Africa, Asia and Australia
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AFRICA - Enel Green Sees Africa as ‘Next Big Place’ for Renewables - Bloomberg

Enel Green Sees Africa as ‘Next Big Place’ for Renewables
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Area & Geography - This article demonstrates the interest that Africa attracts because of its emerging markets and landscapes conducive to taking advantage of the renewable energy market. Enel Green Power, the clean energy company majority owned by Italy’s largest utility, wants to expand into Africa and find similar success like it has in Latin America. The company believes the Rift Valley has a huge geothermal potential.

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AFRICA - Rwanda: Death and Identity in Rwanda

AFRICA - Rwanda: Death and Identity in Rwanda | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it
[African Arguments] I don't know why I keep them, but I have never been able to just throw them away. Two small green folded cards found at a road block ...
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Society - This article explains the storied divide between Hutu and Tutsi tribes in Rwanda from where it began to where it is now. The author claims colonial rule upset the balance, as both the Germans and Belgians in the area had elevated one group above the other, which now causes conflict. He believes that the world often neglects to cover Rwandan issues from a journalistic standpoint, as other events in South Africa or Somalia seemingly decrease the significance of horrible Rwandan homicides, etc.

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AFRICA - Nigeria overtakes South Africa to become Africa's largest economy

AFRICA - Nigeria overtakes South Africa to become Africa's largest economy | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it
Complicated statistical recalculation adds $240bn to the economy - the equivalent of finding six Ghanas within Nigeria, says Tolu Ogunlesi
Jenny & Marc's insight:

Economy - This article reports on a long overdue reevaluation of the statistical economic strength of Nigeria, which now is recognized to be stronger/larger than that of South Africa. The complicated recalculation adds $240 billion to the economy, which is equivalent to finding six Ghanas within Nigeria. This finding will attract new corporate investors to Nigeria, though the common people probably won't benefit.

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Australia: New studies reject market-based education | TheAge.com.au

Australia: New studies reject market-based education | TheAge.com.au | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it

Only 6000 words really matter in the 24-page document, yet they're enough to demolish claims made by politicians and critics of schools about the way to solve the innumerable problems that teachers face every day.


Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jenny & Marc's insight:

Intellectual/Arts -  This article shows that the level of education in Australia is dramatically decreasing. The article Is saying that Australia needs a more developed and a higher learning system for children. 

 

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Ally Clark/Mayse Thao's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:14 AM

Education in Australia, being reformed....?

delaneygrimes-sarahmcfadyen's comment, October 4, 2013 11:34 AM
The main summarization of this article includes that Australia was estimated/ had hoped to become one of the top-five nations by 2050 but that dream soon fell through as their education consistency became less and less. This article identifies the 3 main education problems of Australia. It also states the Australia is creating many solutions to education problems but very little actually are affecting students. The article relates to intellectual/ arts through education and states many facts that connects Australia to the rest of the world.
delaneygrimes-sarahmcfadyen's curator insight, October 4, 2013 12:07 PM

 

The main summarization of this article includes that Australia was estimated/ had hoped to become one of the top-five nations by 2050 but that dream soon fell through as their education consistency became less and less. This article identifies the 3 main education problems of Australia. It also states the Australia is creating many solutions to education problems but very little actually are affecting students. The article relates to "intellectual/ arts" through education and states many facts that connects Australia to the rest of the world.

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Indigenous Traditions - Australian Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders

Religion Origins Australia has two indigenous peoples – Aborigines and Torres Strait Islanders It is not possible to speak of one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander religion as there were many T

Via Aaron rai and tommy morin
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Religion- This article talks about the two main indigenous traditions, and all of their rituals and beliefs. It briefly explains the history of the traditions, and  specific things they do in their rituals.

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Aaron rai and tommy morin's curator insight, October 4, 2013 11:32 AM

Religion

 

This article helps illustrate diverse religions in Australia. This article was chosen to represent cultural people in Australia.

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Social media is improving health literacy in Australia's indigenous population

Social media is improving health literacy in Australia's indigenous population | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it

Around the world, social media is a disrupting and transforming force, bringing new opportunities for innovation and participation.1 In the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have developed resources to provide guidance on using social media in health communication.2 In the United Kingdom, the NHS Institute for Innovation and Improvement encouraged its staff to explore the potential of using social media to transform care and staff engagement.

 

In Australia, the Indigenous health sector has been at the forefront of innovative use of social media for advocacy, public health promotion and community development. Two striking examples are the Lowitja Institute’s nuanced explanation of knowledge exchange from Indigenous perspectives4and the Healing Foundation’s engaging explanation of the impact of colonisation on Indigenous health.

