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Rescooped by Emmanuel Baeten from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Forging a New Frontier in Protein Supply and Feed Sustainability - Feb 25, 2016

Forging a New Frontier in Protein Supply and Feed Sustainability - Feb 25, 2016 | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
WEST PALM BEACH, Fla., YELLOW SPRINGS, Ohio and IRVING, Texas, Feb. 25, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Intrexon Corporation (NYSE: XON), a leader in synthetic biology, today announced it has agreed to acquire the business of EnviroFlight LLC and form a joint venture with Darling Ingredients Inc. (NYSE: DAR), the world's largest publicly-traded developer and producer of sustainable natural ingredients from bio-nutrients. EnviroFlight has developed proprietary technologies which enable the rearing of non-pathogenic black soldier fly (BSF) larvae in an industrially scalable manner. This innovative and responsible approach has considerable potential within the $60 billion global animal feed industry as it will provide an environmentally-friendly, toxin-free, sustainable source of high-value nutrients. 

Via Ana C. Day
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Ana C. Day's curator insight, February 25, 2016 11:00 PM

"EnviroFlight's scalable approach utilizing BSF larvae opens the door to a plentiful source of high quality nutrients for the aquaculture and livestock industries. Notably within the fish and poultry markets, BSF larvae may be more representative of the typical diet of these natural insectivores than soymeal and other plant-based meal regimens. Additionally fishmeal and fish oil are multi-billion dollar products critical to aquaculture's continued growth, yet demand is outpacing the fairly inflexible supply for these valuable feeds whose manufacture are heavily dependent on wild-caught fish.

"Black Soldier Fly larvae meal may represent a very useful ingredient in aquaculture and importantly it has no impact on the marine ecosystem," stated Rick Barrows, Ph.D., Research Physiologist for Agricultural Research Service in the United States Department of Agriculture. Dr. Barrows added, "Starter diets for rainbow trout incorporating BSF larvae meal resulted in an increase in feed consumption and growth, showing high palatability suggesting it could be useful with some of the more finicky species such as salmon and yellowtail.  Furthermore we have also found the essential nutrients in BSF larvae meal to have high digestibility." 

In addition to reducing the depletion of marine ecosystems and decreasing dependence on non-sustainable protein sources, EnviroFlight's insect-based approach offers significant potential to recover the abundant food surpluses given its proficiency converting organic materials into valuable proteins and oils. While working with regulatory agencies to gain approvals for the use of BSF larvae for food animals, EnviroFlight will continue to supply select markets with high quality animal feed and all-natural fertilizers. "

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Les courants marins, énergie de demain

Les courants marins, énergie de demain | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
Les hydroliennes permettent de transformer l’énergie cinétique des courants marins en électricité. En Écosse, le groupe naval français DCNS a mis au point un prototype de turbine hydraulique de près de 1000 tonnes qui devrait être installé en plusieurs exemplaires à 35 mètres de profondeur attachée sur le sol marin pour capter les incessants mouvements de la mer et son énergie inépuisable. 
Un reportage de l'émission Futuremag diffusée sur Arte.

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Raphael Souchier's curator insight, December 10, 2015 8:24 AM

Une source d'énergie inépuisable, pour la quelle la Bretagne est très bien placée; on pourrait y produire l'équivalent de la production de 2 à 3 centrales nucléaires.

Rescooped by Emmanuel Baeten from Entomophagy: Edible Insects and the Future of Food
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La Universidad de Alicante y Bioflytech organizan una jornada internacional sobre insectos como fuente sostenible de proteina en la alimentación animal y la nutrición humana | BIOFLYTECH

La Universidad de Alicante y Bioflytech organizan una jornada internacional sobre insectos como fuente sostenible de proteina en la alimentación animal y la nutrición humana | BIOFLYTECH | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
El próximo miércoles 18 de marzo tendrán lugar las jornadas “Los insectos como fuente sostenible de proteínas en la alimentación animal y la nutrición humana”. El encuentro, que tendrá lugar en Salón de grados del Aulario II de la UA, profundizará en una temática novedosa y de gran interés por su repercusión industrial, social y económica: el  uso de la cría artificial y la producción masiva de biomasa de insectos para su empleo directo en alimentación animal (acuicultura, ganadería, alimentación de mascotas etc.) y en la nutrición (directa o indirecta) humana.
 

