Big Stick Diplomacy
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Big Stick Diplomacy
U.S. President Theodore Roosevelt’s corollary
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Theodore Roosevelt and Big Stick Diplomacy

Annotation: This article is talking about is the interventionist foreign policy. Foreign Policy means a quote that Theodore Roosevelt said, "Speak softly and carry a big stick." He is referring to don’t be scared because the other countries have people we have guns and a lot of armor to over rule the other countries. My opinion on that quote is you’re not that big of a person but you have weapons to protect you. Theodore put the other countries that was taking over from the U.S to go to the military with out their own permission.

 

http://suite101.com/article/theodore-roosevelt-and-big-stick-diplomacy-a247936

 

Theodore Roosevelt and Big Stick Diplomacy Roosevelt's interventionist foreign policy violated the concept of constitutional government, but it also helped make America the world power it is today. Describing his foreign policy, Theodore Roosevelt quoted a West African proverb: "Speak softly and carry a big stick." As president, Roosevelt used "big stick diplomacy" to seize the initiative in handling foreign relations, which helped transform the United States into one of the most powerful nations in the world. However, Roosevelt also disregarded the Constitution’s limitations on federal power by making the executive branch supreme in foreign policy matters. This set a precedent that still exists today. Examples of Roosevelt’s disregard included: • Committing the U.S. military to foreign countries without congressional consent • Negotiating agreements with foreign dignitaries without Senate ratification The Roosevelt Corollary As European nations began expanding their spheres of influence, many attempted to interfere in Latin America. Germany had threatened to force Venezuela to pay its debts, and other European nations were pressuring the Dominican Republic to do the same. Roosevelt responded to European pressure by declaring that only the U.S. had the authority to intervene in Latin America, effectively becoming "an international police power." This declaration stemmed from Roosevelt’s belief that the U.S. should protect weaker nations in the Western Hemisphere. This became known as the Roosevelt Corollary to the Monroe Doctrine. Latin America Under Roosevelt, U.S. military personnel occupied the Dominican Republic and seized its customs houses. Future military interventions in Nicaragua, Honduras and Mexico were also undertaken, • Converting the U.S. military into the "policeman of the world" • and all were justified by the Roosevelt Corollary. • Cuba had gained independence from Spain in the Spanish-American War. When Cubans rebelled against election results in 1906, Roosevelt deployed military personnel to restore order and organize a new government without the consent of Congress. This set a precedent in which future U.S. presidents committed the military to foreign countries for "nation building" purposes without congressional approval. • When Panama revolted against ruling Colombia, Roosevelt sent warships without Congress's consent to support the Panamanians. Roosevelt recognized the hastily created Republic of Panama and a treaty was negotiated giving the U.S. the right to build the Panama Canal. • Securing the Panama Canal was Roosevelt’s greatest foreign policy achievement, but the way it was done was most likely unconstitutional. Roosevelt defended his actions by later stating: "I took the Canal Zone and let Congress debate; and while the debate goes on the Canal does also." • The Philippines • The Philippine-American War was conducted partly under Roosevelt’s leadership and almost completely without congressional consent. The U.S. had acquired the Philippines in the Spanish-American War, but when the U.S. refused to grant the islands their independence after the war, the Filipinos rebelled. This sparked a conflict that lasted over four years without Congress declaring war. Over 7,000 U.S. troops were either killed or wounded, while Filipino civilian and military deaths numbered anywhere from 250,000 to one million. • This war began a U.S. policy of intervening in countries to impose freedom upon supposedly barbaric peoples for their own good. The war also demonstrated Roosevelt’s disregard for other branches of government. • Japan • Another way in which Roosevelt disregarded the Constitution’s separation of powers was to enter into "executive agreements" with foreign countries. Unlike treaties, these agreements would not require approval from two-thirds of the Senate to go into effect. Roosevelt made many of these agreements with Japan, including allowing Japan to control Korea, to restrict Japanese immigration into the U.S., and to recognize Japan’s "special interests" in China. None of these agreements were approved by the Senate or Congress. • In 1907, Roosevelt sent the "Great White Fleet" of U.S. warships on a round-the-world voyage to demonstrate military strength. The voyage was especially meant to intimidate Japan, which was expanding into a world power. While the voyage was initially viewed as a great international success for both Roosevelt and the U.S., it encouraged Japan to accelerate naval and arms production to match America. In this way, the fleet’s voyage indirectly played a role in paving the way toward World War II. • Legacy • While Theodore Roosevelt did much to make the U.S. a world power, he did so by showing contempt not only for Congress but for the constitutional form of government established by the framers. This is partly why America today is so different than what the framers had envisioned. By using unprecedented executive power in international affairs, Theodore Roosevelt was the first modern U.S. president. • Sources • Schweikart, Larry and Allen, Michael: A Patriot’s History of the United States (New York, NY: Penguin Group, Inc., 2004) • Wallechinsky, David and Wallace Irving: The People’s Almanac (Garden City, NY: Doubleday & Co., Inc., 1975)

