Biomimicry
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Antireflection with Moth Eye Structures

Antireflection with Moth Eye Structures | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Screens on even the newest phones and tablets can be hard to read outside in bright sunlight. Inspired by the nano­structures found on moth eyes, researchers led by Shin-Tson Wu of the Uni­versity of Central Florida have developed a new anti­reflection film that could keep people from having to run to the shade to look at their mobile devices. The anti­reflection film exhibits a surface reflec­tion of just 0.23 percent, much lower than the surface reflection of usual phones of 4.4 percent.
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Nature Inspired Self-cleaning Windows Developed

Nature Inspired Self-cleaning Windows Developed | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"UCL researchers have developed a revolutionary new type of ‘smart’ window which could cut window-cleaning costs in tall buildings while reducing heating bills and boosting worker productivity. The windows use nature inspired nanostructures which mimic the eyes of moths to cut glare, save energy and clean themselves."

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Bge Innovation's curator insight, January 25, 2016 3:18 PM

un nouveau verre associant nano structures en cônes et dioxyde de vanadium, pour éviter salissures, éblouissement et échanges thermiques

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Moths' Method Of Flying Through Dark May Help Engineers Build Tiny Flying Robots

Moths' Method Of Flying Through Dark May Help Engineers Build Tiny Flying Robots | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Hawkmoths are able see in the dark, and now, researchers know how they do it. This ability allows them to track the movements of flowers blowing in the wind, even at night, as the insects hover in the air.

Manduca sexta, roughly the size of a hummingbird, were studied by researchers using infrared cameras as they traveled between mechanical flowers. As the team varied light conditions, they also altered the speed at which the artificial flowers swayed from side to side. They then recorded how well the proboscis (feeding probe) of the insects stayed within the target flower. The moths are able to slow down their brains while seeking nectar, improving their eyesight under conditions of low visibility, the study found. While their minds are working on reduced speed, the creatures are also able to maintain rapid flapping of their wings and maintaining complex flight characteristics."

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How a Moth's Eye Could Help Improve the Efficiency of Solar Cells

How a Moth's Eye Could Help Improve the Efficiency of Solar Cells | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The eyes of nocturnal moths contain a series compound lenses: micro lenses called ommatidia which are themselves patterned with a nanoscale dome-shaped bumps. These structures naturally help reduce reflection of light at a wide range of wavelengths, enabling better night vision to help moths navigate in the dark. [...] The ability to capture light and not let go is appealing in the world of solar cells because it can increase efficiency. So the team from Singapore has taken inspiration from the complex lens structure to create a process that stamps patterns over the surface of a material, replicating the antireflective effects of the moths' eyes. "

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Moth Eyes Inspire More Efficient Photoelectrochemical Cells

Moth Eyes Inspire More Efficient Photoelectrochemical Cells | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"As nocturnal creatures, moths need to maximize how well they can see in the dark whilst remaining less visible to avoid predators. This ability to collect as much of the available light as possible and at the same time reflect as little as possible, has inspired Researchers at the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) to design a new type of photoelectrochemical cell using relatively low cost materials."

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Inspired by Moth Eyeballs, Chemists Develop Gold Coating That Dims Glare

Inspired by Moth Eyeballs, Chemists Develop Gold Coating That Dims Glare | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Moth eyeballs are made up of tiny cones that reduce glare. UC Irvine researchers copied the pattern on a new, flexible material and coated it with a bit of gold to make a product that could improve solar panels, LED displays and disguising of weapons."

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Moth Eyes Inspire More Efficient Thin-Film Solar Cells

Moth Eyes Inspire More Efficient Thin-Film Solar Cells | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Moth eyes have evolved to cut out light reflection so that it can see well at night. Scientists have created a nanofilm that mimicks the moth's eye to enhance solar cell efficiency.
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Moth-inspired Anti-reflective Plastics to be Commercialized

Moth-inspired Anti-reflective Plastics to be Commercialized | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Researchers from A*STAR’s IMRE and their commercial partners used nanoimprint technology to produce new anti-reflective and anti-glare plastics.
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Moth Eyes Inspired the Design of This Hypersensitive Camera

Moth Eyes Inspired the Design of This Hypersensitive Camera | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"If you wanted to see in the dark, you could do worse than follow the example of moths, which have of course made something of a specialty of it. That, at least, is what NASA researchers did when designing a powerful new camera that will capture the faintest features in the galaxy."

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Communicating in Nature's Language

Communicating in Nature's Language | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Centuries of research and billions of dollars of investment have effectively brought humanity under the dominance of ‘1’ and ‘0’. Concurrently, millennia of evolution have seen a different language develop in the natural world: one of singular value and purpose. While the language of digital communication — radio, television, internet, wireless — has defined ‘Hello’ as the cumbersome ‘01001000 01000101 01001100 01001100 01001111’, a the bio-chemical world will represent it by a single molecule."

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Moth Eyes, Lotus Leaf Biomimicry To Boost Solar Efficiency

Moth Eyes, Lotus Leaf Biomimicry To Boost Solar Efficiency | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

The atomic structure of a moth’s eye and lotus leaves have inspired scientists to create a new glass coating that could increase the efficiency of solar panels by up to six per cent. “While lotus leaves repel water and self-clean when it rains, a moth’s eyes are antireflective because of naturally covered tapered nanostructures where the refractive index gradually increases as light travels to the moth’s cornea,” said Tolga Aytug, member of ORNL’s Materials Chemistry Group. “Combined, these features provide truly game-changing ability to design coatings for specific properties and performance.”"

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Nano-imprint Technology Could Revolutionize TVs, Drugmaking

Nano-imprint Technology Could Revolutionize TVs, Drugmaking | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Nano-imprint technology, a technique in which microscopic indentations are made on an object's surface, is changing the nature of various products, including TV screens, semiconductors and tissue cultures. One application already being used is in making so-called moth-eye film, a transparent film developed by Dai Nippon Printing that reflects almost no light. This film is modeled after a moth's eyes, which are known for reflecting little to no light, allowing the insect to better hide from predators. This is achieved by minute bumps that are around 200 nanometers, 200 billionths of a meter, in diameter. Nano-imprint technology helped researchers create such surfaces on film."

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Biomimicry in Lighting Design

Biomimicry in Lighting Design | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Check out these [nature-inspired] developments in solar energy and LED lighting. So many possibilities yet to be discovered."

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Roboticists Discover the Secret of Insect Flight, and it's Not Wings

Roboticists Discover the Secret of Insect Flight, and it's Not Wings | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
When it comes to insect flight, we usually only think about how the insect's wings contribute to aerial stability. But scientists have now discovered that the abdominal movements of some insects also play a large role in flight control, particularly when hovering — a finding that could lead to improved aerial drones.
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Nanostructures Modelled Like Moth Eyes May Boost Medical Imaging

Nanostructures Modelled Like Moth Eyes May Boost Medical Imaging | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

Using the compound eyes of the humble moth as their inspiration, an international team of physicists has developed new nanoscale materials that could someday reduce the radiation dosages received by patients getting X-rayed, while improving the resolution of the resulting images.

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Silkmoth Inspires Novel Explosive Detector

Silkmoth Inspires Novel Explosive Detector | Biomimicry | Scoop.it
Imitating the antennas of the silkmoth, Bombyx mori, to design a system for detecting explosives with unparalleled performance is the feat achieved by a French research team.
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