brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery
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Linac-based stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in patients with meningioma - NEUROSURGERY BLOG

Linac-based stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in patients with meningioma - NEUROSURGERY BLOG | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it
Linac-based stereotactic radiotherapy and radiosurgery in patients with meningioma Radiation Oncology - Latest Articles Background: It was our purpose to analyze long-term clinical outcome and to identify prognostic factors after Linac-based...
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Researchers successfully treat brain tumor with sound waves - ANINEWS

Researchers successfully treat brain tumor with sound waves - ANINEWS | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it
ANINEWS Researchers successfully treat brain tumor with sound waves ANINEWS Lead researcher Javier Fandino said that the patient was awake and responsive during the treatment, and his team was able to successfully target and destroy a part of the...
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Awake Brain Surgery - Removal of metastatic brain tumor

Surgical footage of brain surgery to remove a metastatic brain tumor while the patient is awake! Medical case footage provided by Dr. Farhad M. Limonadi of R...
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Neurosurgery Blog: Stereotactic radiosurgery for Spetzler-Martin Grade III arteriovenous malformations

Neurosurgery Blog: Stereotactic radiosurgery for Spetzler-Martin Grade III arteriovenous malformations | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it
Stereotactic radiosurgery for Spetzler-Martin Grade III arteriovenous malformations

Journal of Neurosurgery:... http://t.co/80sn2uwqky
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Stereotactic radiosurgery for Spetzler-Martin Grade III arteriovenous malformations

Hideyuki Kano, John C.Flickinger, Huai-che Yang, Thomas J.Flannery, Daniel Tonetti, Ajay Niranjan, L. Dade Lunsford

 

Journal of Neurosurgery, Apr 2014 / Vol. 120 / No. 4 / Pages 973-981

 

Object

The purpose of this study was to define the outcomes and risks of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) for Spetzler-Martin (SM) Grade III arteriovenous malformations (AVMs).

Methods

Between 1987 and 2009, SRS was performed in 474 patients with SM Grade III AVMs. The AVMs were categorized by scoring the size (S), drainage (D), and location (L): IIIa was a small AVM (S1D1L1, N = 282); IIIb was a medium/deep AVM (S2D1L0, N = 44); and IIIc was a medium/eloquent AVM (S2D0L1, N = 148). The median target volume was 3.8 ml (range 0.1–26.3 ml) and the margin dose was 20 Gy (range 13–25 Gy). Eighty-one patients (17%) underwent prior embolization, and 58 (12%) underwent prior resection.

Results

At a mean follow-up of 89 months, the total obliteration rates documented by angiography or MRI for all SM Grade III AVMs increased from 48% at 3 years to 69% at 4 years, 72% at 5 years, and 77% at 10 years. The SM Grade IIIa AVMs were more likely to obliterate than other subgroups. The cumulative rate of hemorrhage was 2.3% at 1 year, 4.4% at 2 years, 5.5% at 3 years, 6.4% at 5 years, and 9% at 10 years. The SM Grade IIIb AVMs had a significantly higher cumulative rate of hemorrhage. Symptomatic adverse radiation effects were detected in 6%.

Conclusions

Treatment with SRS was an effective and relatively safe management option for SM Grade III AVMs. Although patients with residual AVMs remained at risk for hemorrhage during the latency interval, the cumulative 10-year 9% hemorrhage risk in this series may represent a significant reduction compared with the expected natural history.