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Roosevelt's 'Big for Stick' speech set tone foreign policy, State Fair dining

Annotation: This article is basically talking about Theodore Roosevelt talking in his speeches he made during the Big stick diplomacy. The quote I like the most is “ If a man continually blusters, if he lacks civility, a big stick will not save him from trouble.” What this quote means to me is that a man should not be lazy and should stand up because no one would help. I kind of go by that quote I like to do everything by myself because I don’t like help but only when I need it.

 

http://brainerddispatch.com/stories/082401/sne_0824010010.shtml Roosevelt's 'Big for Stick' speech set tone foreign policy, State Fair dining

Posted: Friday, August 24, 2001 FALCON HEIGHTS (AP) -- A century ago on a visit to the Minnesota State Fair, Theodore Roosevelt made perhaps his most-quoted remark, And perhaps forever, he set the tone for state fair cuisine. "A good many of you are probably acquainted with the old proverb, 'Speak softly and carry a big stick,"' Theodore Roosevelt told fairgoers on Sept. 2, 1901. "If a man continually blusters, if he lacks civility, a big stick will not save him from trouble," Roosevelt said, "and neither will speaking softly avail, if back of the softness there does not lie strength." The 2001 State Fair, which opened Thursday, will commemorate the centennial of Teddy's Big Talk with a reenactment on Sunday, Sept. 2. Roosevelt was vice president at the time. But four days after his speech, President William McKinley was shot. He died eight days after that, and Roosevelt became chief executive. His address became known as "the Minnesota speech." Not only did the speech set the tone for Roosevelt's presidency, it just might have presaged the coming of the Pronto Pup and its progeny on small sticks, including walleye on a stick, ostrich on a stick, alligator on a stick, pickles on a stick, and new for this year, deep-fried candy bars on a stick. Historians have referred to Roosevelt's foreign policy as "big-stick diplomacy," said D. Jerome Tweton, a Roosevelt scholar and retired professor of history at the University of North Dakota. Tweton said the speech reflected Roosevelt's views, not those of his boss. "He thought McKinley was timid on foreign policy. He once said that McKinley had 'the backbone of a chocolate eclair."' Roosevelt was an early advocate of war with Spain, and as president he used the U.S. Navy as his "big stick" to get the Panama Canal built. "Panama was part of Colombia, and Colombia wouldn't cooperate and sell it," Tweton said. "When Panama declared its independence, Roosevelt sent the Navy to anchor off Panama and make sure the Colombian navy didn't show up to try to put down the revolt. Three days later, Roosevelt recognized Panama, and then he built the canal." In "Blue Ribbon," a history of the Minnesota State Fair, Karal Ann Marling wrote that "connoisseurs of speechmaking" judged Roosevelt to be a poor orator. "His gestures were too choppy and his voice too high." But even critics were taken with his forceful sincerity. Roosevelt partisans, of course, believed they had heard "the burning convictions of a mental and physical giant." Some "highlights" of the 1901 speech would raise eyebrows today. "The willfully idle man, like the willfully barren woman, has no place in a sane, healthy and vigorous community," Roosevelt said. He also reflected the prevailing attitude American Indians. "Half a century ago Minnesota and the two Dakotas were Indian hunting grounds," he said. "We committed plenty of blunders, and now and then worse than blunders, in our dealings with the Indians. But who does not admit at the present day that we were right in wresting from barbarism and adding to civilization the territory out of which we have made these beautiful states?" Roosevelt returned to the Minnesota State Fair in 1910, after he had left office, and in 1912, when he sought the presidency again as standard-bearer of his Bull Moose party (he lost to Woodrow Wilson). In 1910, a dairy sculpted Roosevelt -- in butter, of course -- wearing a pith helmet and safari clothes and with one foot planted on the neck of a buttery lion.

