Bipolar Disorder
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» Caffeine and Bipolar Disorder - Being Beautifully Bipolar

» Caffeine and Bipolar Disorder - Being Beautifully Bipolar | Bipolar Disorder | Scoop.it
I used to be an avid coffee drinker, like, for years I had my morning latte or cup of hazelnut coffee and perhaps a pick-me-up in the afternoon. I drink my
Dalton Tuor's insight:

One of the best things for Bipolar is just going to be straight up treatment with a psychologist.  You are completely right when talk about how caffeine may make your mood unpredictable. Drugs can boost someones bipolar disorder whether the drug is an upper or a downer (Renes, 2014).  Mood disorders also have a huge roll in this, if someone is experiencing mood disorders simalar to bipolar caffeine or other substances probably is not the best idea. A simple way to think of mood disorders is psychological disorders characterized by emotional extremes. See major depressive disorder, mania, and bipolar disorder. (Myers, 2014). It can affect any type of group of people in any way, for example, lets say a friend is very calm and quite. He starts drinking caffeine to juice himself up all the time. After awhile he has drank so much caffeine that he needs to start taking drugs to calm himself down. After awhile this person will develop bipolar disorder because their mood will be fluctuating so much. 


References:


Joannes W Renes (j.renes@altrecht.nl) Eline J Regeer (e.regeer@altrecht.nl) Trijntje YG van der Voort (n.vandervoort@ggzingeest.nl) Willem A Nolen (w.a.nolen@psy.umcg.nl) Ralph W Kupka (r.kupka@ggzingeest.nl). (2014, February 18). Treatment of bipolar disorder in the Netherlands and concordance with treatment guidelines: study protocol of an observational, longitudinal study on naturalistic treatment of bipolar disorder in everyday clinical practice. 

 

Myers, D. G., & Myers, D. G. (2008). Exploring psychology in modules. New York, NY: Worth Publishers.

 

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A trip into bipolar brains - The Week Magazine

A trip into bipolar brains - The Week Magazine | Bipolar Disorder | Scoop.it
A new study suggests intriguing structural differences between the brains of Type I and Type II bipolar disorder sufferers
Dalton Tuor's insight:

At first reading this article I received great insight on the differences of type I and type II bipolar in the brain. But then i discovered that the article suggests that there are significant differences in the physical structure of their brains. Type I sufferers have somewhat smaller brain volume, while those with Type II appear to have less robust white matter.  Myers textbook suggests that brain volume does not have to do with intelligence or with IQ. Brian volume is simply about the humans size (Myers, 2014). This would mean the argument in this article is not consistent.  Even though someone with bipolar may have mania episodes, it is still not yet proven that people who suffer form bipolar decease are any less intelligent than people who don't suffer from the disorder (Cheney, 2014) 


References:


Cheney, T. (2013, January 1). An Insider's Tips: How NOT To Treat Bipolar Disorder | Psychology Today. Retrieved from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-bipolar-lens/201301/insiders-tips-how-not-treat-bipolar-disorder

 

 

 

Myers, D. G., & Myers, D. G. (2008). Exploring psychology in modules. New York, NY: Worth Publishers.


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Depressive episodes hard to treat in continuous cycling bipolar disorder - News-Medical.net

Depressive episodes hard to treat in continuous cycling bipolar disorder - News-Medical.net | Bipolar Disorder | Scoop.it
Patients with bipolar disorder who switch directly between mania and depression without a period of euthymia have a poor response to short-term antidepressant treatment, study findings indicate.
Dalton Tuor's insight:

I have found an scholarly article that proves by an experiment that Bipolar can be treated. Therefor this information is not consistent. The scholarly Article that I have found states that if treatment is done correctly patients being treated by bipolar can be affected by the treatment at any time (Nolan, 2014). It depends on the type of person you are treating most of the time and the type of treatment being used but for the most part things vary (Nolan, 2014).  Bipolar disorder can be described as a mood disorder in which the person alternates between the hopelessness and lethargy of depression and the overexcited state of mania (Myers, 2014). It can be affected right away in a good way with the right treatment. 


