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Manufacturing a solution to planet-clogging plastics : Wyss Institute at Harvard

Manufacturing a solution to planet-clogging plastics : Wyss Institute at Harvard | Bioplastics | Scoop.it
Wyss Institute at Harvard
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Coleoptera plastic made of beetles by Aagje Hoekstra

Coleoptera plastic made of beetles by Aagje Hoekstra | Bioplastics | Scoop.it
Design graduate Aagje Hoekstra has developed a plastic using insect shells.
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Wood you believe it? Solvay launches bioplastic for packaging

Wood you believe it? Solvay launches bioplastic for packaging | Bioplastics | Scoop.it
Solvay has introduced a bioplastic manufactured using wood pulp from Sustainable Forestry Initiative (SFI)’s forests’ for injection moulding.
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Le shrilk, inspiré de la cuticule des insectes, pourrait remplacer un jour le plastique

Le shrilk, inspiré de la cuticule des insectes, pourrait remplacer un jour le plastique | Bioplastics | Scoop.it

"Shrilk" : nouveau matériau.
Il est issu d'un labo d’ingénierie "biologiquement inspirée" et a des caractéristiques proches de celles d'insectes - résistant, biodégradable, léger - et pourrait remplacer le plastique…

 

Wyss Institute. « Inspired by Insect Cuticle, Wyss Researchers Develop Low-Cost Material with Exceptional Strength and Toughness »

 

[...]

 

« Natural insect cuticle, such as that found in the rigid exoskeleton of a housefly or grasshopper, is uniquely suited to the challenge of providing protection without adding weight or bulk. As such, it can deflect external chemical and physical strains without damaging the insect's internal components, while providing structure for the insect's muscles and wings. It is so light that it doesn't inhibit flight and so thin that it allows flexibility. Also remarkable is its ability to vary its properties, from rigid along the insect's body segments and wings to elastic along its limb joints. »

 

« Insect cuticle is a composite material consisting of layers of chitin, a polysaccharide polymer, and protein organized in a laminar, plywood-like structure. Mechanical and chemical interactions between these materials provide the cuticle with its unique mechanical and chemical properties. By studying these complex interactions and recreating this unique chemistry and laminar design in the lab, Fernandez and Ingber were able to engineer a thin, clear film that has the same composition and structure as insect cuticle. The material is called Shrilk because it is composed of fibroin protein from silk and from chitin, which is commonly extracted from discarded shrimp shells. »

 

[Image] « Shrilk is similar in strength and toughness to an aluminum alloy, but it is only half the weight. Shown here is a replica of an insect wing, which was made with the new material. »

 

 

 


Via Bernadette Cassel
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Bernadette Cassel's curator insight, January 8, 2014 4:28 PM


Source : Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University


Rescooped by Jean-François Kleinfinger from Protein Alternatives: Insects as Mini-Livestock - #InsectMeal
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Movie: bioplastic and red ink made from insects | design | Deezen

Movie: bioplastic and red ink made from insects | design | Deezen | Bioplastics | Scoop.it
Design graduates Aagje Hoekstra and Evelien Crooy show us the bioplastic and ink made from insects that they presented at Dutch Design Week 2013.

Via Ana C. Day
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Les emballages font leur grande révolution bio - La Tribune.fr

Les emballages font leur grande révolution bio - La Tribune.fr | Bioplastics | Scoop.it
Les emballages font leur grande révolution bio La Tribune.fr On s'intéresse alors aux biopolymères à perméabilité sélective qui laissent passer des gaz comme l'oxygène, la vapeur d'eau et le gaz carbonique », poursuit Nathalie Gontard, directrice...
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