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Rescooped by Emmanuel Baeten from Global Trends
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Circular economy would increase European competitiveness and deliver better societal outcomes, new study reveals

Circular economy would increase European competitiveness and deliver better societal outcomes, new study reveals | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
This major report by Ellen MacArthur Foundation and McKinsey Center for Business and Environment, with financial support from SUN (Stiftungsfonds für Umweltökonomie und Nachhaltigkeit), offers a vi...

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Keurig and its competitors seek guilt-free ways to dispose of coffee pods

Keurig and its competitors seek guilt-free ways to dispose of coffee pods | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
The explosive growth of those single-serve coffee machines is fuelling concern about what they leave behind: billions of plastic coffee pods piling up in landfills worldwide.
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The puzzling flattening of carbon emissions and the problem of global growth

The puzzling flattening of carbon emissions and the problem of global growth | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
maybe flat carbon emissions are actually telling us something "no one" wants to hear: that economic growth has faltered or even halted for a large portion of the world's people and that we are going to have to deal with the consequences of that until we design a new system that can either grow for the benefit of everyone--a difficult proposition--or that can sustainably, equitably and successfully manage a steady-state economy--an even more difficult proposition.

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, March 29, 2015 3:21 PM

Must-read analysis of the growth and greenhouse emissions puzzle: "As long as the chimera of perpetual growth can be sold to the masses, no one will have to deal with the thorny issue of redistribution as the primary method for the economic betterment of the middle and lower classes."

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Innovative Startup Sells Coffee Grounds to Fuel Cars and Power Buildings » EcoWatch ("cool fuel idea")

Innovative Startup Sells Coffee Grounds to Fuel Cars and Power Buildings » EcoWatch ("cool fuel idea") | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
Bio-bean, a new London-based company, is upcycling coffee grounds into biofuel, which can help power buildings and fuel cars while reducing waste. Coffee shops

With 200,000 tons of coffee grounds produced in London annually, the potential of pulp-into-power can be massive. Bio-bean doesn’t just collect used grounds from local coffee shops, they also target roasting and freeze-dried coffee facilities.

After collecting the grounds, the company transports it to their processing plant in north London where machines turn these old grinds into biomass pellets and biodiesel in a patented process. This carbon-neutral fuel is then sold to businesses to power buildings and vehicles.

Coffee shops usually pay to have their grounds incinerated, taken to an anaerobic digestion plants or dumped in a landfill, where it releases harmful greenhouse gases, the company points out on their website. But with bio-bean, coffee grounds go further than giving you your morning fix.

“Bio-bean is aligned closely with the concept of the circular economy,” Kay told Co.Exist. “We view waste more as a valuable resource, simply in the wrong place.” (If you’d like to give a second life to your own coffee waste, try composting).

 


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, March 7, 2015 7:32 PM

As a coffee-lover, I like this idea.

"Bio-bean says they can save up to 53,200 barrels of oil a year, or the same as driving a London bus around the world 7,675 times. That’s not to mention that the company uses its own biofuel to power their fleet of trucks that’s used to collect coffee waste.

“Bio-bean uses a cradle-to-cradle business model, which means we use a waste product and turn it into something of value.” Kay says in the video. “London produces over 200,000 tons of waste coffee annually. Bio-bean hopes to tap into this resource in order to offset some of London’s energy demands.”

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Good news! Another ‘Zero Waste’ grocery store opens in France ("new behavioral options make a diff")

Good news! Another ‘Zero Waste’ grocery store opens in France ("new behavioral options make a diff") | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
High quality bulk ingredients, as long as you bring your own container -- sounds like my kind of dream store!