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The Gilded Age & the Progressive Era (1877–1917)

The Gilded Age & the Progressive Era (1877–1917) | Big Stick Diplomacy | Scoop.it
A summary of Roosevelt’s Big Stick Diplomacy: 1899–1908 in History SparkNotes's The Gilded Age & the Progressive Era (1877–1917).
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Vocabulary

Vocabulary

Foreign policy: self-interest strategies chosen by the state to safeguard

Fleet: the largest group of naval vessels under one commander, organized for specific tactical Reception: the action or process of receiving something sent, given, or inflicted

Progeny: a descendant or the descendants of a person, animal, or plant

Acquainted: make someone aware of or familiar with

Connoisseurs: an expert judge in matters of taste

Blunders: a stupid or careless mistake

Unprecedented: never done or known before

Voyage: a long journey involving travel by sea or in space

Intimidate: Frighten someone

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Great White Fleet

Annotation: Basically the article is talking about is that Theodore Roosevelt in the Big Stick Diplomacy. How Theodore Roosevelt was always a great advocate of the naval strength. He did a fleet in December 1907and brought 16 battleships and 14,000 men on a 14-month world cruise. The fleet was call the Great White Fleet because that was the standard name for the fleet at the time. They shipped to Spain, Rio de Janeiro, Chile, Peru and Magdalena Bay.

 

Mexico. http://www.u-s-history.com/pages/h942.html

Theodore Roosevelt, always a great advocate of naval strength, sent a portion of the Atlantic fleet on a world cruise beginning in December 1907. Sixteen battleships, plus auxiliary support ships and 14,000 men, embarked on a 14-month, 45,000-mile voyage for the purposes of generating international goodwill, testing naval readiness and impressing world powers with American might. Japan, in particular, was targeted; recent tensions, however, had abated to some degree with the conclusion of the Root-Takahira Agreement. Participating vessels were painted white, a matter of visual appeal and not of naval necessity. The moniker “Great White Fleet” was not used at the time, but later became the standard description of the fleet. No effort was spared to make the ships appear pristine on the exterior, but the glossy paint masked major mechanical problems in the engine rooms. Two of the ships were unable to complete the voyage. Beginning at Hampton Roads before Christmas 1907, the fleet proceeded to Port of Spain, Trinidad for the holiday. The next ports of call included Rio de Janeiro; Punta Arenas, Chile; Callau, Peru; and Magdalena Bay, Mexico. An exchange of ships occurred at San Francisco, where the fleet remained from May to July of 1908. The ships then steamed on to Honolulu; Auckland, New Zealand; Sydney and Melbourne, Australia, where huge and enthusiastic crowds gathered; and Manila. In October, several of the ships were damaged in a typhoon and one sailor was lost at sea as the fleet pushed northward. The reception at Yokohama was warm despite the underlying friction with Japan. A stop was made at Colombo, Ceylon, before steaming on to the Red Sea. The fleet tied up the Suez Canal for four days before all of the ships completed passage and then broke down into smaller contingents for the purpose of visiting various Mediterranean ports. The fleet assembled at Gibraltar before beginning the voyage home to Virginia where in February 1908, they were greeted by a beaming Roosevelt aboard the presidential yacht Mayflower and cheering thousands. The procession of warships was in some ways illusory. The resplendent fleet not only was in poor repair, but also was obsolete. The H.M.S. Dreadnought, first of the modern “all-big-gun” battleships, had been launched by the British in 1906, ushering in a new naval age. The Great White Fleet was a relic of a fading era. ________________________________________ See other foreign affairs issues under Theodore Roosevelt.

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Big Stick Diplomacy Law & Legal Definition

Big Stick Diplomacy Law & Legal Definition | Big Stick Diplomacy | Scoop.it
Big Stick Diplomacy is a nickname coined by Theodore Roosevelt in quoting the old African proverb “Speak softly and carry a big stick, and you will go far,” was the foreign policy that...
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