References:


Joannes W Renes (j.renes@altrecht.nl) Eline J Regeer (e.regeer@altrecht.nl) Trijntje YG van der Voort (n.vandervoort@ggzingeest.nl) Willem A Nolen (w.a.nolen@psy.umcg.nl) Ralph W Kupka (r.kupka@ggzingeest.nl). (2014, February 18). Treatment of bipolar disorder in the Netherlands and concordance with treatment guidelines: study protocol of an observational, longitudinal study on naturalistic treatment of bipolar disorder in everyday clinical practice. Retrieved from http://web.b.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.westminstercollege.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=32&sid=a2bf823b-675f-43cb-a6fd-b4e5b6dd5985%40sessionmgr112&hid=106

 

 

Myers, D. G., & Myers, D. G. (2008). Exploring psychology in modules. New York, NY: Worth Publishers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


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How Smartphone Apps Can Treat Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia - Wired

How Smartphone Apps Can Treat Bipolar Disorder and Schizophrenia - Wired | Bipolar Disorder | Scoop.it
A slew of mental health apps are coming out of academic institutions, research clinics and a number of start-ups. They all seek to facilitate the management of serious mental illnesses—such as severe depression, bipolar disorder and schizophrenia.
Dalton Tuor's insight:

The information provided from this article seems to be reasonable. The best thing to do for someone who is diagnosed with bipolar mania is to keep there mine occupied and to keep things stable. If they are not kept stable it may result into death. At least 25-50% of bipolar individuals attempt suicide at least once; (Cheney, 2014

Recent studies on collaborative care programs for bipolar disorders show that patients treated in speciality programs have less manic symptoms and spent less time in manic episodes compared with patient treated with care as usual (Nolan, 2014). I think if a smart phone app can show the patient how to cope with the bipolar triggers it should help them! 


References 


Cheney, T. (2013, January 1). An Insider's Tips: How NOT To Treat Bipolar Disorder | Psychology Today. Retrieved from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-bipolar-lens/201301/insiders-tips-how-not-treat-bipolar-disorder



Joannes W Renes (j.renes@altrecht.nl) Eline J Regeer (e.regeer@altrecht.nl) Trijntje YG van der Voort (n.vandervoort@ggzingeest.nl) Willem A Nolen (w.a.nolen@psy.umcg.nl) Ralph W Kupka (r.kupka@ggzingeest.nl). (2014, February 18). Treatment of bipolar disorder in the Netherlands and concordance with treatment guidelines: study protocol of an observational, longitudinal study on naturalistic treatment of bipolar disorder in everyday clinical practice. Retrieved from 

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Brains of Young Bipolar Patients Who Try Suicide - WebMD

Brains of Young Bipolar Patients Who Try Suicide - WebMD | Bipolar Disorder | Scoop.it
Scans found evidence of less connection between areas that control emotion, motivation and memory
Dalton Tuor's insight:

The information in this article seems to be consistent with the information I have found in an article. Suicide with bipolar is very common.Especially  in younger kids now a days. this article stated that "Roughly 4 percent of Americans have bipolar disorder. Of those with the disorder, 25 percent to 50 percent attempt suicide, and 15 percent to 20 percent die of suicide." I found in my article that the annual average suicide rate of bipolar people is 10-20 times that of the general population; (Cheney, 2014).  I believe this can be caused from major depressive disorder. It is a mood disorder in which a person experiences, in the absence of drugs or a medical condition, two or more weeks of significantly depressed moods, feelings of worthlessness, and diminished interest or pleasure in most activities (Myers, 2014). 