At day by day, there is no packaging; all 450 products are sold loose. You must bring your own containers or use the ones “graciously provided by other clients,” according to the website. This helps both the planet and one’s wallet, since we often pay for fancy excessive packaging without even realizing it. Bigorgne told La Voix du Nord that, in some cases, her package-free products are 40 percent cheaper than what you would pay in a conventional store, despite being of higher quality.

You can buy precisely the quantity of food that you want. “If you need only a single spoonful of coffee or two cinnamon sticks, I’ll sell it to you,” Bigorgne says. The idea is to reduce the amount of food waste that gets thrown away by selling exactly what a person will use. (An estimated 24 percent of calories produced globally are wasted, and that number is much higher in the U.S.)

This is not a new concept; it’s the way that many of our grandparents shopped. They would take a jar to the corner store to have it filled with however much of a particular ingredient they needed or could afford. While we enjoy a much greater selection of food than previous generations did, it is unfortunate that we’ve moved so far away from the bulk shopping model and the acceptance of reusable containers in stores.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, February 25, 2015 1:33 AM

New options in consumer behavior patterns make far better sense in finding sustainable solutions to the waste problem. The banning of plastic has not made a dent in our garbage volume. The latest MMDA data shows a 20% increase in Metro Manila landfill waste volume. We must be attacking the problem the wrong way.

"Stores like day by day show that the trend may be changing. Hopefully North America will take a lesson from Europe’s more forward-thinking grocery models and start realizing that there is another way to shop that doesn’t involve vast quantities of plastic packaging waste."

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Canada’s Largest Food Retailer To Sell Ugly Produce At Low Prices To Cut Food Waste

Canada’s Largest Food Retailer To Sell Ugly Produce At Low Prices To Cut Food Waste | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
Most food waste ends up in landfills, where it decomposes and releases methane, a greenhouse gas much more potent than carbon dioxide.

Loblaws, the country’s largest food retailer, launched a campaign last week to sell misshapen, “ugly” produce at a discounted rate in an effort to curb the country’s food waste problem (annually, Canadians waste some 40 percent of their food).

The campaign, called No Name Naturally Imperfect, offers aesthetically displeasing apples and potatoes at a discount of up to 30 cents in select Loblaws-owned stores in Ontario and Quebec. “We often focus too much on the look of produce rather than the taste,” said Ian Gordon, senior vice president, Loblaw Brands, Loblaw Companies Limited, in a press statement. “Once you peel or cut an apple you can’t tell it once had a blemish or was misshapen.”

According to the U.N. Environment Program, between 20 and 40 percent of produce is thrown away by farmers simply because it isn’t pretty enough for grocery store shelves. The produce being sold under Loblaws’ new campaign would have been used for juices or soups, or might not have been harvested at all, due to their appearance. Though the campaign is beginning with apples and potatoes, company officials hope that the program will serve as a springboard for the sale of other ugly fruits and vegetables in the future.

The move offers savings to both the consumer, who can access healthy produce at lower costs, and the Canadian government, which loses some $31 billion dollars annually on food waste. Globally, food waste costs nearly $400 billion annually, but according to a February report released by the U.K.-based Waste & Resources Action Program (WRAP), countries could save between $120 and $300 each year by focusing on reducing food waste.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, March 23, 2015 12:13 AM

Who says that the world doesn't produce enough food? Check this out and discover that there are many ways of curbing food waste, even in the Philippines. With the proliferation of supermarkets, I wonder how much is wasted because of appearance?

"In developed nations, food waste happens most often at the retail and consumer level. Grocery stores often adhere to strict quality guidelines that place too much emphasis on appearance, leading to the disposal of produce that is nutritionally sound but not aesthetically pleasing. Each year, enough unspoiled food is thrown away in developed nations to feed the world’s 870 million hungry people."