 

 

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Diffusion Imaging for Tumor Grading of Supratentorial Brain Tumors in the First Year of Life

Diffusion Imaging for Tumor Grading of Supratentorial Brain Tumors in the First Year of Life [PED... http://t.co/t7Lmi5BTf1
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AWAKE BRAIN SURGERY (Uncensored) - Resection of Oligodendroglioma, Right Frontal Lobe

Just to be clear this video is NOT intended to shock or scare its to educate and to commemorate the amazing medical doctors, surgeons, nurses that save lives...
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Image Guided Surgery for Brain Tumors

Dr. Chris McPherson explains how image-guided surgery (IGS) technology is used in the operating room. Similar to a GPS for your car, an IGS system helps the ...
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Alfredo Quiñones-Hinojosa (Johns Hopkins) Part 1: Brain Tumors

http://www.ibiology.org/ibioseminars/alfredo-quinones-hinojosa-part-1.html In part 1, Quiñones-Hinojosa discusses the history of brain tumors, different type...
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California's First MRI-Guided Laser Treatment for Brain Cancer

California's First MRI-Guided Laser Treatment for Brain Cancer | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it
Using a novel magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided laser technology, neurosurgeons at UC San Diego Health System have successfully treated a malignant tumor deep inside a patient's brain. This is the first time that ...
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Tumors 'light up' with new, unique imaging system using scorpion venom protein ... - EurekAlert (press release)

Tumors 'light up' with new, unique imaging system using scorpion venom protein ...
EurekAlert (press release)
LOS ANGELES (Feb.
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Early metastatic volume decrease after stereotactic radiosurgery linked to prolonged local control | Hematology Oncology

Early metastatic volume decrease after stereotactic radiosurgery linked to prolonged local control | Hematology Oncology | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it
Hematology Oncology | Volume reductions in brain metastases observed at 6 or 12 weeks after stereotactic radiosurgery are predictive of controlled local progression and reduced need for corticosteroid treatment, according to results of a...
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Stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with multiple brain metastases (JLGK0901): a multi-institutional prospective observational study

Masaaki Yamamoto, Toru Serizawa, Takashi Shuto, Atsuya Akabane, Yoshinori Higuchi, Jun Kawagishi, Kazuhiro Yamanaka, Yasunori Sato, Hidefumi Jokura, Shoji Yomo, Osamu Nagano, Hiroyuki Kenai, Akihito Moriki, Satoshi Suzuki, Yoshihisa Kida, Yoshiyasu Iwai, Motohiro Hayashi, Hiroaki Onishi, Masazumi Gondo, Mitsuya Sato, Tomohide Akimitsu, Kenji Kubo, Yasuhiro Kikuchi, Toru Shibasaki, Tomoaki Goto, Masami Takanashi, Yoshimasa Mori, Kintomo Takakura,  Naokatsu Saeki, Etsuo Kunieda, Hidefumi Aoyama, Suketaka Momoshima, Kazuhiro Tsuchiya

 

The Lancet Oncology, Volume 15, Issue 4, Pages 387 - 395, April 2014

 

BackgroundWe aimed to examine whether stereotactic radiosurgery without whole-brain radiotherapy (WBRT) as the initial treatment for patients with five to ten brain metastases is non-inferior to that for patients with two to four brain metastases in terms of overall survival.MethodsThis prospective observational study enrolled patients with one to ten newly diagnosed brain metastases (largest tumour <10 mL in volume and <3 cm in longest diameter; total cumulative volume ≤15 mL) and a Karnofsky performance status score of 70 or higher from 23 facilities in Japan. Standard stereotactic radiosurgery procedures were used in all patients; tumour volumes smaller than 4 mL were irradiated with 22 Gy at the lesion periphery and those that were 4—10 mL with 20 Gy. The primary endpoint was overall survival, for which the non-inferiority margin for the comparison of outcomes in patients with two to four brain metastases with those of patients with five to ten brain metastases was set as the value of the upper 95% CI for a hazard ratio (HR) of 1·30, and all data were analysed by intention to treat. The study was finalised on Dec 31, 2012, for analysis of the primary endpoint; however, monitoring of stereotactic radiosurgery-induced complications and neurocognitive function assessment will continue for the censored subset until the end of 2014. This study is registered with the University Medical Information Network Clinical Trial Registry, number 000001812.FindingsWe enrolled 1194 eligible patients between March 1, 2009, and Feb 15, 2012. Median overall survival after stereotactic radiosurgery was 13·9 months [95% CI 12·0—15·6] in the 455 patients with one tumour, 10·8 months [9·4—12·4] in the 531 patients with two to four tumours, and 10·8 months [9·1—12·7] in the 208 patients with five to ten tumours. Overall survival did not differ between the patients with two to four tumours and those with five to ten (HR 0·97, 95% CI 0·81—1·18 [less than non-inferiority margin], p=0·78; pnon-inferiority<0·0001). Stereotactic radiosurgery-induced adverse events occurred in 101 (8%) patients; nine (2%) patients with one tumour had one or more grade 3—4 event compared with 13 (2%) patients with two to four tumours and six (3%) patients with five to ten tumours. The proportion of patients who had one or more treatment-related adverse event of any grade did not differ significantly between the two groups of patients with multiple tumours (50 [9%] patients with two to four tumours vs 18 [9%] with five to ten; p=0·89). Four patients died, mainly of complications relating to stereotactic radiosurgery (two with one tumour and one each in the other two groups).InterpretationOur results suggest that stereotactic radiosurgery without WBRT in patients with five to ten brain metastases is non-inferior to that in patients with two to four brain metastases. Considering the minimal invasiveness of stereotactic radiosurgery and the fewer side-effects than with WBRT, stereotactic radiosurgery might be a suitable alternative for patients with up to ten brain metastases.

