Biomimicry
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Biomimicry
Nature inspired innovation
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Intelligent Biocides and ‘Air Lubrication’: Biomimicry in the Shipping Industry

Intelligent Biocides and ‘Air Lubrication’: Biomimicry in the Shipping Industry | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"From a whale shark keeping unwanted freeloaders off its skin to water droplets rolling off a duck’s feathers, nature has many ingenious ways of keeping surfaces clean. The science of biomimicry, or biomimetics, seeks to harness nature’s cleverest capabilities which have taken aeons to evolve. Scientists at AkzoNobel, a global paints and coatings company, are using principles derived from nature to develop coatings that protect surfaces such as the hulls of cargo ships. And other heavy industries such as rail are experimenting with biomimicry."

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Biomimetics in Shaving

Biomimetics in Shaving | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Based on friction tests of surfaces mimicking the textures evolved on frog, cricket and salamander feet, Technion scientists innovate a way to significantly improve the shaving process. Technion scientists discovered a way to significantly improve shaving process, following friction tests of surfaces mimicking the textures evolved on frog, cricket and salamander feet."

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Waterproof Surface is 'Driest Ever'

Waterproof Surface is 'Driest Ever' | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"US engineers have created the "most waterproof material ever" - inspired by nasturtium leaves and butterfly wings. The new "super-hydrophobic" surface could keep clothes dry and stop aircraft engines icing over, they say."

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Controlling Wettability: 'Sticky tape' for Water Droplets Mimics Rose Petal

Controlling Wettability: 'Sticky tape' for Water Droplets Mimics Rose Petal | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

A new nanostructured material may lead to surfaces that stay dry forever, never need cleaning and are able to repel bacteria and even prevent mold and fungi growth. "The newly discovered material uses raspberry particles -- so-called because of their appearance -- which can trap tiny water droplets and prevent them from rolling off surfaces, even when that surface is turned upside down," said Dr Andrew Telford from the University's School of Chemistry and lead author of the research recently published in the journal, Chemistry of Materials. The raspberry particles mimic the surface structure of some rose petals.

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Joanna Aizenberg - Extreme Biomimetics

Joanna Aizenberg displays fascinating processes in nature, and shares with us how we can mimic these processes to improve our daily lives..

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Nature Inspires a New Multifunctional Glass Surface

Nature Inspires a New Multifunctional Glass Surface | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Inspired by nature, a group of researchers from MIT developed a glass that is self-cleaning, virtually eliminates reflections, and resists fogging and glare...
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Characterization of the Topography and Wettability of English Weed Leaves and Biomimetic Replicas

Characterization of the Topography and Wettability of English Weed Leaves and Biomimetic Replicas | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

In a recent paper published in Journal of Bionic Engineering, researchers from BERG-IBB studied the topography and wettability of the underside of English weed (Oxalis pes-caprae) leaves using epoxy replicas created via a two-step casting process. Leaves were found to be close to super hydrophobic due to the presence of a characteristic pattern of irregular 100 µm – 200 µm × 60 µm convex papillae. The water repellency properties of such microstructured surfaces may have important applications, including self-cleaning, anti-microbial and anti-fouling.

 

Photo details: SEM image of an epoxy replica of the leaf of English weed. P.M. Pereira, 2013.


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Physicists Work Out Why Wet Skin Wrinkles

Physicists Work Out Why Wet Skin Wrinkles | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"If you have ever sat in the bath and wondered why your fingers go wrinkly when wet, it is because the dead outer layer of your skin is made up of matrix-like structures called corneocytes. They let the skin absorb water easily when wet, yet quickly become much less permeable to moisture when conditions are dry. Physicists in Germany have now modelled a corneocyte and carried out calculations to see how its volume changes as it takes up water. As well as providing important information about how our skin reacts to its surroundings, the new work could help researchers to develop new materials, such as fabrics, that mimic the properties of skin."

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Arjen ten Have's comment, February 7, 2014 10:02 AM
This explains how it works, nothing to do with why. This was elucidated last year or thereabouts. Wrinkling of hands (and feet which are basically clumsy hands) result in inclreased sliding resistance, hence, things becomes less slippery when wet!
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Springtails Inspire Great Leap in Super Materials

Springtails Inspire Great Leap in Super Materials | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Norwegian researchers are using insights from the animal kingdom in their quest to design new self-cleansing and water-repellant surface materials.
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Cicada Wing Surface Biomimicry Could Lead to Anti-bacterial Surfaces

Cicada Wing Surface Biomimicry Could Lead to Anti-bacterial Surfaces | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"An international research group of researchers Australia's Swinburne University of Technology and Spain’s Universitat Rovira i Virgili investigated cicada insect and came up with a discovery that may lead to a surface able to destroy bacteria solely through its physical structure."

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Laurence's curator insight, March 12, 2013 8:41 AM

"...Une découverte qui pourrait déboucher sur un revêtement auto-destructeur de bactéries, de part sa seule structure physique ...des tests confirment toutefois que le système de défense sous forme de nanopiliers de la cigale, n'est vraiment efficace que contre les bactéries à membrane suffisamment souple..."

Si ces recherches aboutissent, imaginons les applications : poignées de porte, écrans tactiles, combiné de téléphone, sièges dans les transports publics et, pourquoi pas, emballage alimentaire ...? les bactéries sont partout !

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Spider Hairs Biomimicry for Hydrophobic Surfaces

Spider Hairs Biomimicry for Hydrophobic Surfaces | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Engineering researchers have created what they say is a “nearly perfect hydrophobic interface” by mimicking spiders. By using plastic to reproduce the shape and patterns of the minute hairs that grow on the bodies of spiders, the researchers have created one of the most water-phobic surfaces yet.

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