Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras
6.7K views | +0 today
Follow
Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras
The best out there light carrying.
Curated by Lainer
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

60mm ƒ/2.4 vs. 56mm ƒ/1.2 | Fuji vs. Fuji

60mm ƒ/2.4 vs. 56mm ƒ/1.2 | Fuji vs. Fuji | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

While these lenses are fairly close in focal length, they are clearly built for different purposes. I’ve been waiting for a portrait lens for almost a year now, ever since I sold my Nikon 85mm ƒ/1.4 AF-D. The FUJINON XF 56mm ƒ/1.2 fills that void admirably aside from the true focal length difference, and is actually usable out to the edges of the frame unlike the Nikon. Finally I can get back to portrait work. The FUJINON XF 60mm ƒ/2.4 Macro seems built for carefully considered images and precise focusing. It was always sort of a stop gap for Fujifilm shooters wanting a flattering portrait lens, and it still is the prime to beat for most flattering focal length in my view. It’s a very good lens and does what it does well, but it’s not a dedicated portrait lens, nor was it ever intended to be. I always figured I’d borrow a 60mm ƒ/2.4 for this comparison, but with the support of my awesome readers, I was able to afford to buy one, and I’m happy to have it. Not only so I can continue testing and adding to articles like these, but macro work is something I haven’t had a chance to do much of and the 60mm ƒ/2.4 is a great starting point. I can also see myself packing it instead of the 56mm ƒ/1.2 for landscape shooting since it’s so much lighter and very sharp edge to edge. 39mm filters aren’t exactly expensive either.......


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Photography Gear News
Scoop.it!

Fuji x100s Follow Up Review :: Life Without DSLRs

Fuji x100s Follow Up Review :: Life Without DSLRs | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it
I have been DSLR free for about two months and all is well. During the past two months I’ve been to Cuba, New York (x2), and Arizona. I feel I have hit just about every type, and kind, of job I do and my little Fujis have performed flawlessly.

Via Philippe Gassmann
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Ground Level - Fujifilm X-Pro1 & XF 60mm 2.4 R Macro | Rob Lowe

Ground Level - Fujifilm X-Pro1 & XF 60mm 2.4 R Macro | Rob Lowe | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

With a decent macro lens, there’s a lot to be found that’s worth shooting if you just lay on the ground and look. My shutter finger is getting itchier the further we get into the year with the ever intensifying anticipation of the coming of Spring (and all of the really good stuff that it brings with it) and it’s getting more difficult to stop myself shooting just anything and everything – however, here are a few shots that I grabbed the other day during breaks in the heavy cloud cover, from a Scottish garden. Enjoy…...


Via Thomas Menk
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Lainer from Fuji X-Pro1
Scoop.it!

Experiences Using The Fujinon XF60mm | George Greenlee

Experiences Using The Fujinon XF60mm | George Greenlee | Best Quality Mirrorless Cameras | Scoop.it

The XF 60MM lens has a bad rap. Reviews around the web will tell you that its sharper than a scorned woman’s tongue, but slower to focus in low light than a politician is in making a decision. I have had the 60mm lens since it was released, but I have not used it that much as I tend to use the 35 and 18mm most of the time. I went to San Fran for christmas and it seemed like a good opportunity to get to know the lens better. I wanted to see if the lens deserved the rap and were there ways to overcome any short comings? So this is not a lens review, just some experiences in using the lens. First let me say I cut my autofocus teeth on sport photography with a Nikon F5 and then the D2Hs, D3 etc. It was a bit of a learning curve at the start but now its second nature. My default approach is to use the AF-ON button to separate the AF  from the shutter release button. I tend use AF-C with 9 point dynamic setup. This set up gives you so much control its a godsend, I can pretty much focus and track anything and I seldom have focus failures. Now the X-Pro1 is a different beast and requires a different way of working. For the XF 35MM and 18mm for candid work I use AREA + AF-S with a single focus point. Not only does this mean I can move the focus point around to suit, it reduces focus errors. The most common Auto Focus error, and I suspect why one sees so many people on the internet claim back focus issues, is the failure to fill the focus point(s) with the subject. The AF system will then focus on the point of highest contrast, which may not be on the subject. Using a larger number of focus points with a wide angle lens means a lot of the FOV is fair game for the AF system and  the camera decides where to focus, using a single focus point means I stay in control. I only get failures on these two lenses if I can not cover the subject with that AF sensor. Note for landscape I would tend to use hyperfocal focusing biased to give better focus at infinity. This set up works well for the XF 60mm lens in high contrast situations, but in lower contrast situations it causes it to hunt a lot and fail often. There is just not enough data for the AF system to make a decision..a bit like a politician and just as annoying. Fortunately the solution is quite simple, just use more focus points and make sure to fill the frame. You do this by hitting the AF button and rotating the selector dial left to increase the number of focus points. For night time candid photography I have found that rotating it two clicks left from the single focus point setting works really well. During my night shoot in Avignon I only had two focus failures where the camera could not capture focus at all. Both of these were caused by the fact that there was no real contrast in the subject…well it is a contrast based AF system after all. Clearly you still have to make sure the subject covers the focus points or you may be disappointed, but it deals nicely with lower contrast situations. Locking focus is one thing, the speed with which it locks is another. The Fujinon XF 60MM focuses quickly in when there is lots of contrast even in low light like the night shots below, not DSLR speed but fine for candid work and I would have no hesitation in recommending it for that purpose.  For sports….well there is always the Nikon. Overall I am really enjoyed using this lens. It does not deserve a bad rep, you just need to find your own rhythm with it.....

 


Via Thomas Menk
more...
Nick Chaldakov-photographer's curator insight, January 25, 2013 1:46 AM

Thank you Gorge Greenlee for information and advice on Fuyi XF 60mm lens. 's Very useful.