 

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Stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic spine tumors

Stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic spine tumors | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it

Chan NK, Abdullah KG, Lubelski D, Steinmetz MP, Benzel EC, Shin JH, Mroz TE

 

J Neurosurg Sci. 2014 Mar;58(1):37-44

 

Spinal metastases invariably affect the majority of patients with cancer. Many will develop symptoms related to pain and disability from epidural spinal cord compression as well as pathologic fracture of the vertebrae. With the emergence of targeted systemic therapies and a better understanding of cancer biology, patients are living longer with bony metastases. This poses particular challenges, as palliation of pain and maintenance of local tumor control are paramount to quality of life and overall functional independence for these patients. Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) has emerged as a potent primary standalone and adjuvant treatment option for spinal metastases. To date, the primary indications for SRS include 1) upfront standalone treatment for painful bony metastases in the oligometastatic patient, 2) standalone or post-operative treatment following progression or recurrence of local disease despite previous conventional external beam radiation therapy (cEBRT), and 3) following surgery during which epidural disease is decompressed and the spine stabilized when indicated. SRS has demonstrated a significant advantage over cEBRT for tumors traditionally regarded as relatively radioresistant such as sarcoma, melanoma, renal cell carcinoma, non-small cell lung cancer and colon carcinoma.9 The radiobiological advantage of increased tumoricidal dose delivery and spinal cord dose sparing in SRS have made this a powerful treatment alternative to cEBRT particularly within the context of re-irradiation. Given the limitations of spinal cord dose constraints, surgery is still the first-line therapy in patients with high-grade epidural spinal cord compression (ESCC). Epidural compression can be treated with SRS, however this risks radiation-induced myelopathy and challenges the safety of effective dose delivery at the dural margin.11 With increasing dose, radiation-induced vertebral fracture is the most serious and prevalent side effect of SRS.53 An overview of SRS, including the most common indications, complications, and outcomes for spinal metastases are presented here.

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Neurosurgery Blog: Stereotactic radiosurgery of brainstem cavernous malformations: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Neurosurgery Blog: Stereotactic radiosurgery of brainstem cavernous malformations: a systematic review and meta-analysis | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it
Stereotactic radiosurgery of brainstem cavernous malformations: a systematic review and meta-analysis

Journal... http://t.co/Mg5KG5Jco0
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Stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic spine tumors. - NEUROSURGERY BLOG

Stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic spine tumors. - NEUROSURGERY BLOG | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it
J Neurosurg Sci. 2014 Mar;58(1):37-44. Stereotactic radiosurgery for metastatic spine tumors. Chan NK1, Abdullah KG, Lubelski D, Steinmetz MP, Benzel EC, Shin JH, Mroz TE.
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The 'Basic' Science of Brain Tumors - Mikael Rinne, MD, PhD