References: 


Cheney, T. (2013, January 1). An Insider's Tips: How NOT To Treat Bipolar Disorder | Psychology Today. Retrieved from http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-bipolar-lens/201301/insiders-tips-how-not-treat-bipolar-disorder

 

 

 

Myers, D. G., & Myers, D. G. (2008). Exploring psychology in modules. New York, NY: Worth Publishers.

 

 


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Depressive and Bipolar Disorders: Crash Course Psychology #30

 You can directly support Crash Course at http://www.subbable.com/crashcourse Subscribe for as little as $0 to keep up with everything we're doing. Also, if y...
Dalton Tuor's insight:

Great insight on this video, I learned quite a bit of bipolar mania from this. The biggest thing to take away from this video i though was delusions. Delusions is false beliefs, often of persecution or grandeur, that may accompany psychotic disorders. (Myers, 2014). I completely agree with this video in which women are diagnosed with bipolar disorder more than men, but this is because often women tend to see treatment more than men do. The best way to treat bipolar is to go in and see a psychologist. Drugs are usually not the answer when treat bipolar (Nolan, 2014).  This matches up with the information provided in the video. If I had to educate someone on bipolar in 10 minutes i would definitely have them watch this video! 

 

References: 

 

Joannes W Renes (j.renes@altrecht.nl) Eline J Regeer (e.regeer@altrecht.nl) Trijntje YG van der Voort (n.vandervoort@ggzingeest.nl) Willem A Nolen (w.a.nolen@psy.umcg.nl) Ralph W Kupka (r.kupka@ggzingeest.nl). (2014, February 18). Treatment of bipolar disorder in the Netherlands and concordance with treatment guidelines: study protocol of an observational, longitudinal study on naturalistic treatment of bipolar disorder in everyday clinical practice. Retrieved from http://web.b.ebscohost.com.ezproxy.westminstercollege.edu/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?vid=32&sid=a2bf823b-675f-43cb-a6fd-b4e5b6dd5985%40sessionmgr112&hid=106

 

Myers, D. G., & Myers, D. G. (2008). Exploring psychology in modules. New York, NY: Worth Publishers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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» Caffeine and Bipolar Disorder - Being Beautifully Bipolar

» Caffeine and Bipolar Disorder - Being Beautifully Bipolar | Bipolar Disorder | Scoop.it
I used to be an avid coffee drinker, like, for years I had my morning latte or cup of hazelnut coffee and perhaps a pick-me-up in the afternoon. I drink my
Dalton Tuor's insight:

One of the best things for Bipolar is just going to be straight up treatment with a psychologist.  You are completely right when talk about how caffeine may make your mood unpredictable. Drugs can boost someones bipolar disorder whether the drug is an upper or a downer (Renes, 2014).  Mood disorders also have a huge roll in this, if someone is experiencing mood disorders simalar to bipolar caffeine or other substances probably is not the best idea. A simple way to think of mood disorders is psychological disorders characterized by emotional extremes. See major depressive disorder, mania, and bipolar disorder. (Myers, 2014). It can affect any type of group of people in any way, for example, lets say a friend is very calm and quite. He starts drinking caffeine to juice himself up all the time. After awhile he has drank so much caffeine that he needs to start taking drugs to calm himself down. After awhile this person will develop bipolar disorder because their mood will be fluctuating so much. 


References:


Joannes W Renes (j.renes@altrecht.nl) Eline J Regeer (e.regeer@altrecht.nl) Trijntje YG van der Voort (n.vandervoort@ggzingeest.nl) Willem A Nolen (w.a.nolen@psy.umcg.nl) Ralph W Kupka (r.kupka@ggzingeest.nl). (2014, February 18). Treatment of bipolar disorder in the Netherlands and concordance with treatment guidelines: study protocol of an observational, longitudinal study on naturalistic treatment of bipolar disorder in everyday clinical practice. 

 

Myers, D. G., & Myers, D. G. (2008). Exploring psychology in modules. New York, NY: Worth Publishers.

 

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