Brazil and the World Cup
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Brazil and the World Cup
This flashpoint centers around Brazil's hosting of the World Cup (Soccer) in July 2014. The expenses of hosting the cup, particularly constructing expensive stadiums, gave rise to protest in June 2013. This topic will track how the approach of the World Cup affects the political and economic climate of Brazil. It will also serve as a primer for understanding Brazil, one of the world's largest countries and an important emerging economic power.
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The Protests in Brazil, Explained

The Protests in Brazil, Explained | Brazil and the World Cup | Scoop.it
The protests raging in Brazil were sparked by a bus-fare hike, but they're about much more—including the Olympics.
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A good primer. Note: Mother Jones is a left-leaning publication.

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Brazil rocked by protests – in pictures

Brazil rocked by protests – in pictures | Brazil and the World Cup | Scoop.it
Demonstrations have erupted at the Confederations Cup in Brazil amid anger at the amount of public money being spent on the tournament and the forthcoming 2014 World Cup
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These pictures illustrate the recent protests.

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Professor Brook's comment, August 30, 2013 12:06 PM
Pictures from the June protests.
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Own goals

Own goals | Brazil and the World Cup | Scoop.it
UNTIL a couple of months ago polls suggested that Dilma Rousseff was one of the democratic world’s most popular leaders and was sailing towards a second term in a...
Professor Brook's insight:

Impact of protests and Brazil's leadership. Recent article.

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Brazil: With tensions high amid protests, soccer tournament goes on

Brazil: With tensions high amid protests, soccer tournament goes on | Brazil and the World Cup | Scoop.it
Brazil, rocked by recent nationwide protests, hosts two high-profile football games on Sunday in preparation for next year's World Cup.
Professor Brook's insight:

The protests did not stop an international soccer tournament in Brazil this summer.

 

Here is some basic information about the story (excerpted from the piece):

"The protests over the weekend are part of a movement that has brought together Brazilians angered by their government. Protesters say the government is falling short in its duties to its citizens while spending lavishly on events such as the 2014 World Cup and 2016 Olympic Games. While most of the protests have remained peaceful, there have been reports of sporadic violence, which has resulted in two deaths.

Public transportation fare hikes spurred the discontent weeks ago, but protests continued to escalate last week despite various state governments repealing the fare hikes."

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Professor Brook's comment, August 30, 2013 12:05 PM
This is from June.
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Brazil protests over World Cup costs spread nationwide

Tens of thousands of people took to the streets of major Brazilian cities Monday as protests spread against higher public transport costs and the billions of...
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Professor Brook's comment, August 30, 2013 12:05 PM
This is from June.
Professor Brook's comment, August 30, 2013 12:13 PM
Video.