Innovation in ELT
772 views | +0 today
Follow
Innovation in ELT
English language teaching, digital apps and collaborative learning.
Curated by anacf3
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by anacf3 from Digital Delights for Learners
Scoop.it!

Helping students at schools, in libraries and at home find relevant content online

Helping students at schools, in libraries and at home find relevant content online | Innovation in ELT | Scoop.it
Helping students at schools, in libraries and at home find relevant content online. Search the web for results matched to reading age level. Over 6 million indexed pages from trusted site sources. Sources checked by teachers for relevance to the curriculum.

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by anacf3 from Digital Delights
Scoop.it!

Mobile Pedagogy for English Language Teaching: A Guide for Teachers


Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Lucy Haagen's curator insight, November 4, 2015 7:27 AM

Great variety of practical suggestions grounded in good theory

Rescooped by anacf3 from Learning & Technology News
Scoop.it!

Innovations in learning technologies for English language teaching

Innovations in learning technologies for English language teaching | Innovation in ELT | Scoop.it
Innovations in Learning Technologies for English Language Teaching starts by considering the following contexts of language learning: primary, secondary and adult learners, then different specialist areas: Business English, English for Specific Purposes and English for Academic Purposes, and finally the assessment of language using technology. Each chapter embeds a number of real-life case studies into a framework of research. The chapters show some of the development of the field, and a wide range of technologies is covered.

Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, May 1, 2017 7:09 AM

A very useful free ebook from the British Council.

Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, May 10, 2017 12:54 PM
a useful e-book 
 
Andres Gomez's curator insight, November 24, 2017 4:57 AM
The innovation in learning technologies for Enlgish language teaching is one the principal facts where the future teachers have to work in order to be able to guide and implement good lesson to the modern students because we are involve in a new era in which technology go hand by hand with the motivation for students at the moment to study also it helps to teacher to implement interesting classes for each students to creat a good environment to learn and teach
Rescooped by anacf3 from Inovação Educacional
Scoop.it!

5 Ways Digital Connectivity is Revolutionising Education

5 Ways Digital Connectivity is Revolutionising Education | Innovation in ELT | Scoop.it

If some of us recall our time at schools or university, then we would be amazed by the levels of classroom and lecture hall technology today.
Gone are the blackboards of yesteryear. Instead, many schools and higher education institutions are using a range of connected devices, both at school and at home, as part of a wireless revolution in the education sector.
With the growth of automation, cyber-security and AI, the role that technology will play in the education sector is already shaping a future job market. In preparation for these new advancements, schools and students will need to adapt to a constantly changing way of digital learning.
Here Performance Networks discuss 5 ways digital connectivity is revolutionising the education sector, as well as offering insight into how digital learning technology will shape schools in the future.
Mobile Learning
A study by Common Sense Media revealed that almost half of all young children in the UK have their own tablet, and kids spend over two hours a day looking at screens. It’s clear that the immersive and on-demand nature of smartphones and tablets are radically changing the way early-learners are accessing knowledge and information. In order to shape teaching and tailor to preferred learning methods amongst younger students, the adoption of cloud and app-based learning will need to be a topic of focus in years to come.
Enhanced Interactive Learning Methods
Teachers are able to bring up a YouTube clip to demonstrate a topic or play a podcast at the click of a button. Presentation software and hardware, such as interactive whiteboards, are becoming increasingly impressive these days. Personal and interactive learning methods are being integrated into teaching and when combined with wireless networks in schools, allow students to experience truly engaging learning experiences.
A Wealth of Online Courses
An abundance of information on online courses are now easily available as resources for both students and teachers. From websites like The Open University to Open Learn, distance learning for a variety of different subject disciplines has never been more accessible. With over 50% of the UK workforce predicted to work remotely by 2020, the growth of online courses and accessibility are encouraging online participation for students both young and old – which will ultimately lead to an improved skills gap and economy for all.
Cloud-Based Collaboration
Sharing documents across cloud-based apps means that students are now able to collaborate on group projects from a range of different locations and at different times, giving plenty of flexibility to the way they work. In fact, hosting information using cloud-based services even benefits the school or university, by reducing the number of servers required and using free software such as Google Apps. Essential documents for a piece of coursework can be accessed quickly, without having to trek back to the library.
Connected from Any Location
Wireless networks in schools and universities have enabled students and staff access to information across large sites. This is especially important for universities that are spread across different campuses. Students are able to gain access to learning resources from anywhere – even at home. Staff can share information on portals, ensuring they’re up to date with key news. Homework or coursework can even be submitted online through school portals, saving teachers valuable time too.


