Board Sports
6 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Janice Bumgarner from cool nerd stuff
Scoop.it!

Kite rider: The girl who fought back from the brink - CNN International

Kite rider: The girl who fought back from the brink - CNN International | Board Sports | Scoop.it
Kite rider: The girl who fought back from the brink CNN International Kitesurfing is a fusion of some of the most exciting and challenging water sports, taking components of paragliding, surfing, windsurfing and wakeboarding before sprinkling some...
Janice Bumgarner's insight:

Right on girly thats is awesome!

more...
Janice Bumgarner's curator insight, July 4, 2013 1:14 PM

Right on girly thats is awesome!

Rescooped by Janice Bumgarner from Massage Fusion
Scoop.it!

Bruno Sroka will kiteboard from France to Ireland - SurferToday

Bruno Sroka will kiteboard from France to Ireland - SurferToday | Board Sports | Scoop.it

SurferToday Bruno Sroka will kiteboard from France to Ireland SurferToday Bruno Sroka will try to connect France to Ireland in a 240 nautical mile (444 kilometers) kiteboarding journey that will last 17 hours.

more...
Scooped by Janice Bumgarner
Scoop.it!

creepy

creepy | Board Sports | Scoop.it
In May 2010, I received a brown envelope. In it was a CD with an encrypted file containing six months of my life. Six months of metadata, stored by my cellphone provider, T-Mobile. This list of metadata contained 35,830 records. That’s 35,830 times my phone company knew if, where and when I was surfing the Web, calling or texting. The truth is that phone companies have this data on every customer. I got mine because, in 2009, I filed a suit against T-Mobile for the release of all the data on me that had been gathered and stored. The reason this information had been preserved for six months was because of Germany’s implementation of a 2006 European Union directive. All of this data had to be kept so that law enforcement agencies could gain access to it. That meant that the metadata of 80 million Germans was being stored, without any concrete suspicions and without cause. This “preventive measure” was met with huge opposition in Germany. Lawyers, journalists, doctors, unions and civil liberties activists started to protest. In 2008, almost 35,000 people signed on to a constitutional challenge to the law. In Berlin, tens of thousands of people took to the streets to protest data retention. In the end, the Constitutional Court ruled that the implementation of the European Union directive was, in fact, unconstitutional. In Germany, whenever the government begins to infringe on individual freedom, society stands up. Given our history, we Germans are not willing to trade in our liberty for potentially better security. Germans have experienced firsthand what happens when the government knows too much about someone. In the past 80 years, Germans have felt the betrayal of neighbors who informed for the Gestapo and the fear that best friends might be potential informants for the Stasi. Homes were tapped. Millions were monitored. Although these two dictatorships, Nazi and Communist, are gone and we now live in a unified and stable democracy, we have not forgotten what happens when secret police or intelligence agencies disregard privacy. It is an integral part of our history and gives young and old alike a critical perspective on state surveillance systems. When Wolfgang Schäuble, the interior minister from 2005 to 2009, pushed for the implementation of the data-retention law, Germans remembered the Stasi’s blatant disregard for privacy, as portrayed in the 2006 film “The Lives of Others.” They recalled their visits to the Hohenschönhausen district of Berlin, the site of the former Stasi detention center. They were reminded of the stories of their grandparents, about the fear-mongering agents in the Gestapo. This is why Mr. Schäuble’s portrait was often tagged provocatively with the phrase “Stasi 2.0.” Lots of young Germans have a commitment not only to fight against fascism but also to stand up for their own individual freedom. Germans of all ages want to live freely without having to worry about being monitored by private companies or the government, especially in the digital sphere. Click headline to read more--
more...
No comment yet.