidate and designed for defence, many now in ruin yet they continue to hold their auras of power and mystery. These imposing structures still dominate many areas of the British landscape. Some are large, famous and easy to find, while others are almost forgotten ruins. On my photo trips capturing castle images as not been a priority however there has been a number of occasions where I have come across castles that appear to be such an integral part of the landscape that I felt compelled to record my visit to the location. Many of the castles are well known but others are less so but they all help to create a fine landscape view. We start off in Scotland on the Kintyre peninsula.



Skipness Castle stands on the east side of the Kintyre peninsula with wonderful views over to the Isle of Arran, seen in the background. First construction was in the early 1200s by the MacSweens, with many later additions and fortifications in the 13th, 14th and 16th centuries, eventually being abandoned in the 17th century. In the late 1200s or early 1300s Kilbrannan Chapel (St Brendan's Chapel) was constructed on the nearby shoreline. There are a number of ancient burial slabs in the surrounding graveyard. Moving further up the west coast of Scotland 25 miles north of Oban lies Castle Stalker.



Built around 1540 by Duncan Stewart of Appin, it was gifted by him to James IV for use as a hunting lodge. In fact, its Gaelic name Caisteal Stalcair translates literally as 'Castle of the Hunter'. It sits at the mouth of Loch Laich (by Loch Linnhe) on a rocky islet known as the Rock of the Cormorants which is also the battle cry of the Stewarts of Appin. In the film Monty Python and the Holy Grail, Castle Stalker appeared as Castle Aaaargh. Now back south to two castles in England. Firstly on the north east coast in Northumberland we visit the village of Bamburgh
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British islands, off an island off an island

British islands, off an island off an island | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
With such an unusual title I will start by trying to explain exactly what I mean. Its easier if I start at the end of the title with the last mention of an island where I am referring to the UK mainland (which of course is an island) being England, Scotland and Wales. The second reference refers to an island off the
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Print of the Month - January 2018

Print of the Month - January 2018 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
2018 is the seventh year that I have been offering the Print of the Month Collection which means 72 of my prints have already been made available at the month long special price. Hopefully you will we pleased to know that I have many more in the pipeline which will keep us going for many more years to come.
Salen on the Sound of Mull on the east coast of the Isle of Mull is featured this time. The full name of the settlement is 'Sàilean Dubh Chaluim Chille' (the black little bay of St Columba). This location is one of the most photographed on the island and shows three old boats moored up on the foreshore, one of which is called "Girl Claire" The others being "Pavonia" and "Elsie May" hence the title "The Sisters of Claire" The image was captured a few years back so I am not sure that they all still remain. I was fortunate on my visit to be rewarded with some beautiful low light in the late afternoon which brought out some wonderful colours particularly on the side of the boats.



Dont' forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of January. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame. The default frame is "Confetti Black" which can be changed to one of your own choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code JAN18 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBJAN18 before completing the purchase
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Print of the Month - December 2017

Print of the Month - December 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
This time Print of the Month features one of the more unusually located churches that I have come across on my travels and I remember my visit so well. Although I could have parked closer to the church I took the decision to walk to it across the marsh only to be caught in a sudden passing storm so not only did I get drenched on my way there but it also made the approach to the church all the more difficult. You can probably see from the image that I was almost in the water to get the point of view which I thought best showed the setting of the church. Still you can see the weather eventually improved just long enough to allow me to capture this wonderful location.
Fairfield Church is dedicated to St Thomas a Becket. It is said that an Archbishop of Canterbury was journeying across the dangerous Romney Marsh, when he fell into one of the many ditches. He prayed to St.Thomas, as he came up for the second time, for a miracle to save him from a watery death. Just in time a farmer arrived to save him, and in gratitude the Archbishop had the little church built and dedicated to St Thomas a Becket. The present church is a 15th century timber framed building, which was only clad in brick in the 18th century. The church is approached by a grass causeway built in 1913. Beforehand the parishioners had to row across in a boat to reach the church for a service.



Dont' forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of December. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame. The default frame is "Confetti Black" which can be changed to one of your own choice
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Print of the Month - November 2017

Print of the Month - November 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
This month I am offering a print that I must confess I thought I had already made available in the Collection. It features the cliffs at Hunstanton on the North Norfolk coast which make a spectacular view. In all my travels around the British Isles I have never come across a similar or such an an eye catching cliff formation. They show an amazing slice of Britain's history and originate from just after the Jurassic period. This makes them 100 million years old and some of the oldest rocks visible in East Anglia.



