Brand Marketing in Digital
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APAC marketers flag mobile first as key differentiator: Adobe report

APAC marketers flag mobile first as key differentiator: Adobe report | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

Marketers in the Asia Pacific value the smartphone more highly than marketers in other areas of the world, according to research released by Adobe.

Digital Trends 2015, an econsultancy, surveyed more than 6000 marketers worldwide, with 14 per cent from Asia Pacific. About 10 per cent of marketers in the Asia Pacific said becoming a mobile-first company will be the primary way that they will differentiate their organisation from competitors, compared to 5 per cent in North America and 7 per cent in Europe.

A majority of marketers in all three regions chose customer service and customer experience as the primary way to differentiate from rivals.

“The smartphone dominates as the device of choice among the majority of APAC consumers, and is used to research, communicate and make purchases, so it makes perfect sense that more marketers here than anywhere else in the world are prioritising development of a mobile-first business,” said Adobe APAC president, Paul Robson.


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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, February 23, 2015 9:05 AM

Mobile is gathering momentum with marketers especially in the Asia Pacific.

Joseph Palumbo, MBA,'s curator insight, February 23, 2015 7:12 PM

Do you have a mobile first strategy for your career or company? If not the world can be passing you by. 

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First-Party Data: ‘The Closest Version Of The Truth’

First-Party Data: ‘The Closest Version Of The Truth’ | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

A critical mistake companies often make is to overlook an important type of data that can provide valuable insight: first-party data, according to Jay Marwaha, president and CEO of Syntasa, a behavioral analytics company. But in the quest to convert big data into “big insight,” a company’s own customer behavior data is the most valuable. Granted, converting customer data into insight is a complex process, but the competitive advantage gained by doing so is powerful.


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What are the Nine types of Digital Ad Fraud?

What are the Nine types of Digital Ad Fraud? | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

John Wilpers, editor of the FIPP Innovation in Magazine Media annual reports, presents innovative ways to detect and prevent digital ad fraud.

John presented the ins and outs of digital advertising fraud in his article: "You're infected, and probably don't even know it". These are his take on the types of ad fraud out there. 

1.     Impression (CPM) Ad Fraud


Impression ad fraud has several parts:


  • Hidden ad impressions
  • Fake sites
  • Video ad fraud
  • Paid traffic fraud
  • Ad re-targeting fraud


HIDDEN AD IMPRESSIONS: Hidden ad impressions (also called ad stuffing or ad stacking) come from fraudsters either placing teeny one-pixel-by-one-pixel windows throughout a web page and serving ads into those virtually invisible ad spaces, or stacking layers of ads one on top of the other in the same space but only the top ad is visible. Some pages observed in a study by the Association of National Advertisers (ANA) and digital security firm WhiteOps found 85 ads on a single page where few if any ads were actually visible. Video ads can also be stuffed into 1x1 spaces or continuously looped in stacks so no user ever sees it. 


The result is a huge ad inventory (tens of millions a day) on ad exchanges, all of which can be sold but few or none of which are never seen. For example, an AdAge investigation found two examples of massive fraud: One fraudulent site (modernbaby.com) offered 19 million impressions per day on one exchange while another fraudulent site (interiorcomplex.com) offered 30 million ad impressions per day on another exchange.


FAKE SITES: Fraudsters create fake sites containing only ad slots and either no content or generic content often repeated from one fake page to the next. None of these sites draws huge traffic (to avoid creating suspicion) but networks of fake sites sold on programmatic ad exchanges can generate millions in revenues taken together.


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TV Advertising in 2015: Adapting to the Digital Age

TV Advertising in 2015: Adapting to the Digital Age | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

With consumers now turning to their smartphones and tablets during TV ad breaks, the nature of advertising is changing.


In the digital age a number of mediums have joined TV as lucrative ways to market businesses.


From social media platforms like Twitter and Instagram to simply creating online content, the modern-day marketing expert must have a firm grasp on all of the available methods to promote their company.


What exactly is TV syncing?


TV syncing is about synchronising delivery of ad campaigns across multiple screens simultaneously to encourage better consumer engagement. There are various ways to achieve this, including:


  1. Utilising TV-synced online ads – which appear on second screens the moment a related TV commercial airs – to recapture viewers’ attention
  2. Synced homepages – where the TV advertised product appears on the advertiser’s homepage the instant the commercial is broadcast


There are various ways that performance can be measured depending on the type of TV syncing used. For TV-synced online ads, advertisers can measure the extent of recaptured audience attention using the traditional TV metric of GRP, or its online equivalent – Active GRP.


