boogienightspta
3 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by nájeracarrillo
Scoop.it!

Paul Thomas Anderson: “La Cienciología no es una secta, sino una religión nueva”

Paul Thomas Anderson: “La Cienciología no es una secta, sino una religión nueva” | boogienightspta | Scoop.it
El penúltimo genio del cine americano, Paul Thomas Anderson, bucea en la fundación de la Cienciología con The master
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by nájeracarrillo from Digital Cinema Tools
Scoop.it!

Film’s Not Dead Yet, Part 2: FotoKem’s Workflow for "The Master" in 70mm, 35mm, and 4K

Film’s Not Dead Yet, Part 2: FotoKem’s Workflow for "The Master" in 70mm, 35mm, and 4K | boogienightspta | Scoop.it

Posted by Bryant Frazer on September 27, 2012

 

"Curious about the deliverables for The Master, which hit theaters earlier this month in 70mm, 35mm, and 4K DCP formats? So was I. I asked FotoKem, which provided large-format and finishing services for the film, to fill in some of the details.


Many cinephiles were excited when word got out that director Paul Thomas Anderson (Boogie Nights, There Will Be Blood) was shooting part of his new feature film in 65mm, yielding an image that should far outstrip standard 35mm film in quality. It felt like something of a resurrection for 70mm, which hasn't been used as an origination format for a narrative feature film in more than a decade. Buzz built as fans tried to sort out which theaters in which markets would receive coveted 70mm prints. According to a 9/18 update at Cigarettes & Red Vines, "the definitive Paul Thomas Anderson resource," a total of 16 70mm prints of the film were struck for worlwide distribution.


The existence of a 70mm version of the film raised an obvious question about the provenance of those prints: were they old-school film prints, created with photochemical intermediates rather than the now-standard digital-intermediate process? The answer, it turns out, is an unqualified yes. FotoKem said earlier this week that the 35mm shots — only about 25 percent of the film — were assembled and answer-printed, then blown up to a 65mm dupe negative, which was intercut with native 65mm footage in a complete negative cut of the film that was used to make 70mm release prints. Meanwhile, the 65mm material was transferred to a 35mm reduction negative, which was intercut with the original 35mm negative for production of 35mm prints. So a limited number of prints in both 35mm and 70mm formats were finished completely photochemically.

 

But that's not the end of the story."

...


studiodaily.com

fotokem.com


Via Thierry Saint-Paul
more...
No comment yet.