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Rescooped by Cath Scott from Eclectic Technology
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iBiology: Bringing the world's best biology videos to you

iBiology: Bringing the world's best biology videos to you | Biology | Scoop.it
Free online biology videos by the world's leading scientists. Includes full-length seminars, short talks on the human side of science and videos and resources for students and educators.

Via Beth Dichter
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Rescooped by Cath Scott from My Umbrella Cockatoo, TIKI
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This Super Sharp Image of a Cell's Insides Was Made With Glowing DNA

This Super Sharp Image of a Cell's Insides Was Made With Glowing DNA | Biology | Scoop.it
This looks like a bizarrely-colored aerial image of a city at night, but in reality it's something much smaller, and much more fascinating: the tiny scaffolding and organelles that make up a single human cell.

Via Troy Mccomas (troy48)
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E.coli has been turned into a biological hard drive - Geek

E.coli has been turned into a biological hard drive - Geek | Biology | Scoop.it
A new form of genetic manipulation could let simple e.coli bacteria do a huge array of jobs, seeking and reporting back data as needed.
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Rescooped by Cath Scott from Ag Biotech News
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Maths study of photosynthesis clears the path to developing new super-crops

Maths study of photosynthesis clears the path to developing new super-crops | Biology | Scoop.it

How some plant species evolved super-efficient photosynthesis had been a mystery. Now, scientists have identified what steps led to that change. Around three per cent of all plants use an advanced form of photosynthesis, which allows them to capture more carbon dioxide, use less water, and grow more rapidly. Overall this makes them over 50% more efficient than plants that use the less efficient form.

A new study has traced back the evolutionary paths of all the plants that use advanced photosynthesis, including maize, sugar cane and millet, to find out how they evolved the same ability independently, despite not being directly related to one another.

 

Using a mathematical analysis, the authors uncovered a number of tiny changes in the plants' physiology that, when combined, allow them to grow more quickly; using a third as much water as other plants; and capture around thirteen times more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere. Together, these individual evolutionary advances make up a 'recipe' that could be used to improve key agricultural crops that only use the less efficient form...


"My main interest is in using tools from maths to make some concrete progress in a problem of real biological and social value," said Dr Johnston. "Encouragingly for the efforts to design super-efficient crops, we found that several different pathways lead to the more efficient photosynthesis – so there are plenty of different recipes biologists could follow to achieve this." Dr Julian Hibberd from the University of Cambridge... added: "This is not only an interesting mathematical result, it should help biological scientists to develop crops with significantly improved yields to feed the world" ... 

 

The next step for the biologists is to recreate the natural evolution of the more advanced photosynthesis by mirroring the genetic and physiological changes in simple laboratory plants, and eventually in rice.

 

http://www3.imperial.ac.uk/newsandeventspggrp/imperialcollege/newssummary/news_17-10-2013-15-39-30

Original article: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00961


Via Alexander J. Stein
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New research shows childhood adversity causes changes in genetics - PsyPost

New research shows childhood adversity causes changes in genetics - PsyPost | Biology | Scoop.it
In a look at how major stressors during childhood can change a person's biological risk for psychiatric disorders, researchers at Butler Hospital have discovered a genetic alteration at the root of the association.

Via Dimitris Agorastos
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Evolution at warp speed: Hatcheries change salmon genetics after a single generation

Evolution at warp speed: Hatcheries change salmon genetics after a single generation | Biology | Scoop.it
The impact of hatcheries on salmon is so profound that in just one generation traits are selected that allow fish to survive and prosper in the hatchery environment, at the cost of their ability to thrive and reproduce in a wild environment.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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[US] Collections | Replaceable You: Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering - Stanford Continuing Studies Program | Genetics

[US] Collections | Replaceable You: Stem Cells and Tissue Engineering - Stanford Continuing Studies Program | Genetics | Biology | Scoop.it
“Collections | Top Collections - Everything you need to teach everything.”
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How the First Plant Came to Be

How the First Plant Came to Be | Biology | Scoop.it
A genetic analysis reveals the ancient, complex--and symbiotic--roots of photosynthesis in plants

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Cell Cycle and Cell Division | Learn Science at Scitable

Cell Cycle and Cell Division | Learn Science at Scitable | Biology | Scoop.it
The articles in this Subject space focus on mechanisms that regulate the timing and frequency of DNA duplication and cell division.

Via Dr. Stefan Gruenwald
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Tshenolo Menwe's curator insight, May 28, 2015 6:14 AM

This is very interesting for me. I mean how can something so small to the naked eye, play such an important role in one's life?

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Fungi Infecting Plants and Animals: Killers, Non-Killers, and Cell Death

Fungi Infecting Plants and Animals: Killers, Non-Killers, and Cell Death | Biology | Scoop.it
From molecules to physiology

Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Steve Marek's curator insight, September 4, 2013 12:46 PM

Hemibiotrophs have their cake and eat it too.

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Synthetic Biology: Engineered Plants Create Their Own Fertilizer

Synthetic Biology: Engineered Plants Create Their Own Fertilizer | Biology | Scoop.it

Since man discovered agriculture, farmers have used ingenious ways to pump more nitrogen into crop fields; farmers have planted legumes and plowed the entire crop under, strewn night soil or manure on the fields, shipped in bat dung from islands in the Pacific or saltpeter from Chilean mines and plowed in glistening granules of synthetic fertilizer made in chemical plants. 
A new Washington University in St. Louis project seeks to miniaturize, automate and relocate the chemical apparatus for nitrogen fixation within the plant so nitrogen is available when and where it is needed — and only then and there.
“That would really revolutionize agriculture,” said Himadri Pakrasi, PhD, the Myron and Sonya Glassberg/Albert and Blanche Greensfelder Distinguished University Professor, in Arts&Sciences, and director of the International Center for Advanced Renewable Energy and Sustainability (I-CARES) at Washington University in St. Louis.


Via Szabolcs Kósa
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Rescooped by Cath Scott from Science News
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Dog-Gone Genetics: A Few Genes Control Fido's Looks

Dog-Gone Genetics: A Few Genes Control Fido's Looks | Biology | Scoop.it
Humans have complicated genetic structures — not so dogs. Almost every physical trait in canines is controlled by just a few genes, which means custom-breeding a dog is only a matter of flipping a few genetic switches.

Via Sakis Koukouvis
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Kate Richmond's curator insight, June 10, 2013 10:38 AM

A very short, but interesting article discussing dog genetics. Could be a good tool to get students interested in genetic processes such as selective breeding, and to explain how these can interfere with genes.