Dont' forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of November. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code NOV17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBNOV17 before completing the purchase. If "Hunstanton Cliffs" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
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Print of the Month - October 2017

Print of the Month - October 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
For this month's print we are back in Wales. To be more precise Pembrokeshire, the home to the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park, the only coastal national park of its kind in the United Kingdom and one of three national parks in Wales, the others being Snowdonia and Brecon Beacons national parks. Over the years Pembrokeshire's beaches have been awarded many International Blue Flag Awards, Green Coast Awards and Seaside Awards. In 2011 it had 39 beaches recommended by the Marine Conservation Society.
Barafundle Bay is a remote, slightly curved, east-facing sandy beach and is set between cliffs to the north and south; it marks the end of the carboniferous limestone cliffs of the Castlemartin peninsula to the south-west, and the beginning of the old red sandstone of Devonian age at Stackpole Quay to the north-east. In 2004, Barafundle Bay was included in a list of the Top 12 beaches in the world.



Dont' forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of October. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code OCT17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBOCT17 before completing the purchase. If "Barafundle Bay" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course
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Print of the Month - September 2017

Print of the Month - September 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Twelve months ago this month I was getting ready to set off on my North Coast 500 trip, which if you haven't already done so you can read all about by following the highlighted link. Without spoiling your reading of the highs and lows of the trip the North Coast 500 which launched in the Spring of 2015 is a 516 mile scenic route around the north coast of Scotland, starting and ending at Inverness.
One of the highlights of the trip came on Day One driving the "Bealach na Ba - Pass of the Cattle" which I have driven before but this will be the first time crossing from Kishorn. With a quick read of the warning signs I started to make my way up the Pass with clear weather and magnificent views. The Bealach is an unforgettable drive up and along one of the most dramatic roads on mainland UK. The road is single track ALL the way, and goes steadily uphill through a dramatic mix of mountain scenery to the summit at 2053 feet where I was rewarded with a jaw dropping view of the Cuillin Ridge on the Isle of Skye, Raasay and Rona which I am making available for Print of the Month.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of September. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code SEPT17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBSEPT17 before completing the purchase
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Print of the Month - August 2017

Print of the Month - August 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
This month we are just off the south coast on England's largest island, the Isle of Wight at Tennyson Down.
Tennyson Down is a hill at the west end of the island just south of Totland. It is a grassy, whale-backed ridge of chalk which rises to 482 feet above sea level and is named after the poet Lord Tennyson who lived at nearby Farringford House for nearly 40 years. The poet used to walk on the Down almost every day, saying that the air was worth 'sixpence a pint' and looking at the trees in this shot you can maybe understand what he meant.

At the top of the Down at a height of 147m stands a huge granite cross commemorating the life of Tennyson which you can just see in the background.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of August. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code AUG17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBAUG17 before completing the purchase. If "Tennyson Down" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
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Print of the Month - July 2017

Print of the Month - July 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
It's sometime since I included one of my "Intimate Landscapes" in Print of the Month so here goes with one from my North Coast 500 trip from last Autumn. During my research for the trip I came across comments on these wonderfully coloured pebbles so I decided to take a slight detour off the NC500 to search out the beach and I was not disappointed.
The tiny settlement of Littleferry lies on the northern shore of Loch Fleet, a large tidal basin with sand dunes, mudflats, coastal heath and pinewoods. Here you can see the old cottages that were once home to the ferryman and pilot, as well as buildings that served as an inn and stores for coal, salt and meal, all imported into the area by boat.
I keep viewing this photo either in portrait or landscape format, upside down and side to side and whichever way it is viewed it's composition just seems to work making it very versatile if you feel like a change of either orientation or placement it will be suitable for most locations. You could say you are getting 2, 3 or 4 prints for the price of one.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of July. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.

To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code JUL17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBJUL17 before completing the purchase
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Print of the Month - June 2017

Print of the Month - June 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it


It's a few months since I chose a print from Scotland so here's one from my 2014 trip to Galloway. Lying on Monreith Bay are the ruins of Kirkmaiden church, one of the oldest churches in Scotland, and the resting place of many of the McCulloch and Maxwell family members, who owned the Monreith estate. Above the church and overlooking the bay is the bronze otter commissioned by Galloway Wildlife Trust and sculptured by Penny Wheatley as a memorial to Gavin Maxwell 1914-1969 who spent his childhood years in the area. Maxwell, the author of the famous book "Ring of Bright Water", which was also made into a successful film was often seen exercising his tame otter, on the beach below Kirkmaiden church, when he returned to the area.


Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of June. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code JUN17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBJUN17 before completing the purchase. If "Monreith Bay" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.

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Print of the Month - May 2017

Print of the Month - May 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
Earlier this year I was pleased to find out that two of my images were to be featured on the 2017 National Trails Calendar. One was for the month of September and the month of May was to feature the image I am offering in May's Print of the Month. The image is also currently being used as the header for the National Trails Facebook page.
It is of course one of the iconic views of the Pembrokeshire Coast National Park showing the Elegug Stacks(Stack Rocks). Elegug is the poetic sounding Welsh word for the guillemot and not surprisingly these birds are very much in evidence here in nesting season, along with a whole host of other sea birds such as kittiwakes.
They are two pillars of limestone, a geographical feature caused naturally by the sea eroding weaknesses in the rock. They stand in the sea and are inaccessible from land – not least when the Ministry of Defence has closed off the nearby area to test tanks! When access can be gained, the birds can best be viewed from the mainland throughout the spring and early summer.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of May. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.
To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code MAY17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBMAY17 before completing the purchase
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Print of the Month - March 2017

Print of the Month - March 2017 | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
This month I am featuring a print from my tour of the North Devon Coast Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty at Hartland Point, a 325 foot high rocky outcrop of land on the north-western tip of the Devon coast. The point marks the western limit, on the English side, of the Bristol Channel with the Atlantic Ocean continuing to the west. This location was known to the Romans as the "Promontory of Hercules". The Hartland Point Lighthouse was built in 1874 under the direction of Sir James Douglass.



Don’t forget that that each image chosen will only be placed as Print of the Month once so if you like this particular image, buy it with 20% off the standard prices before the end of March. Even better Like my British Landscapes Photography Facebook Page and you can obtain 30% discount. There is a choice of an 18" by 12" print which is a perfect fit when mounted for 24" by 18" frames which are readily available via the internet or high street stores OR a 12" by 8" mounted print in a 16" by 12" frame of your choice.

To start or add to your collection just click on the image above and then select your choice of the two products listed, add to cart and then apply the Coupon Code MAR17 to obtain your 20% off the shown price at the checkout OR 30% having first Liked my Facebook page and applying the Code FBMAR17 before completing the purchase. If "Hartland Point" is not one of your preferred images then by all means please share with me your favourites and I will see if we can make them available in due course.
If you wish to be notified directly about new issues you can sign up for my free update on the Print of the Month Collection by clicking this link and entering your details.
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More Beautiful Lighthouses from around the British Coast

More Beautiful Lighthouses from around the British Coast | British Landscapes Photography | Scoop.it
My previous posts on Lighthouses around the British Coast have proved so popular that I have decided to share even more.
This time I am starting at Rattray Head historically Rattray Point, a headland in Buchan, Aberdeenshire. To the north lies Strathbeg Bay and Rattray Bay is to its south. The 120 foot Rattray Head lighthouse was built on the Ron Rock ("Ron" is the Gaelic for "seal"), part of the Rattray Briggs in 1895. It was built by the engineers and brothers David Alan Stevenson and Charles Alexander Stevenson. In February 1982 it became unmanned and self-working. The lighthouse is accessible by way of a causeway that is usually underwater being only visible at low tide. It is wide enough for a vehicle to cross.



Now for one that seems to have been forgotten in the other lighthouse posts. Still in Scotland but this time way out at the tip of the Ardnamurchan Peninsula, due west of Fort William. Its southern coast runs alongside Loch Sunart and the Sound of Mull. The northern coast looks towards the Hebridean islands of Skye, Muck, Eigg and Rhum. The coastlines meet at Ardnamurchan Point, the most westerly point on the British mainland. The granite tower soars 180 feet above the rocks, and was built in 1849 using granite from the Isle of Mull. Once again it was designed by Alan Stevenson, uncle of Robert Louis Stevenson, whose family designed most of Scotland’s lighthouses over a period of 150 years. It is the only lighthouse in the world designed in an “Egyptian“ style.



We will be back in Scotland shortly but here's one from my trip to North Devon. There has been a lighthouse at Bull Point since 1879, as a result of a series of shipwrecks on this length of coast. The present lighthouse was built in 1972. Bull Point features in the highly influential novel "Tarka the Otter" by Henry Williamson, first published in 1927 and having never been out of print since first publication
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