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The 4 Major Digital Ad Formats Face Off

The 4 Major Digital Ad Formats Face Off | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

Much has been said about the death of the traditional banner ad, and new benchmarking research from Adform highlights the format’s inability to compete with more dynamic digital offerings. Not only did rich media ads deliver 267 percent more clickthroughs than a traditional banner, but banners also came in dead last in in-screen impressions. 


Telecommunications companies seem to have already tapped into this trend, as one recent report said they are putting as much as 77 percent of their mobile spend in rich media and video ads.

But even for those underperforming banners, there’s an audience. An analysis by vertical showed content related to law, government and politics provided the highest CTR in standard banners, as well as high engagement. This same content delivered the lowest CTR for otherwise high-performing rich media ads.

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Twitter is not a strategy: why digital marketing should be all about the customer

Twitter is not a strategy: why digital marketing should be all about the customer | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

Business is in flux. We suffer from disorientation wrought by tech- nological change. Convention has been upended, and the digital world — a universe of bits and bytes, atomistic fragmentation that mocks tradition—is all variables, no constants. The rise of search engines and ecommerce has changed the balance of power between marketers and consumers.


In May 2013 the Financial Times warned, “Algorithms threaten to end ‘Mad Men’ era of TV ads.” Marketers, traditionally expert in product development and brand messaging, are now expected to decipher the meaning of statistics flowing from “machine-to-machine connectivity.” And, given the dizzying pace of innovation occurring in cyberspace, reasonable people can ask: Across unsettled high-tech terrain, is the term digital expert an oxymoron?


CEOs look to the beast itself for salvation, intoxicated by the promise of new ways to maximize return on investment. A typical Business Insider headline: “Big Data Can Help Marketers Unlock up to $200 Billion.” Buzzwords abound: CRM, cookies, digital ecosystems, experience optimization, platformization, algorithmic customization. The advertising world is experiencing unprecedented tumult. In the midst of a digital big bang, the advertising giant TBWA advocates disruption to its clients—that is, the unsettling of category convention to achieve competitive differentiation—whereas Publicis Worldwide wants brands to “lead the change.” But what change and how?


Digital Salvation?


Digital technology offers an infinite—and intimidating—range of ways for brands to engage with consumers. Connections can happen in real time. Brand communications can be transformed into brand journalism, with social network feeds providing consumers with relevant news as they go through their day. Branded apps—from Trail- head, The North Face’s hiking path locator, to Allergycast, Johnson & Johnson’s pollen index counter—transform passively received propositions into actual services. Brand promises flower into three-dimensional experiences.


The gamut of possibilities on this new commercial landscape is almost infinite, too broad for simplistic solutions. More important, the range of strategic imperatives confronted by various product categories is vast, and their needs are incompatible with a paint- by-numbers manual. One thing, however, is certain. Regardless of whether it is cola or computers being sold, the exploding array of digital channels presents increased opportunities to connect and confuse.


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Modern Ad Dollars go to Digital Pioneers - Huffington Post Canada (blog)

Modern Ad Dollars go to Digital Pioneers - Huffington Post Canada (blog) | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

As digital media consumption continues to increase -- whether it be online, mobile, tablet or smart TV -- it's obvious brand marketers (and their ad dollars) are following suit.


A recent study by Nielsen shows that advertisers, big and small, are turning to the Internet to push their brands. Though many respondents said they still plan to use online advertising for direct response, more and more are spending money on digital brand advertising to promote their company, product or service.


But these digital branding dollars aren't coming at the expense of direct response. The funds are coming from offline or traditional ad budgets, with 48 per cent moving away from TV this year. According to the study, nearly three-quarters (70 per cent) of brand marketers plan to increase their use of social media in 2013, followed closely by mobile advertising (69 per cent) and video advertising (64 per cent).


Not surprisingly, the numbers are up from projections made in 2012, indicating a continued shift toward the medium where consumers are increasingly spending the large amounts of time. The study also found 72 per cent of online video buyers increased their budgets for the medium over the last year, with 39 per cent drawing those budgets from TV.