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Paris: LES BARGES DE LA PERMACULTURE

Paris: LES BARGES DE LA PERMACULTURE | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
Pour soutenir cette superbe idée auprès de la mairie de Paris, cliquez sur: https://idee.paris.fr/les-barges-de-la-permaculture
Objectif de l'idéeUne ferme maraîchère, sur la Seine, au cœur de la capitaleDescriptif de l'idée proposéeProjet parrainé par Philippe DESBROSSES, Perrine et Charles HERVE-GRUYER, Sacha GUEGAN, Pablo SERVIGNE Créer une ferme pour produire fruits et légumes, en plein cœur de Paris c’est possible, modélisable et reproductible ! Cette ferme ne sera pas seulement une originalité dans le paysage urbain et d’une grande beauté par les riches couleurs des végétaux, mais devra montrer sérieusement comment un maraîcher peut vivre de son activité en ville, grâce aux études qui y seront associées (INRA, Agroparitech …) A l’instar de la ferme permaculturelle du Bec Hellouin, cet espace montrera toutes les possibilités des nouvelles techniques de productions intensives respectueuses du vivant (sans aucun intrant chimique)...
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Raphael Souchier's curator insight, March 5, 2015 12:34 AM

Paysage fertile, coloré, à la fois immobile et mouvant. Un goût d’Asie mêlé d’ hortillonnages. Les maraîchers d’hier enfin descendus des collines de Belleville et Montreuil. 

... Mais quatre barges suffiront elles à nourrir Paris? il faut rêver d’urgence les 196 suivantes ;)

Raphael Souchier's curator insight, March 5, 2015 12:35 AM

Paysage fertile, coloré, à la fois immobile et mouvant. Un goût d’Asie mêlé d’ hortillonnages. Les maraîchers d’hier enfin descendus des collines de Belleville et Montreuil. 

... Mais quatre barges suffiront elles à nourrir Paris? il faut rêver d’urgence les 196 suivantes ;)

Isabelle Macquaire's curator insight, March 5, 2015 4:56 AM

Une pensée toute spéciale vers  Marie Dominique de Nature et Potagers en Ville

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Gypsum to Gypsum | From production to recycling

Gypsum to Gypsum | From production to recycling | Blue Economy | Scoop.it

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ZWE's curator insight, December 11, 2014 5:07 AM

Circular economy throughout a European collaborative project between the recycling industry, the demolition sector and the gypsum industry.

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Degrowth – A Vocabulary for a New Era: Review

Degrowth – A Vocabulary for a New Era: Review | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
To the extent that degrowth is an involuntary process then another set of issues arise – will the society and economy withstand the process without catastrophic breakdowns and what can the many kinds of projects and policies described in this book do to make energy descent a survivable process for the population? A great many people will be finding that their lifestyle packages are severely stressed and breaking apart and this will generate a great deal of fear and ‘negative’ emotions.

Via Willy De Backer
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Willy De Backer's curator insight, December 26, 2014 3:58 AM

Fascinating, must-read debate between Feasta's Brian Davey and  Giorgios Kallis on the framing of #degrowth. Can we manage degrowth or do we prepare for collapse?

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Green economics versus growth economics

I have already noted that a central component of Piketty’s answer to the current crisis is more of the same – that is, more growth, the proceeds of which can then be ‘redistributed’. The harsh truth, however, may well be, at the level of public policy debate and democratic discussion, that growth is in practice an alternative to egalitarian redistribution, an alternative to any serious effort to create a more equal society. The promise of growth is a replacement for the need to share. That is how growthism has ‘superseded’ socialism: ‘left-wing’ politicians join right-wing politicians in the mantra that everyone benefits from a growing pie,

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Willy De Backer's curator insight, January 4, 2015 3:37 AM

Brilliant must-read critique of Piketty's 'Capital in the 21st century' starting from a 'limits to growth' perspective: 'The true condition for redistribution may well now be recognition that we can’t rely any longer on growth.'

