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Monocots vs Dicots Explained

It is really easy to determine a monocot and a dicot. However, first, it is important to understand that monocots and dicots actually represent the two main ...
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Interactive Keys Glossary

Interactive Keys Glossary | Bio Course | Scoop.it
Image-based glossary for characters used in interactive identification keys
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Pollination syndrome - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Pollination syndromes are suites of flower traits that have evolved in response to natural selection imposed by different pollen vectors, which can be abiotic (wind and water) or biotic, such as birds, bees, flies, and so forth.[1][2] These traits include flower shape, size, colour, odour, reward type and amount, nectar composition, timing of flowering, etc. For example, tubular red flowers with copious nectar often attract birds; foul smelling flowers attract carrion flies or beetles, etc.

The "classical" pollination syndromes as they are currently defined (see below) were developed in the 19th Century by the Italian botanist Federico Delpino. Although they have been useful in developing our understanding of plant-pollinator interactions, an uncritical acceptance of pollination syndromes as providing a framework for classifying these relationships is rather out of date.[3]

These do not attract animal pollinators. Nevertheless, they often have suites of shared traits.

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Amborella - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Amborella is a genus of rare understory shrubs or small trees endemic to the island of New Caledonia. The genus consists of only a single species, Amborella trichopoda, and is the only member of the family Amborellaceae. Wood of Amborella lacks the vessels characteristic of most flowering plants. It is of great interest to plant systematists because molecular phylogenetic analyses consistently place it at or near the base of the flowering plant lineage. That is, it represents a line of flowering plants that diverged very early on (about 130 million years ago) from all the other extant species of flowering plants. Comparing characteristics of this basal angiosperm, other flowering plants and fossils may provide clues about how flowers first appeared—what Darwin called the "abominable mystery".

Amborella is a sprawling shrub or small tree up to eight meters high. It bears alternate or decussate, simple evergreen leaves without stipules. The leaves are two ranked, with distinctly serrated or rippled margins, and about 8 to 10 cm long.

The species is dioecious: each flower produces both stamens and carpels, but only one sex develops fully and is fertile in the flowers of an individual plant. The small, creamy white, inconspicuous flowers are arranged in terminal panicles of 2 to 30 flowers borne in the axils of foliage leaves. Each flower is subtended by bracts and has a perianth of tepals (undifferentiated sepals and petals) arranged in a spiral or possibly whorled at the periphery. These features suggest that, as with other basal angiosperms, there is a high degree of developmental plasticity. The bracts gradually transition into tepals, making it difficult to determine where a flower actually begins.

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