 

The National Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation (NACCHO) was an early adopter of social media, and finds it a valuable advocacy tool, according to its Chair, Justin Mohamed. It distributes daily Aboriginal health news alerts via social media. Mohamed says downloads of NACCHO’s policy submissions have increased since they have been promoted on Twitter and other online channels.

 

The popularity of user-generated content — a hallmark of social media — is being harnessed in new tobacco control programs. These include the No Smokes campaign from the Menzies School of Health Research and the Rewrite Your Story initiative by Nunkuwarrin Yunti (a community-controlled service). In New South Wales, the Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council uses Facebook to promote sexual health and smoking cessation.

While the digital divide is thought to be an issue relevant to remote and hard-to-reach communities, social media has been successfully used in the Torres Strait Islands to connect young people with a public health initiative in sexual health — the Kasa Por Yarn (“just for a chat”) campaign, funded by Queensland Health. Unpublished data show that Facebook, YouTube and text messaging were effective in reaching the target audience of 15–24-year-olds (Heather Robertson, Senior Network Project Officer, Cairns Public Health Unit, Queensland Health, personal communication). Patricia Fagan, a public health physician who oversaw the campaign, says that social media helped increase its reach. The campaign was using tools with appeal to young people, and, importantly, “it didn’t feel like health, it felt like socialising”. Heather Robertson, the project leader, says engaging local writers, musicians and actors in developing campaign messages and social media content was also important.

 

Social media has also been used to increase engagement with the Heuristic Interactive Technology network (HITnet), which provides touch-screen kiosks in Indigenous communities and in prisons. The kiosks embed health messages in culturally based digital storytelling. Helen Travers, Director of Creative Production and Marketing for HITnet, says this has brought wider health benefits, by developing the content-creation skills of communities. “The exciting thing for health promotion is that this kind of work is increasing digital literacy and digital inclusion”, she says.

 

Social media’s facilitation of citizen-generated movements is exemplified by the @IndigenousX Twitter account, where a different Indigenous person tweets every week, enabling many health-related discussions.

 

Innovation in service development is also being informed by the anti-hierarchical, decentralised nature of social media. The Young and Well Cooperative Research Centre is developing virtual mental health resources for Indigenous youth in remote communities. The centre’s Chief Executive Officer, Jane Burns, envisages that these will resemble a social network more than a health care intervention, and will link young people and their health care providers with online collection of data about sleep, weight, physical activity and related measures. Burns says, “It really is . . . creating a new mental health service, a new way of doing things that empowers the individual, rather than being that top-down service delivery approach”.

 

However, barriers to wider use of social media exist. Burns says that upskilling health professionals is critical. Kishan Kariippanon, a former paediatric physician studying social media and mobile phone use among youth in the Yirrkala community in Arnhem Land, says health professionals need support and encouragement to engage more creatively with technological innovations. He would like to see regular “hackathons” to bring together programmers, health professionals, innovators and community members to encourage “out of the box” thinking


Via Plus91
Jenny & Marc's insight:

Social- Social media and the Internet influences the indigenous people to adopt the modern public services. 

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KaitlynandSydney's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:19 PM

This article fits into the social category because it talks about how social media is helping promote health issues

Kiann and Kenneth's curator insight, October 3, 2013 1:27 PM

This article relates to the socal interaction in Australia.

 

Social Media in Australia is popular. Social websites like twitter, Facebook, YouTube and more. Social media is changing our health in the way you sleep, your weight, and physical activity.

Geography Jordan & Danielle's curator insight, October 4, 2013 1:22 PM

Social media ia disrupting a big in AustraliaAustralia

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Australia's New Prime Minister Vows to Bolster Coal Industry As Environmental Groups Denounce Coal Exports

Australia's New Prime Minister Vows to Bolster Coal Industry As Environmental Groups Denounce Coal Exports | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it
Coal mining has powered the Australian economy for decades. In recent years, thanks to the seemingly insatiable energy appetite of China and other Asian countries, Australia’s coal industry has been ...

Via Jocelyn Stoller
Jenny & Marc's insight:

Economic - This article displays Australia's economic dependency on coal and other natural minerals it has in abundance.

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Emil Bodnar's curator insight, October 3, 2013 12:49 PM

Economic

James and Drew's curator insight, October 3, 2013 12:52 PM

The prime minister of Australia is proposing a national carbon tax, because of the countries huge coal productions. This article is about the topic of economics.

 

Emil Bodnar's comment, October 3, 2013 1:06 PM
This article represents the economic category and the Australian industry
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AFRICA - National Museum of African Art | Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa

AFRICA - National Museum of African Art | Earth Matters: Land as Material and Metaphor in the Arts of Africa | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it
Jenny & Marc's insight:

Intellect & Arts - This exhibition argues that Africa is not just a place of conflict, but also a place of a deep artistic history. It educates people on the wide variety of African art. The exhibition tries to divert the attention away from African conflict, political and economical strife, and toward the value of African culture.