Via Luciano Sathler
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by anacf3 from Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
Scoop.it!

It's time to commit to digital citizenship! by Nicole Krueger

It's time to commit to digital citizenship! by Nicole Krueger | Innovation in ELT | Scoop.it
In an era of fake news and increasingly bitter political polarization, it’s time for teachers to move beyond online safety and teach students how to use technology to make their world and communities better. Share how you will commit to digital citizenship using #digcitcommit.

Via Tom D'Amico (@TDOttawa) , Susan Myburgh
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by anacf3 from Learning & Technology News
Scoop.it!

Integrating technology into English language teaching

Integrating technology into English language teaching | Innovation in ELT | Scoop.it

We’ve built an educational culture around this kind of indoctrination. But now that students have much greater access to a wider range of opinion, it has become much harder for educational establishments to maintain a specific bias in terms of what is or isn’t a fact.


Via Nik Peachey
more...
Nik Peachey's curator insight, June 20, 2016 5:37 AM

Part of an interview I gave for The Hindu.

Viljenka Savli (http://www2.arnes.si/~sopvsavl/)'s curator insight, June 21, 2016 8:38 AM
" Technology has a huge potential to transform education on a global scale, but we need to ensure that this is done in a way that will empower people and open their minds to new possibilities, rather than prescribe and control what and how they think." - true facts and musts ...
Rescooped by anacf3 from Digital Delights for Learners
Scoop.it!

50 Incredibly Useful Links For Learning & Teaching The English Language

50 Incredibly Useful Links For Learning & Teaching The English Language | Innovation in ELT | Scoop.it
50 Incredibly Useful Links For Learning & Teaching The English Language

Via Ana Cristina Pratas
more...
Aprendiendo juntos's curator insight, January 25, 2016 9:43 AM

añada su visión ...

Noel Bernabed Cruz Hernandez's curator insight, February 3, 2016 6:16 AM

añada su visión ...

Luis Ocampo's curator insight, May 5, 2016 1:24 PM
This article provide us uselful links to take advantage of the lots of resources that technology offers for learning and teaching English. We can share these tools with our students and colleagues in order to make our task as educators and leaerners a little bit easier. 
Rescooped by anacf3 from Metaglossia: The Translation World
Scoop.it!

Britain may be leaving the EU, but English is going nowhere - EconoTimes

Britain may be leaving the EU, but English is going nowhere - EconoTimes | Innovation in ELT | Scoop.it
After Brexit, there are various things that some in the EU hope to see and hear less in the future. One is Nigel Farage. Another is the English language.

In the early hours of June 24, as the referendum outcome was becoming clear, Jean-Luc Mélenchon, left-wing MEP and French presidential candidate, tweeted that “English cannot be the third working language of the European parliament”.

This is not the first time that French and German opinion has weighed in against alleged disproportionate use of English in EU business. In 2012, for example, a similar point was made about key eurozone recommendations from the European Commission being published initially “in a language which [as far as the Euro goes] is only spoken by less than 5m Irish”. With the number of native speakers of English in the EU set to drop from 14% to around 1% of the bloc’s total with the departure of the UK, this point just got a bit sharper.

Translation overload

Official EU language policy is multilingualism with equal rights for all languages used in member states. It recommends that “every European citizen should master two other languages in addition to their mother tongue” – Britain’s abject failure to achieve this should make it skulk away in shame.

