Brand Equity
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9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com

9 inspiring ads that broke down stereotypes (single page view) - iMediaConnection.com | Brand Equity | Scoop.it

Brand messaging has long permeated our culture. In the 1960s, American girls grew up believing that "blondes have more fun" and if you "give her a Hoover, you give her the best."

 

Mad Men-era ads promoting lotions and dishwashing liquids extolled the terror of turning 30. Ladies, your hands and face will dry up like a crustacean if you do not moisturize constantly. In the words of an old lotion ad, "Would you want to hold hands with a lobster?"

 

While a lot of progress has been made in the last 50 years, sexism and ageism obviously haven't disappeared from advertising. A woman, regardless of color, is often portrayed in limited capacities. She's young mommy calmly strapping her kid into a minivan or she's the mom with a Mona Lisa smile pulling out a fried, frozen chicken dish proud of her cleverness at meal problem-solving. Invariably, this includes a Martha Stewart look that has sustained for 25 years: blue work shirts and khakis. 
 
If a woman is over 30, she is plopped on a couch chatting about her intestinal bacteria with Jamie Lee Curtis or doling out sage cleaning tips. If she's under 30, she's the large breasted, slim-hipped "up for anything" sexpot who paaarrrties with a cold round of brew. This is the same woman who, upon turning 45, becomes the patient, yet loving "up for anything" spouse of her tired, irritable, cannot get anything up, 50-plus partner of erectile dysfunction prescription drug ads. And all of these white gals do yoga!

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Sophie Bloomfield's curator insight, August 12, 2014 9:33 PM

These brands have made a bold move by confronting stereotypes. Not only do I applaud them from an ethical viewpoint, but it's also interesting to see that these risky ads have sparked a lot of social conversation about their brands; both good and bad. Is any attention good attention?

Rescooped by Laura Rayson from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Visual Content: The Key to Effective Brand Storytelling

Visual Content: The Key to Effective Brand Storytelling | Brand Equity | Scoop.it

...In his book Visual Impact Visual Teaching, Timothy Gangwer cites evidence that 90 percent of all data that the brain processes is visual. Additionally, it’s commonly held that 65 percent of people are visual learners, and the human brain purportedly processes visualization 60,000 times faster that it does written content.

 

However, when you think about it, the fact that we are visual learners first and foremost makes perfect sense from an evolutionary standpoint. Human beings were able to articulate thoughts through visuals long before the invention of the written word. People love visual content, and the more enriching the content, the deeper and more impactful the impression that your content will make. Additionally, given the fact that your average user will only give you about 10 to 20 seconds worth of a page visit to make an impact with your content, it follows that you had best make every single solitary second count.

 

But don’t take my word for it. In fact, don’t even take the word of these scientists, with all their “super-sciency-sounding” percentages and numbers. Let’s listen to the people themselves....


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 11, 2014 8:30 PM

Ryan Farrell writes about the value of visuals.

Rescooped by Laura Rayson from Public Relations & Social Marketing Insight
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Which of These 9 Misfires is Holding Your Brand Down?

There are nine strategic and tactical mistakes that can effectively kill any chance of brand elevation.

 

To have one of them uncorrected is bad. Three or four will drag your brand down and give your competition plenty of room to steal market share. Five or more of these is disastrous and will effectively kill your brand faster than a roomful of politicians. 

 

(The original draft of this list first appeared in one of my Fast Company blog posts, but I’ve updated it here to add that much more horsepower to the immediate usefulness of these nine points.)...


Via Jeff Domansky
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Jeff Domansky's curator insight, August 11, 2014 1:42 AM

David Brier writes: "Brand elevation is not a luxury, but a necessity in doing business today. Look at various business trends. Great is the new good. Here is how to shine."