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Bridging the gap: How mobile is tying together online and offline customer ... - The Drum

Bridging the gap: How mobile is tying together online and offline customer ... - The Drum | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

With mobile device penetration at an all-time high, marketers must be quick to grasp how to capitalise on an audience that is permanently connected and ready to interact at the drop of a hat.


The number of smartphone and tablet users globally continues to soar with 64 per cent of mobile users owning smartphones in the UK last December and nearly a third of all UK online page views coming from mobile devices during the same month, according to ComScore, a figure that will no doubt continue to climb throughout this year, aided by the rise of 4G.

This rapid adoption of internet-enabled devices and the inevitable fragmentation it incurs presents as many opportunities as it does challenges. The ability to measure behaviour across multiple devices in a way that is comparable with other marketing metrics remains a massive challenge, as does defining how best to advertise on smartphones and tablets, which demand strict privacy measures and ad frequency capping.


Understanding when a consumer wants to be engaged with on their mobile device and when they don’t is a delicate balance, and if marketers get it wrong the results can be disastrous.


Some experts believe the explosion of devices, from smartphones to tablets and phablets, could prompt an over-zealous reaction from marketers keen to capitalise on the resultant opportunities, which could in turn alienate consumers entirely.

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Digital Is About People, Not Technology!

Digital Is About People, Not Technology! | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

Forget technology — it’s still all about people participation.

That was the key takeaway from the different presentations at Wednesday’s Engage: The NYC Digital Storytelling Conference, held here at The Standard Hotel.

The focus of the program was about how companies can use digital for their brand positioning, but the criticism that came up repeatedly was that firms are too focused on the technology surrounding digital when they should be focusing on engaging their audience in a dialogue.

Mike Monello, cofounder and chief creative officer at marketing agency Campfire NYC that specializes in participatory storytelling, told attendees, “The best stories aren’t locked down to a media format.”

He explained that as storytelling moved from the oral tradition to books and other mediums, what was lost was participation. “The Internet brings participation back…That’s huge,” he said.

One mistake some firms are making is using traditional media to fit the digital format. Instead, companies should think more about creating a communal experience. Firms need to “fan the communities that exist because people want to communicate with each other. It’s less about the digital story than we think,” he said. When you bring communities together, you’re deepening the reaction to the brand, he advised.

Monello also spoke about needing different layers of experience to address the three major audience participants: Skimmers are the broadest group, and are the least engaged; dippers are interested and may participate in the discussion, and divers, though the smallest group, are the most active participants and through their activity generate the interest in the other groups to create the overall “buzz” for the brand. 

Another key Monello zeroed in on is the concept of story giving versus storytelling, or creating a story to tell that in turn creates an experience that enables the participants to become the storytellers. “Telling implies a linear narrative. It’s the old way of thinking. Story giving can apply to any digital format,” he concluded. 

Adam Berger, the creative strategist at Facebook, said, “Storytelling as a medium we don’t think will change that much. When and how you tell the story will change.” 

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Who Actually Clicks on Banner Ads? [Infographic]

Who Actually Clicks on Banner Ads? [Infographic] | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

Website visitors are banner blind. And if they do pay attention to the display ads cluttering their online experience, they can put a stop to irrelevant messaging by installing an ad blocker. Hey, it's tough for any brand to compete with plug-ins that can replace banner ads with pictures of puppies and kittens.


But this isn't to say banner ads are all bad. In fact, there have been some pretty creative uses of the display format. But overall, people are tired of being bombarded with ads that don't apply to them or are ill-timed. They lost trust, so they stopped clicking. 


But who are the ones actually clicking on banner ads out there? Prestige Marketing figured this out and created the below infographic. The information should make any brand commit to native advertising if they haven't already. 


To view the infographic please click the link below;


Via Brian Yanish - MarketingHits.com, THE OFFICIAL ANDREASCY, malek, Os Ishmael
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Adobe's new ad report: larger mobile screens are kicking ads into higher gear

Adobe's new ad report: larger mobile screens are kicking ads into higher gear | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

The growing popularity of large-screen mobile devices is having a big effect on mobile ads. That’s one of the takeaways from the new Adobe Digital Index’s Q4 Digital Advertising Benchmark report, released today.