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From one paradigm to the next

From one paradigm to the next | Blue Economy | Scoop.it

Via Raphael Souchier
Emmanuel Baeten's insight:

Go for the green arrow , engage for a bigger shift !

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Raphael Souchier's curator insight, January 28, 2013 2:28 PM

Thank you Jeffrey Hollender

Frédéric Liégeois's comment, October 4, 2013 5:13 AM
on y est... c'est ça.
Vincent Pluymackers's curator insight, April 5, 2015 4:35 AM

Pas plus clair que ça!

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Top 10 Insect Feed Companies - 4ento

Top 10 Insect Feed Companies - 4ento | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
Insect feed for animals is now a reality. Find out which companies are leading the way and how they are producing revolutionary insect based products.

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Jean-François Kleinfinger's curator insight, April 2, 2015 2:50 AM

C'est plutôt les 10 plus actives en communication ...

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enviroflight in yellow springs finds unorthodox solution to world hunger

enviroflight in yellow springs finds unorthodox solution to world hunger | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
EnviroFlight has developed a method of aquaculture that could play a key role in solving world hunger.

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Awesome recipe from the The Zero-Waste... - Origami Owl-Melonie Brown, Independent Designer | Facebook

Awesome recipe from the The Zero-Waste... - Origami Owl-Melonie Brown, Independent Designer | Facebook | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
Awesome recipe from the The Zero-Waste Chef ;-)
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Politicians Challenged To “Seize The Prize Of Resources”

Politicians Challenged To “Seize The Prize Of Resources” | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
The Resource Association has today (31 March) released a set of policy proposals focused on the forthcoming UK General Election, urging politicians to be “be bold and seize the prize of resources, ...

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7 wastes Lean Six Sigma - YouTube ("tips from the #1 car manufacturer; identify the waste and solve it")

The 7 wastes of Lean six sigma, otherwise known as the 8 wastes if you include the most important waste - the waste of under utilised talent within your orga...

The reduction and elimination of waste is core to lean manufacturing. But what do we mean by waste? What types of waste exist? Well 7 types of waste (or Muda) were originally classified by Taiichi Ohno, the Chief Engineer at Toyota.  By reducing waste in all its forms, processes become more efficient, more productive and produce fewer defects. As we’ve seen lean manufacturing is all about adding value for the customer. Waste does not add value. So when we eliminate waste, by definition, we add value. Let’s take a look at the different types of waste.


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Bert Guevara's curator insight, March 18, 2015 1:27 AM

The reduction and elimination of waste is core to lean manufacturing. 

1. Overproduction

2. Waiting

3. Transporting

4. Inappropriate Processing

5. Unnecessary Inventory

6. Unnecessary Motions

7. Defects

In addition to the 7 original wastes, a new one is sometimes quoted. This is the Waste of Untapped Human Potential. The idea here is all the other wastes are only effective if you get the whole workforce involved. 

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Recleim Opens Closed-Loop Recycling Facility ("focus on resource recovery thru de-manufacturing")

Recleim Opens Closed-Loop Recycling Facility ("focus on resource recovery thru de-manufacturing") | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
Recycling services provider Recleim has opened its $40.6 million flagship center in Graniteville, South Carolina — the first facility in North America to feature an entirely closed-loop resource recovery process, t...

Recycling services provider Recleim has opened its $40.6 million flagship center in Graniteville, South Carolina — the first facility in North America to feature an entirely closed-loop resource recovery process, the company says.

Using exclusively licensed recycling technologies, Recleim de-manufacturers household appliances, HVAC systems, vending machines and related electronics into commodities — such as plastic, aluminum, copper, steel and pelletized foam — that are sold for reuse.

The company says it reduces landfill waste by recovering 95 percent of components in the appliances it processes and properly disposing of non-recyclable materials.

Recleim has already announced several agreements with companies to process their equipment including BSH Home Appliances, Pepsi Bottling Ventures and the South Carolina.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, March 7, 2015 7:00 PM

This type of "de-manufacturing" facility which focuses on resource recovery is needed in many countries, including the Philippines. With the increasing volume of electric appliances and e-gadgets, which significantly contribute to landfill trash, "closed-loop" recovery and recycling facilities like this are urgently needed.

