Biomimicry
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Boxfish Shell Inspires New Materials for Body Armor and Flexible Electronics

Boxfish Shell Inspires New Materials for Body Armor and Flexible Electronics | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"The boxfish’s unique armor draws its strength from hexagon-shaped scales and the connections between them, engineers at the University of California, San Diego, have found. They describe their findings and the carapace of the boxfish (Lactoria cornuta) in the July 27 issue of the journal Acta Materialia. Engineers also describe how the structure of the boxfish could serve as inspiration for body armor, robots and even flexible elctronics."

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Oyster Shell May Inspire ‘Natural Exoskeleton’ Armor

Oyster Shell May Inspire ‘Natural Exoskeleton’ Armor | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

""We often think of seashells as being defined by their delicate beauty. But what if they also hold the secret to producing near-impenetrable human body armor? Researchers from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology say the structure of a certain oyster shell could inspire extremely tough and lightweight exoskeletons..."

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3D-Printed Fish Scales May Improve Military Armor

3D-Printed Fish Scales May Improve Military Armor | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Human body armor has come a long way since the steel-plated suits of the Middle Ages, but protective animal structures — such as some shells and scales — still beat the most sophisticated man-made gear in terms of mobility and rigidity. Researchers at MIT are now using3D printing to bring humans up to speed with their animal kin by studying some of the sturdiest forms of animal armor, particularly fish scales, to design gear that matches the flexibility, comfort and durability found in the natural world."

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Engineers Find Inspiration for New Materials in Piranha-proof Armor

Engineers Find Inspiration for New Materials in Piranha-proof Armor | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

It’s a matchup worthy of a late-night cable movie: put a school of starving piranha and a 300-pound fish together, and who comes out the winner? The surprising answer—given the notorious guillotine-like bite of the piranha—is Brazil’s massive Arapaima fish. The secret to Arapaima’s success lie in its intricately designed scales, which could provide “bioinspiration” for engineers looking to develop flexible ceramics.

 

See also: http://www.insidescience.org/?q=content/piranha-proof-armor-inspires-tough-materials/742

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3D Printed Fish Scales Inspire Human Armor Development

3D Printed Fish Scales Inspire Human Armor Development | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Another incredible adaptive animal and insect feature is the development of protective scales that provide insulation, and serve as a camouflage to ward off predators. In fact, animal scale functioning is so impressive that recently “dermal modification” — or the adaptive properties of animal skins — has inspired the scientific development of human armor using 3D printing."

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Yves Bonis's curator insight, February 27, 2015 4:08 AM

Très inspirant... d'autant qu'on doit pouvoir en faire autre chose que des armures. Allons au-delà du simple fac simile des fonctions du vivant et je crois que nous pourrons nous inclure correctement dans l'avenir du monde.

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Flexible Armadillo-Inspired Armor Can Take A Hit

Flexible Armadillo-Inspired Armor Can Take A Hit | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

"Animals like crocodiles and armadillos have natural armor that’s basically a bunch of hard plates embedded in soft tissues. A team of mechanical engineers led by McGill University associate professor Francois Barthlat dveloped a new material that mimics this protection."

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Mantis Shrimp May Hold the Secret to Lighter, Tougher Body Armors

Mantis Shrimp May Hold the Secret to Lighter, Tougher Body Armors | Biomimicry | Scoop.it

The mantis shrimp is a fascinating creature that has the ability to punch its prey into submission with a club that accelerates underwater at around 10,400 g (102,000 m/s2). By studying the secrets behind this formidable weapon, a Californian researcher hopes to develop an innovative, hi-tech material that is one third the weight and thickness of existing body armor.

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