Biomedical engineering
22 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by David C-F
Scoop.it!

Bionic implants raise ethical questions › News in Science (ABC Science)

Bionic implants raise ethical questions › News in Science (ABC Science) | Biomedical engineering | Scoop.it
David C-F's insight:

Australian researchers were trying to repair spinal cords be regrouping them with tiny bionic implants and saw what happened to the Nano scale. While the researchers worked on that a group of philosophers worked on learning more about how the public felt about bionic research being used to enhance human memory, physical abilities and perception. The bionics program at ARC Center of Excellence for Electro materials Science are developing flexible conduction polymers that can implanted that are used to interact with living cells. The polymers are packed with growth factors that are to encourage nerve cells to grow in labs. Philosophers worry that people who have disabilities will only get discriminated against more when they have bionic implants. Also philosophers are wondering if the research is worth the money. This article is important because it is questioning the ethics something that is still pretty new. It's also important because it gives more information on how bionics can be used to benefit humans.            

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David C-F
Scoop.it!

The Artificial Pancreas Gets Real - ASME

The Artificial Pancreas Gets Real - ASME | Biomedical engineering | Scoop.it
A new device for diabetes care reduces risks of automated insulin control. It’s the closest thing on the market to the long-sought artificial pancreas.
David C-F's insight:

Living with diabetes every day is very hard but it can also be risky at nighttime. One of the effects of diabetes is "Dead in Bed" syndrome, were someone goes to bed then they don't wake up the next morning. This phenomenon is responsible for one in twenty unexplained diabetes deaths. Many doctors suspect hypoglycemia, low blood sugar, to be the cause of this, but it can't be proved by autopsies. Even if people control their body's glucose levels during the day they are still vulnerable during nighttime. The technology that is used to prevent this is called the artificial pancreas. This device has a glucose monitor and an insulin pump so it can act just like a real pancreas. When body insulin production is natural low like during sleep the pump will continue to keep pumping insulin. This devise is really helpful because it can be used to help many diabetics. Since there is a very large amount of people with diabetes in our country it will be especial helpful hear. It is important because it is a long term solution to diabetes. This answers my research question because it gives an example of how engineering can be used to replace a function that some people lack. 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by David C-F
Scoop.it!

Once More, with feeling

Once More, with feeling | Biomedical engineering | Scoop.it
David C-F's insight:

As a result of war technology is boosted causing certain fields of science and engineering to become better funded. One field that was largely benefited was the science of prosthetic limbs.  Now modern prosthetic limbs are even better than they were before so they can move more fluidly and have controllable fingers. Also some artificial arms and legs have been developed are attached to nerves in a person’s stump so they can be controlled by thoughts. Scientist has even made progress making prosthetic limbs able to transmit sensory information back to the user’s brain. This is an incredible useful type of science because it can give people back lost limbs. One can only imagine how hard it would be for someone to lose an arm or a leg and have to go through such a huge change. But if we can make new arms or new legs for these people they won't have to go through such a big change. This answers my research question because it is about building lost appendages for those who need them.

 

more...
Worth Loomis's comment, April 4, 2014 7:42 AM
The goal of the article is to show the advancement of prosthetic limbs over the years. The author did a wonderful job of explaining the differences between prosthetic limbs today versus other the past. The field of prosthetic limbs is an admirable field of study. In addition, to using prosthetic limbs for functional use. But Scientist have made advancements in this field by transmitting sensory information back to the user’s brain. Working with prosthetic is an unbelievable career to help those in need. The author did an excellent job of explaining the advancements in this growing field and by showing who would benefit from this new information.
Scooped by David C-F
Scoop.it!

Bionic limbs will one day sense the grass under prosthetic feet - CNET

Bionic limbs will one day sense the grass under prosthetic feet - CNET | Biomedical engineering | Scoop.it
With the first thought-controlled bionic leg pioneered in Chicago, the next steps for smart prosthetics are refining them for widespread use and tackling a huge hurdle: sensory feedback.
David C-F's insight:

Artificial limbs can not only move, flex, and feel but now can respond to a person’s thoughts and even translate sensory feedback like feeling grass beneath one's feet. Support from the US military has boosted the resent advancements in the field of bionic in an effort to improve the lives of wounded veterans. Companies like the Rehabilitation Institute of Chicago (RIC) have been building the next generation of artificial limbs. Last year RIC made the first thought-controlled robotic leg that could climb up to 103 flights of stairs. The team behind making the leg combined bionic hardware with a new technology called targeted muscle reinnervation surgery which is use to give the brain access to the bionic limbs through nerves that are rerouted to healthy muscles. These thought-controlled limbs are on the beginning. The ultimate goal of this research is to make low cost sensory enabled limbs that use implants that get even more precise movement. This technology is important because it is being used to help people have been disabled from some kind of injury be able to overcome that injury. This answers my research question because it shows how machines are used to help people move again.

more...
Matthew Slomka's comment, April 9, 2014 11:13 AM
This is very cool. If we can give the ability for vets to be able to feel and walk just as they did before, this would be a great step in the right direction toward helping them.
Dale Saini's comment, April 9, 2014 11:28 AM
I agree with Slomka
Sean Spangard's comment, April 10, 2014 11:07 AM
This gives hope to a large number of people who never thought they would again be able to function normally
Scooped by David C-F
Scoop.it!

Bionics — National Geographic Magazine

Bionics — National Geographic Magazine | Biomedical engineering | Scoop.it
The blind can see, a one-armed woman can fold her shirts.
David C-F's insight:

Amanda Kitts is a woman who has run day-cares for almost twenty years and she has a prosthetic arm. She is proof that even though flesh and bone maybe gone there are still nerves and parts of the brain that once controlled it are alive. Kitts is part of the "tomorrow's people", a group of people who have lost or destroyed body parts that have been replaced by devices that can respond to brain commands. Other people like Eric Schremp, who shattered his neck has an electronically device that allows him to move his fingers so he can grip a fork, or Anna Lewis, who is blind but can see shapes of trees thanks to a tiny camera that communicates with her optic nerves are also part of the "tomorrow's people". This technology is great because it helps people who have physical disabilities overcome them. This is important because it shows how much technology can benefit humans. This answers my research question because it shows who engineering can be used to repair damaged body parts.

 

more...
No comment yet.