The $40.6M price tag is quite high for a developing country like the Philippines, but with more manual labor, it can be set up a lot cheaper.

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25 new uses for old jars ("reuse involves creativity; you won't run out of ideas")

25 new uses for old jars ("reuse involves creativity; you won't run out of ideas") | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
If you have a jumble of jars that need jobs, consider calling them into service for any of these tasks.

1. Contain goopy cakes

2. Show off your souvenirs

3. Tame an unruly button collection

4. Load them up at the grocery store

5. Light a lantern

6. Create a sanctuary for succulents

7. Poach perfect eggs

8. Constrain your spools and assorted junk

9. Hatch a tiny forest

10. Whip up some homemade hostess gifts

11. Create a cloche for crafted treasures

12. Bring a salad to work

13. Sprout sprouts

14. Swing a chandelier

15. Construct a parfait

(and many more ....)


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, February 12, 2015 7:33 PM

"Given the choice, most of us treehugging types will opt for a product that comes housed in glass rather than plastic. There's the satisfying heft of a jar, the clink in the shopping cart, the lack of leaching chemicals, and the ease of recycling ... among other things.

"Glass jars rock. But perhaps one of their most beguiling traits is also one of their most bedeviling: Their potential for reuse.

"Because although the possibilities are many, the empty jars – eagerly waiting to fulfill some type of practical function – seem to proliferate like rabbits in the cabinet.

"They're too useful to toss, but how many applications do you actually employ them in? If you have a jumble of jars that need jobs, consider calling them into service for any of the following tasks."

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How expiring fruits and veggies can help end hunger ("preserving food before it rots extends use")

How expiring fruits and veggies can help end hunger ("preserving food before it rots extends use") | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
How do you feed 9 billion people by 2050? Graduate students propose to extend the life of about-to-expire fruits and vegetables

.

Freeze-drying food can preserve micronutrients, thus helping people, especially children, reduce the risk of hunger and malnutrition.

No complex machinery is needed aside from the one used in freeze-drying the product, making it less expensive compared to other consumables used by several organizations. The target price for selling is only $2 (P80).

FoPo will take advance of the strict regulations requiring companies to sell their expiring produce by buying these from them at a cheaper price and transporting them to the processing facility to freeze-dry them.

Before selling to retailers and organizations, the freeze-dried products are put through a simple pulverizer to convert them into powder form.

Once purchased, consumers can use these powdered fruits and vegetables in making food products such as healthy juices, porridges, and even sandwich spreads.

The concept won in the recently concluded Thought For Food Challenge on February 14, 2015 in Lisbon, Portugal. The event encouraged members of the food industry to come up with social entrepreneurship business ideas to help address the problem of food insecurity.

Gerard Marin, one of the two Filipino members of the team, said that the concept is also effective especially in emergency situations.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, March 19, 2015 10:49 PM

Another great idea that can be used to reduce food waste.

"The creators of FoPo emphasized that food insecurity does not come from the lack of food. To address hunger, the problems in the existing food system should be fixed.

“The world does not need to produce more food to feed the population,” Marin said. “People just have to see the value from the inefficiency of the current food system, and create a sustainable, innovative, and socially relevant business out of it.”

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Good news! Another ‘Zero Waste’ grocery store opens in France ("new behavioral options make a diff")

Good news! Another ‘Zero Waste’ grocery store opens in France ("new behavioral options make a diff") | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
High quality bulk ingredients, as long as you bring your own container -- sounds like my kind of dream store!

At day by day, there is no packaging; all 450 products are sold loose. You must bring your own containers or use the ones “graciously provided by other clients,” according to the website. This helps both the planet and one’s wallet, since we often pay for fancy excessive packaging without even realizing it. Bigorgne told La Voix du Nord that, in some cases, her package-free products are 40 percent cheaper than what you would pay in a conventional store, despite being of higher quality.

