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That Diner Feeling: How Denny's Became A Weirdly Successful Content Marketer

That Diner Feeling: How Denny's Became A Weirdly Successful Content Marketer | Brand | Scoop.it

Chief brand officer Frances Allen talks about Denny's content marketing success, how it manages its offbeat social media persona, and the five core principles driving it all.

 

When it comes to translating a marketing strategy, and a brand voice via real-time channels like Twitter, most marketers find it hard to get out of their own way--layers of approval, and the simple lack of understanding of what the brand voice even is, leads to banality, or worse. So how has Denny's, of all companies, managed to become a weird sort of beacon of content realness? Chief brand officer Frances Allen says the company’s strategy is an extension of five core principles of marketing, and it’s helped Denny's boost not only its cultural footprint but also its sales growth for 11 of the last 12 quarters.

Abbey Davis's insight:

Brand personality should be authentic, engaging, exciting and should pull you in and make you feel like you have a relationship with this brand like you would with a friend. Denny's has stepped outside the box and built a brand personality that is brash, bold and humorous and people love it. The interaction through social media is astounding. 

 

One thing that really stood out for me reading this article is how Denny's took a leap and strived to break through the noise and clutter by taking risks and being bold. 

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Brand Equity: Emotional Equity

Brand Equity: Emotional Equity | Brand | Scoop.it
When you strategize and deliver a brand underpinned by unexpected value, you change the emotional landscape that you compete in and you sidestep the cluttered, increasingly emotive middle ground that your commoditizing competitors are squabbling over. You also actively avoid re-plowing the deeply owned and highly branded field of another. That’s how you build market leadership. That’s how you continue to lift brand equity. By owning and fuelling emotions that are increasingly and delightfully associated with you.

Via Thomas Faltin
Abbey Davis's insight:

A brand that has strong competition must look for something that this brand doesn't provide it's consumers, a feeling or an emotion perhaps that consumers do not get from the competition. This is referred to as emotional equity. 

 

What can our brand do that other brands aren't doing which we can be great at?! Market leaders strategise and deliver a brand underpinned by unexpected value. 

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Sini Tagiloa's curator insight, August 10, 2014 4:34 AM

#BrandEquity, striking where it hurts when your competitors least expect it. This brings about #BrandPreference and builds #BrandIdentity.

Duy Long Dang's curator insight, October 1, 2014 2:43 AM

media as a vehicle to drive the business and reach the target market in the global scale

 

Rescooped by Abbey Davis from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Your Company Needs a Brand Personality

Your Company Needs a Brand Personality | Brand | Scoop.it

Really successful online marketers are companies with a powerful, consistent brand personality. Why? Well...In the last year or so, I’ve noticed a brilliant shift in the world of online marketing. As you know, many of the companies that are growing at a fast clip are using content marketing. They’re communicating with their customers. They’re giving away information for free. But even more than that, the really successful online marketers are companies with powerful, consistent brand personalities. They know who they are and what they stand for. And it comes across in every blog post, newsletter, webpage, and communication....Here's how...


Via Jeff Domansky
Abbey Davis's insight:

Very thought provoking reading in terms of identifying what your brand personality is opposed to trying to be big and bold and funny like other brands have done successfully. 

 

First of all the personality must be appropriate for your brand and secondly it must reflect what your brand stands for. 

 

Two points that stand out the most for me in the consideration of brand personality is consistency and authenticity - any one consumer who looks at your advertising, sees your social media and marketing content etc should be able to identify who you are and what you stand for. On a deeper level even relate to the personality and feel like they have a relationship with that brand. 

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, June 24, 2013 8:15 PM

The most successful social marketing companies are creating brand personalities and integrating these brand personae into every aspect of their marketing and communication. Thoughtful reading.

Ali Anani's curator insight, June 25, 2013 12:20 AM

Like humans, brands have a personality. Make it popular.

Rescooped by Abbey Davis from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Brand Identity

Brand Identity | Brand | Scoop.it

Brand teams are quick to rebrand when they hit a rough patch. But they sometimes forget that a brand is more than a company name, logo, tagline, or ad creative. And that a shiny new brand identity won’t automatically solve all of the problems of the business.

 

The marketing world is littered with failed rebranding initiatives (from the Gap to Tropicana) that illustrate one simple truth about branding. A company doesn’t own a brand. It’s consumers do. Giving a brand a new coat of paint (or dressing it in sheep's clothing) won’t change consumers feelings and expectations of a brand....


Via Jeff Domansky
Abbey Davis's insight:

This article makes a brilliant point, "A company doesn't own a brand, it's consumers do".

 

Companies which get caught up in the colour of their logo, or their witty company slogan will struggle to create a brand identity which portrays authenticity to consumers. Consumers will make up their own mind about a brand, and no fancy logo or slogan will have influence over that, it's the authenticity of the brand identity that consumers see. 


Consumer insight is the most valuable research marketers can have to understand what consumers really want and how consumers see their brand. In this article RadioShack uses valuable consumer insight to rebrand their company so they were inline with how valuable consumers saw them and this way they were able to deliver what their consumers wanted. 

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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, September 8, 2014 2:57 PM

Tom Fishburne, AKA @marketoonist reminds us what matters most about a brand in "Rebranding."

Payton Cox's curator insight, September 29, 2014 6:41 PM

Companies often believe a new brand identity will automatically solve all of the problems of the business. Thats like putting a fresh coat of paint on a car with a broken radiator and thinking its fixed. This article raised a valid point "a company does not own a brand, consumers do". Consumer insight is the most valuable research marketers can have to understand what consumers really want and how consumers see their brand. It is important to engage consumers in the rebranding process.

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That Diner Feeling: How Denny's Became A Weirdly Successful Content Marketer

That Diner Feeling: How Denny's Became A Weirdly Successful Content Marketer | Brand | Scoop.it

Chief brand officer Frances Allen talks about Denny's content marketing success, how it manages its offbeat social media persona, and the five core principles driving it all.

 

When it comes to translating a marketing strategy, and a brand voice via real-time channels like Twitter, most marketers find it hard to get out of their own way--layers of approval, and the simple lack of understanding of what the brand voice even is, leads to banality, or worse. So how has Denny's, of all companies, managed to become a weird sort of beacon of content realness? Chief brand officer Frances Allen says the company’s strategy is an extension of five core principles of marketing, and it’s helped Denny's boost not only its cultural footprint but also its sales growth for 11 of the last 12 quarters.

Abbey Davis's insight:

Brand personality should be authentic, engaging, exciting and should pull you in and make you feel like you have a relationship with this brand like you would with a friend. Denny's has stepped outside the box and built a brand personality that is brash, bold and humorous and people love it. The interaction through social media is astounding. 

 

One thing that really stood out for me reading this article is how Denny's took a leap and strived to break through the noise and clutter by taking risks and being bold. 

more...
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