Bigger smartphones, as well as phablets and tablets, mean that more of the clicks on ads are intentional — and fewer are “fat finger” accidental ones.


Fingers tapping what people actually want appears to be affecting both clickthrough rates (CTR) and cost-per-click rates (CPCs) for mobile ads.

Clickthrough rates for mobile devices saw a big boost in the report, 27 percent year-over-year for tablets and 26 percent for smartphones. This, in turn, has driven a 19 percent increase in CTR for Google advertisers in general (Q4 year-over-year).


The much higher CTR also represents a more efficient ad spend, the report noted, since the cost-per-click (CPC) rates are up only 8 percent on Google. In other words, it’s more return for the buck. Yahoo/Bing, the report said, is not so efficiently optimized, as CPC there is up 7 percent year-over-year while CTR growth is zero.


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Altimeter: Mobile Still 'Underappreciated And Misunderstood'

Altimeter: Mobile Still 'Underappreciated And Misunderstood' | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

According to "The Inevitability of a Mobile-Only Customer Experience," CMOs must stop relegating mobile to agencies and instead assign someone inside the organization to champion the idea of mobile-first and mobile-only.


"Mobile’s not just another thing to bolt onto the digital strategy," said Brian Solis, principal analyst at Altimeter. "Mobile, to put it nicely, is underappreciated or even misunderstood as a channel and as a platform. Even the more advanced brands that are thinking mobile-first are merely adapting a legacy digital philosophy to a smaller screen.” 


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Fixing online advertising: How to beat bots, scammers ... and the invisibility problem

Fixing online advertising: How to beat bots, scammers ... and the invisibility problem | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

What do we know about online ad viewability? Enough to know that it’s a significant problem.


We know that the American Association of Advertising Agencies (4A’s), the IAB, and the advertisers themselves all want online ad viewability to become a reality. But diagnosing a problem is much simpler than curing it, and on that front the online advertising community still has a long way to go.


Even reaching a consensus about what’s possible has been difficult.

The IAB recently released a “State of Viewability” report, setting 70 percent viewability as the standard that should be expected for online ads in 2015. The 4A’s has reportedly refused to endorse the guidelines, making the argument that brands that pay for, say, one million views, shouldn’t actually be paying for 700,000.


But the fact of the matter is, even getting to 70 percent viewability is an overly optimistic expectation for many in digital advertising. Whether it’s bot fraud and scam publishers, or more mundane problems like ads failing to load, windows being obscured in the browser, or a user scrolling quickly up or down the page, there still isn’t even a reliable way to judge ad viewability, let alone guarantee it.


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Do you know where your clicks come from? (infographic)

Do you know where your clicks come from? (infographic) | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

Marketers today are running ad campaigns across a wide range of channels, platforms, and devices, but 58% still rely on single-touch attribution models (i.e., first/last click, first/last touch). Perhaps even more surprising is that only 54% of marketers have an attribution system in place at all.

Without a sophisticated attribution model taking multiple customer touchpoints into account, marketers are likely undervaluing their programs or missing essential customer insights on which combination of initiatives are driving success.

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CMO Council, Nielsen Find Marketers Love Digital, Want ROI

CMO Council, Nielsen Find Marketers Love Digital, Want ROI | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

Remember when the idea of doing a brand campaign online was laughable? The technology wasn't optimal, delivery options were narrow, pricing was pretty much CPM, and KPIs were click-throughs. That wasn't so long ago, really, but neither were flip phones. Now "rich media" is as redundant as “smartphones.” 


Chief marketers get it, and are spending more on it. The CMO Council's latest take on where digital dollars are going shows big increases in digital branding versus direct marketing. Theirsurvey — with Nielsen assisting, of 546 senior marketers, 661 agency executives and 377 publishing representatives in April through July this year  finds that marketers are running 33% more digital ad campaigns than direct response and that overall, marketers are doing 19% more digital ad campaigns this year versus last.

Seventy percent of marketers increased digital ad spend this year, a 15% increase versus last year. Within that group, 70% said they would increase their use of mobile for brand ads and 50% said they would increase ads optimized for PC and laptop. Fewer than 10% said they would lower brand ad spend online. 

Sixty-five percent said they would increase spend on digital video, and among those, 49% said they that increased digital video spend is being funded by shifting budget from offline. 