You can buy precisely the quantity of food that you want. “If you need only a single spoonful of coffee or two cinnamon sticks, I’ll sell it to you,” Bigorgne says. The idea is to reduce the amount of food waste that gets thrown away by selling exactly what a person will use. (An estimated 24 percent of calories produced globally are wasted, and that number is much higher in the U.S.)

This is not a new concept; it’s the way that many of our grandparents shopped. They would take a jar to the corner store to have it filled with however much of a particular ingredient they needed or could afford. While we enjoy a much greater selection of food than previous generations did, it is unfortunate that we’ve moved so far away from the bulk shopping model and the acceptance of reusable containers in stores.


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, February 25, 2015 1:33 AM

New options in consumer behavior patterns make far better sense in finding sustainable solutions to the waste problem. The banning of plastic has not made a dent in our garbage volume. The latest MMDA data shows a 20% increase in Metro Manila landfill waste volume. We must be attacking the problem the wrong way.

"Stores like day by day show that the trend may be changing. Hopefully North America will take a lesson from Europe’s more forward-thinking grocery models and start realizing that there is another way to shop that doesn’t involve vast quantities of plastic packaging waste."

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How Reducing Food Waste Could Ease Climate Change ("there is a direct link which you may not know")

How Reducing Food Waste Could Ease Climate Change ("there is a direct link which you may not know") | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
The energy used to produce wasted food generates more than 3.3 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide.

More than a third of all of the food that's produced on our planet never reaches a table. It's either spoiled in transit or thrown out by consumers in wealthier countries, who typically buy too much and toss the excess. This works out to roughly 1.3 billion tons of food, worth nearly $1 trillion at retail prices.

Aside from the social, economic, and moral implications of that waste—in a world where an estimated 805 million people go to bed hungry each night—the environmental cost of producing all that food, for nothing, is staggering.

The water wastage alone would be the equivalent of the entire annual flow of the Volga—Europe's largest river—according to a UN report. The energy that goes into the production, harvesting, transporting, and packaging of that wasted food, meanwhile, generates more than 3.3 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide. If food waste were a country, it would be the world's third largest emitter of greenhouse gases, behind the U.S. and China.

We tend to take our food for granted in the developed world. Since food is so plentiful, we aren't aware of the tremendous amount that's wasted and the impact that has on world hunger, political stability, the environment, and climate change. Yet when it comes to looking for ways to curb greenhouse gas emissions, food wastage is a relatively easy fix—the low-hanging fruit, so to speak—and it is literally rotting on our tables. It doesn't require any new technology, just more efficient use of what we already have. 


Via Bert Guevara
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Bert Guevara's curator insight, January 28, 2015 9:53 PM

What can we do to minimize food waste? We can attack it from two fronts:

1. Governments can enact food safety standards where they don't exist. This will jump-start the system to properly transport and store perishable foods like meat, fish, dairy, and produce. ...

2. We can all take small steps that will accumulate to make a meaningful difference. Let's buy just the food we need so we throw away less. Let's accept that produce can be top quality and delicious even if it has a slight imperfection in appearance. Let's bring meals home that we don't finish in restaurants. Small changes will yield big results.

Rescooped by Emmanuel Baeten from The Great Transition
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Infinite happiness

Infinite happiness | Blue Economy | Scoop.it
Measuring happiness and letting it grow infinitely just as we used to do with GDP does not absolve economic activity from its ecological and societal impacts.

Via Willy De Backer
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Willy De Backer's curator insight, December 30, 2014 3:57 AM

Thought-provoking article on the need for new 'beyond GDP' indicators questioning the 'happiness' as the new economic goal narrative. Reichel is right that 'beyond GDP' debate has diverted the discussion from issue of growth, but throws away baby with the bathwater. When shelving GDP, we need an alternative. Maybe happiness is too subjective as a goal. What about 'quality of life'?