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AFRICA - CAR's peacemakers

AFRICA - CAR's peacemakers | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it
Leading Christian and Muslim clerics in the Central African Republic (CAR) are at the forefront of a campaign to end conflict among their followers, writes the BBC's Tim Whewell.
Jenny & Marc's insight:

Religion - This article chronicles the story of the war-torn Central African Republic, and how two of its leaders are attempting to reconcile Christians and Muslims in a country characterized by religious conflict. What the two religious leaders are trying to attempt is unbelievably difficult. Their country is the scene of what the United Nations (UN) has called ethnic and religious cleansing on a massive scale, given that Muslims have been murdered and hundreds of thousands forced to flee the country by a militia that is usually described as Christian.

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AFRICA - KUNA : France vows to protect Muslims, others, threatened in Central Africa - Politics - 08/04/2014

AFRICA - KUNA : France vows to protect Muslims, others, threatened in Central Africa - Politics - 08/04/2014 | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it
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Politics - This article details communal violence in the Central African Republic and its significance to overseas nations, like France, that may take action to secure those in danger. Mainly Muslim populations are under regular and sustained attack by hostile Christian militias. Humanitarian organizations have warned of "ethnic cleansing" taking place in the Central African Republic. However, France considers displacing populations under serious threat a last resort.

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Future of religion questioned as atheists gather - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

Future of religion questioned as atheists gather - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation) | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it
Religion will be a non-event in Australia within two generations according to the head of the country's atheist foundation.

Via NANCY PETERS
Jenny & Marc's insight:

Religion- This article is talking about how religion has a strong impact on children, because religion threatens them  to believe in such  horrid things.  This is one of the main reasons why many people are turning into Athiests. 

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Cameron & Sam's curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:11 AM

This article represents religion. This article is about how some people believe religion will be basically eliminated from Australia 

Kaleigh & Lauren:)'s curator insight, October 3, 2013 11:30 AM

This article fits under the religions category because it talks about how in a few decades religion might not even exist in Australia because several people are becoming atheist in Australia.

Olga Varlamov's curator insight, October 8, 2013 7:32 PM

I put this article under religion because it talks about how Australia will soon become an atheist country. Slowly religion in Australia has began to die out and based on studies, religion there will only continue to decrease.

 

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Antarctic ice shelves melt from below | Climate News Network

Antarctic ice shelves melt from below | Climate News Network | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it

There’s much more of an iceberg under the water than above it. And, it turns out, there’s much more happening beneath the surface to Antarctic ice shelves than anyone had guessed.

 

A team of researchers from British, Dutch and US universities has found that more ice leaves Antarctica by melting from the underside of submerged ice shelves than was previously thought, accounting for as much as 90% of the ice lost in some areas.

 

Iceberg production and melting results in 2,800 cubic kilometres of ice leaving the Antarctic ice sheet annually. Most is replaced by snow falling on the continent, but any imbalance means a change in global sea level.

 

Scientists have believed for decades that the main way this loss occurred was through iceberg calving, as huge chunks of ice broke off at the edge of a glacier.

 

But the team, led by academics at the University of Bristol, UK, with colleagues from Utrecht University in the Netherlands and the University of California, has used satellite and climate model data to prove that the melting of the shelves’ undersides has as large an impact as iceberg calving for Antarctica as a whole, and for some areas is far more important.

 

The findings, published in the journal Nature, are crucial to understanding how the ice sheet interacts with the rest of the climate system, particularly the ocean.

 

During the last decade the Antarctic ice sheet has been losing an increasing amount of volume. The annual turnover of ice equals 700 times the UK’s yearly domestic water usage of just four cubic kilometres a year.

 

The researchers found that, for some ice shelves, melting of their underbellies could account for as much as 90% of the mass loss, while for others it was only 10%.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Jenny & Marc's insight:

Area/Geography - Antartica's physical landscape is changing in size and shape due to climate change.

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Zoe and Eleanor's curator insight, October 4, 2013 12:55 PM

Antarctica's ice shelves are melting. This article explains what's going on around antarctica. 

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The crowded chasm: the place of science in the Australian government - The Guardian

The crowded chasm: the place of science in the Australian government - The Guardian | Africa, Asia and Australia | Scoop.it
The Guardian
The crowded chasm: the place of science in the Australian government
The Guardian
Bitter debate raged about the science and politics of climate change, with Rudd having retreated from a planned emissions trading scheme.

Via VERONICA LESTER
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Political - This article shows that Australia's government is being pushed towards an increased emphasis on science and science spending.

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