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5 Ways To Build Brands In The Post-digital World

5 Ways To Build Brands In The Post-digital World | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

Interbrand’s Jez Frampton offers a roadmap for success in the post-digital world, wherein digital underlies everything and consumers are co-creators of brands.


Simon Smith, our European Head of Digital, has a mantra--“Everything is digital." He also believes that “Digital is the most misunderstood word in business today.”


In 2011 we surveyed more than 800 companies about their digital strategy. Some 16% described their company as "digitally inactive." And of those who had a digital strategy, two-thirds confessed to implementing it in a fragmented way.


Here’s an overview of why--and how--you should catch up and build success in our post-digital world.


RECOGNIZE THE NEW POWER DYNAMIC


Digital media have triggered profound shifts in consumers’ interactions and relationships with businesses. The language of B2C and B2B is no longer relevant. At Interbrand, we use the terms business and consumer (B&C) and business and business (B&B) to describe how businesses and consumers now work together to create brands. And for brand, read: business.


Consumer-created content and conversations are driving organizations’ image, reputation and bottom line. This represents a significant shift in dynamic. As consumers become increasingly influential, businesses are becoming less powerful.


This means that you need to focus more on understanding, engaging and staying relevant to consumers, and less on regimenting or controlling them. Vitamin Water and Pepsi have both demonstrated how stronger engagement with their markets can create more successful products and services. Others would do well to follow their lead. In contrast, BP failed to engage with the debate after the Gulf of Mexico oil spill in 2010. Trying to "shout" back with big budget advertising only served to alienate people and further damage the company’s reputation.


RESPOND TO THE PURCHASING REVOLUTION


It’s time to tear up the traditional "funnel" model of consumer purchasing. Consumers now go through a dynamic, non-linear decision-making process. What other consumers say about a brand is becoming the most important input in consumer choice. More than two-thirds of global consumers, young and old alike, seek online reviews or recommendations from others. And we’ve all been put off a product or service by a lone bad review.


A fluid and uncertain market is the new normal, which means traditional marketing strategies are no longer effective. In this world, responsiveness trumps efficiency. The ability to engage with customers one-on-one, particularly after purchase, is vital to long-term business success. Doing this adds value, generates revenue and--most importantly--builds customer loyalty.

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Real-Time Marketing is Driving the Long-Term Brand Narrative

Real-Time Marketing is Driving the Long-Term Brand Narrative | Brand Marketing in Digital | Scoop.it

The real-time imperative is here. Consumers have higher expectations for responsiveness, participation and relevance than ever before. 42% of consumers think brands should respond to their questions within an hour. News, memes and trends are traveling faster than ever, as our attention spans get shorter, dropping by 58% in the last 10 years.


There’s too much information to process: there’s 60 times more content from brands in our newsfeeds than just two years ago. People have started ignoring everything on the periphery of their screens. They are 400 times more likely to survive a plane crash than click on a banner ad.

We’re focused on images – which have 5x more engagement on Facebook than non-visual posts – and what’s trending NOW.


These changes are fueling a real-time, creative content revolution. In order to break through the clutter, brands must create engaging, visual content that connects with consumers about things they are thinking and talking about in real-time.


Real Time Becomes Real


While interest in real-time marketing began to surge during the Oreo Daily Twist campaign in summer 2012, the Super Bowl was the true tipping point for real-time content, evolving from marketing debates about creative newsrooms to household conversations in the living rooms of millions of people.


After Oreo won the Super Bowl with its dunk in the dark post, dozens of brands jumped on the real-time marketing train. The first big test was the Academy Awards. Sensing a surge in interest, Edelman’s David Armano proposed – and brands used – the #OscarsRTM hashtag to track the branded real-time marketing efforts. Some posts were good. Many were not. All of the results were minimal.


Despite the mixed success of opportunistic content around the Academy Awards, the pace with which brands have adopted real-time content has only increased. The Harlem Shake surged from the antics of five Australian teenagers to dorm rooms, break rooms and boardrooms around the world in record time, reaching a billion views in 40 days, half the time it took Gangnam style to reach this milestone. From the Simpsons’ “Homer Shake” to Sony’s “Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2”, many brands created their own iterations of the Harlem Shake. A few were wildly successful. But only a handful of the early videos created any kind of traction for a brand.

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