Mikael Rinne, MD, PhD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute's Center for Neuro-Oncology, discusses the science and genetics behind brain tumors. Rinne covers how ...
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Stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with multiple brain metastases (JLGK0901): a multi-institutional prospective observational study : The Lancet Oncology

Stereotactic radiosurgery for patients with multiple brain metastases (JLGK0901): a multi-institutional prospective observational study. By - Prof Masaaki Yamamoto MD, Toru Serizawa MD, Takashi Shu...
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Spotlight on: Brain Tumors – Philadelphia CyberKnife - Cancer Treatment Using the Image-guided CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery System - Linkis.com

Spotlight on: Brain Tumors – Philadelphia CyberKnife - Cancer Treatment Using the Image-guided CyberKnife Stereotactic Radiosurgery System - Linkis.com | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it
According to the American Cancer Society, brain tumors account for one in every 100 cancers diagnosed annually in the United States. CyberKnife® stereotactic radiosurgery is an advanced treatment o...
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Microsurgical Resection of a Brain Tumor

For more neurosurgery videos visit www.NeurosurgeryBlog.com. Neurosurgeon Peyman Pakzaban, M.D. demonstrates the steps involved in resection of a small metas...
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Radiation Oncology | Full text | Neurosymptomatic carvenous sinus ...

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and fractionated Stereotactic radiotherapy (SRT) are advanced modalities of radiotherapy for treatment of patients with inoperable and symptomatic CSMs. The authors evaluated the long term ...
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Stereotactic Radiosurgery at Mount Sinai

Watch The Mount Sinai Medical Hospital use stereotactic radiosurgery to treat brain tumors. Learn more about the Comprehensive Brain Tumor Program at Mount S...
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Gene mutation defines brain tumors that benefit from aggressive surgery - Oncology Nurse Advisor

Gene mutation defines brain tumors that benefit from aggressive surgery - Oncology Nurse Advisor | brain tumors and stereotactic radiosurgery | Scoop.it
Gene mutation defines brain tumors that benefit from aggressive surgery Oncology Nurse Advisor Astrocytomas are the most common type of malignant brain tumor, and are a type of glioma that includes the highly aggressive glioblastoma and the less...
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The volumetric response of brain metastases after stereotactic radiosurgery and its post-treatment implications

Sharpton SR, Oermann EK, Moore DT, Schreiber E, Hoffman R, Morris DE, Ewend MG

 

Neurosurgery. 2014 Jan;74(1):9-15

 

BACKGROUND:

Changes in tumor volume are seen on magnetic resonance imaging within weeks after stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS), but it remains unclear what clinical outcomes early radiological changes portend.

OBJECTIVE:

We hypothesized that rapid, early reduction in tumor volume post-SRS is associated with prolonged local control and favorable clinical outcome.

METHODS:

A retrospective review of patients treated with CyberKnife SRS for brain metastases at the University of North Carolina from 2007 to 2009 was performed. Patients with at least 1 radiological follow-up, minimal initial tumor volume of 0.1 cm, no previous focal radiation, and no recent whole-brain radiation therapy were eligible for inclusion.

RESULTS:

Fifty-two patients with 100 metastatic brain lesions were analyzed and had a median follow-up of 15.6 months (range, 2-33 months) and a median of 2 (range, 1-8) metastatic lesions. In treated metastases in which there was a significant tumor volume reduction by 6 or 12 weeks post-SRS, there was no local progression for the duration of the study. Furthermore, patients with metastases that did not reduce in volume by 6 or 12 weeks post-SRS were more likely to require corticosteroids (P = .01) and to experience progression of neurological symptoms (P = .003).

CONCLUSION:

Significant volume reductions of brain metastases measured at either 6 or 12 weeks post-SRS were strongly associated with prolonged local control. Furthermore, early volume reduction was associated with less corticosteroid use and stable neurological symptoms.

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