The EU recognises 24 “official and working” languages, a number that has mushroomed from the original four (Dutch, French, German and Italian) as more countries have joined. All EU citizens have a right to access EU documents in any of those languages. This calls for a translation team numbering around 2,500, not to mention a further 600 full-time interpreters. In practice most day-to-day business is transacted in either English, French or German and then translated, but it is true that English dominates to a considerable extent.

The preponderance of English has nothing to do with the influence of Britain or even Britain’s membership of the EU. Historically, the expansion of the British empire, the impact of the industrial revolution and the emergence of the US as a world power have embedded English in the language repertoire of speakers across the globe.

Unlike Latin, which outlived the Roman empire as the lingua franca of medieval and renaissance Europe, English of course has native speakers (who may be unfairly advantaged), but it is those who have learned English as a foreign language – “Euro-English” or “English as a lingua franca” – who now constitute the majority of users.

According to the 2012 Special Eurobarometer on Europeans and their Languages, English is the most widely spoken foreign language in 19 of the member states where it is not an official language. Across Europe, 38% of people speak English well enough as a foreign language to have a conversation, compared to 12% speaking French and 11% in German.

The report also found that 67% of Europeans consider English the most useful foreign language, and that the numbers favouring German (17%) or French (16%) have declined. As a result, 79% of Europeans want their children to learn English, compared to 20% for French and German.

Too much invested in English

Huge sums have been invested in English teaching by both national governments and private enterprise. As the demand for learning English has increased, so has the supply. English language learning worldwide was estimated to be worth US$63.3 billion (£47.5 billion) in 2012, and it is expected that this market will rise to US$193.2 billion (£145.6 billion) by 2017. The value of English for speakers of other languages is not going to diminish any time soon. There is simply too much invested in it.

Speakers of English as a second language outnumber first-language English speakers by 2:1 both in Europe and globally. For many Europeans, and especially those employed in the EU, English is a useful piece in a toolbox of languages to be pressed into service when needed – a point which was evident in a recent project on whether the use of English in Europe was an opportunity or a threat. So in the majority of cases using English has precisely nothing to do with the UK or Britishness. The EU needs practical solutions and English provides one.

English is unchallenged as the lingua franca of Europe. It has even been suggested that in some countries of northern Europe it has become a second rather than a foreign language. Jan Paternotte, D66 party leader in Amsterdam, has proposed that English should be decreed the official second language of that city.

English has not always held its current privileged status. French and German have both functioned as common languages for high-profile fields such as philosophy, science and technology, politics and diplomacy, not to mention Church Slavonic, Russian, Portuguese and other languages in different times and places.

We can assume that English will not maintain its privileged position forever. Who benefits now, however, are not the predominantly monolingual British, but European anglocrats whose multilingualism provides them with a key to international education and employment.

Much about the EU may be about to change, but right now an anti-English language policy so dramatically out of step with practice would simply make the post-Brexit hangover more painful.

Andrew Linn has received funding from the Leverhulme Trust and from the Arts and Humanities Research Council for work on English in Europe.

Andrew Linn, Pro-Vice-Chancellor and Dean of Social Sciences and Humanities, University of Westminster

This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article.

Via Charles Tiayon
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by anacf3 from Digital Collaboration and the 21st C.
Scoop.it!

Reinventing Online Courses: What Students Want Most Out of Online Learning 

Reinventing Online Courses: What Students Want Most Out of Online Learning  | Innovation in ELT | Scoop.it

"In a recent article by The Chronicle of Higher Education, What Do Students Want From Online Courses?, the publication examines the findings of a study conducted by Learning House and Aslanian Market Research. The study focused on the wants and needs of students enrolled in online courses- from what mediums they learn with, to the support services they are offered."


Via EDTECH@UTRGV, Susan Myburgh
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by anacf3 from Research_topic
Scoop.it!

Five ways eTwinning can transform students, teachers and schools

Five ways eTwinning can transform students, teachers and schools | Innovation in ELT | Scoop.it
From helping students become global citizens, to giving teachers a community of like-minded professionals, eTwinning can improve many areas of school life

Via Artur Coelho
more...
No comment yet.