Bilingual Education: Integrating American Sign Language into the Classroom
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ASL Teachers!

ASL Teachers! | Bilingual Education: Integrating American Sign Language into the Classroom | Scoop.it
Teachers! How can you use Start ASL in your classroom?
Katie Chung's insight:

This website for a cohesive curriculum about ASL that teachers can use in their classrooms. Not only does it provide various lesson plans for teachers use, but it also allows teachers to customize what they want in their curriculum. I believe that integrating an extensive curriculum will not only allow students to become bilingual, but it also provides teachers to be familarized with how ASL should be taught. I think utilizing a curriculum like this would be extremely beneficial and would be extremely effective in helping students learn American Sign Language. 

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Haley educating the hearing people about the deaf world

My new video to educate the hearing people about the deaf world. Please watch & share! Thank you! Let me know your thoughts :)
Katie Chung's insight:

In this video, Haley gives the hearing population greater awareness about the Deaf culture and shares her frustration about the ignorance she has to face each and every day. Personally, I became pretty upset hearing about all of Haley's personal accounts with hearing people. No person deserves to be treated differently or looked down upon simply because they are deaf. Being a person who knows ASL and understands the deaf culture, I am ashamed, saddened, and frustrated when hearing people act so ignorant towards those who are deaf and hard of hearing because they don't know enough about the deaf culture. I am extremely passionate about ASL as well as deaf culture and I strongly believe that people need to be more tolerant and loving towards those who are deaf.

 

Typically hearing people intially feel bad for deaf people because they cannot hear and are quick to pity them. As a result, deaf people have a rather negative perception of hearing people because of the way that they are mistreated and misunderstood. In reality, deaf people are extremely proud of being deaf and it happens to make up a big part of thier identity. For deaf people, ASL is more than just a way to communicate: it's a culture. Deaf people see themselves no different as anyone else and sees deafness as a wonderful asset rather than a crippling deficiency. In addition, sometimes hearing people think that deaf people are "broken" and need to be fixed by getting a hearing aid. I think that deaf people should be able to embrace their deafness if they want to. Who are we to tell them what to do? I feel that integrating ASL in the classroom early on will allow children to understand more about Deaf culture and will understand that deaf people a lot better. By doing so, students will be able to grow more appreciative for the deaf culture and will prevent them from acting out in ignorance. This may cause a huge breakthrough in the relationship between hearing and deaf people and may shatter the negative perceptions that each population holds.

 

In addition, Hailey mentions how she's "been through hell in school, because of [her] hearing." It really saddens me that deaf students like Hailey are being bullied every day simply because they are deaf. She even mentions how see was treated harshly by her own teacher. As mentioned earlier, I think teaching ASL as well as the Deaf culture to students at a young age will definitely prevent deaf students from being bullied so much and will give them greater insight about what it means to be deaf.

 

Personally, I want to pass on my knowledge to my students about ASL and the deaf culture and shatter the preconcieved notions that are constantly being made about deaf people day after day. I believe that deaf people are just as capable as anyone to achieve greatness and I desire to see greater change in the way hearing people percieve and treat those who are deaf. By integrating ASL in the classroom, I strongly believe that we can change the way the deaf world percieves us hearing people and will promote greater equality and harmony  for the better. 

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American Sign Language: A New Strategy to Integrate into Your Current Teaching Practices

Katie Chung's insight:

Personally, I believe that teachers should integrate American Sign Language into the classroom because of the developmental benefits that it brings.

 

The inclusion of ASL in the classroom gives children a jump start in their language acquisition. As teachers, it is absolutely crucial to accommodate the needs of each child. In a typical classroom, each child has a preferred learning style and not all children learn the same way. In our current school system, the curriculum caters to verbal-linguistic learners and logical-mathimatical learners. By including ASL in the classroom, all learners may have an easier and more enjoyable time learning. ASL encourages movement and is extremely hands-on, which may help many children with thier ability to learn as well as build thier motor skills.

 

In addition, the integration of ASL may greatly encourage a child's language development. Many of the signs in American Sign Language are indicative of the object and look like the object that is being represented. For example, to sign the word "eat", you close your fingers so that the thumb and fore fingers are touching each other and repeatedly touch your lips. This resembles the way we constantly put food towards our lips and mouth whenever we eat. This acts as a mnemonic device, allowing words to come alive and making it easier for children to understand as well as retain words. As a result, children may have an easier time learning words because these words are being visualized and acted out. The use of ASL will not only expand and develop a child's memory, but it will also stimulate the brain and as a result encourage further brain development. 

 

 

Not only will the integration of ASL make learning more fun for children, but it also serves to further develop and encourage language development in children.

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Switched at Birth - Integrating Sign Language

Sean Berdy, Lucas Grabeel, Katie LeClerc, Vanessa Marano, D.W. Moffett & Constance Marie talk about how sign language isn't just integrated seamlessly on the...
Katie Chung's insight:

Switched at Birth, a show on ABC family, dives into the lives of two families whose lives are forever changed when they find out that not only that their children were swtiched at birth, but also figure out that one of them happens to be deaf. This show has become one of my all time favorites because of the amount of ASL that is used in the show and the fact that deaf culture is constantly being shown.

 

In this clip, the actors from the show share all about what it's like to constantly be signing in the show. Two actors from the shows happen to be deaf, while all the others are hearing. In the video, they mention how sign language is so integrated in the show that it has become part of their reality and how it's almost impossible not to learn the language because they're around it so much. They go on to share how beautiful and captivating the language is and how much they love using it. I believe that immersing students into a classroom that is filled with ASL, they will also come to love and appreciate the beauty of this language. The actors go on to mention how the cast has become a family because of the immense integration of sign language that has occurred. In the same way, our classrooms can build these types of close relationships between deaf and hearing people through the integration of ASL. The closeness between the actors is extremely evident throughout the video. I believe that including ASL in the classroom will definitely create relationships similar to those shown in this clip and I believe that children will learn to love those who are deaf and can understand that they're just like everyone else.

 

With the inclusion of American Sign Language in the classroom, I believe that this video will someday be reflected in society, where there is greater harmonious nature between those who are deaf and those who are hearing. Integrating ASL will definitely shatter the negative perceptions held by both deaf and hearing people and will bring forth lasting relationships and a stronger community.

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Deaf population of the U.S. - Deaf Statistics - LibGuides at Gallaudet University Library

LibGuides. Deaf Statistics. Deaf population of the U.S..
Katie Chung's insight:

Looking at the statistics provided by the National Association of the Deaf, 38,225,590 people in the United States alone are either deaf or hard-of-hearing. That's 13% of the population! Although only 1.81% of children between the ages 6-18 years old are deaf or hard-of-hearing, that still accounts for 691,883 children. Deaf and hard of hearing children have the right to free and public education like anyone else. As a result, there is a possibility that we may have several of these students in our classrooms. Personally, I believe that the classroom should be a place that encourages children from all different backgrounds. I believe that the inclusion of ASL will allow children with hearing loss and those without it will be able to share a commonality and actively be able to communicate with one another. In addition, I believe that school is more than just a place where children learn how to add and learn where all the states are on a US map, it serves as a place where students are constantly being enlightened and taught about the world around them. By teaching ASL to students, it enables them to communicate to deaf and hard of hearing people not only inside the classroom, but outside as well. By doing so, students will be able to appreciate and love those who are different from them and understand that we can have things in common even with those who are different. Integrating ASL in the classroom will also largely impact the students who are deaf and hard of hearing by making the classroom a more welcoming and engaging place. Those students will definitely feel more comfortable and will definitely be able to get more out of the lessons taught in the classroom. 

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