Benchmarking Working Europe
68 views | +0 today
Follow
Benchmarking Working Europe
Articles corresponding to the ETUI Benchmarking Working Europe and growing inequalities
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Politiques d’austérité - La Grèce : laboratoire social pour l’Europe néolibérale ?

Politiques d’austérité - La Grèce : laboratoire social pour l’Europe néolibérale ? | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
On a longtemps cru que les plans d’ajustement structurel seraient réservés aux pays du Sud. Mais c’était sans compter sur le triomphe du néolibéralisme. Au menu : dérégulation, flexibilisation, privatisations. En Europe, la Grèce est le premier pays qui a fait les frais des politique
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

ETUI report underlines the costs of austerity

ETUI report underlines the costs of austerity | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
By Steve Coulter, LSE Just out from the European Trade Union Institute (ETUI) is ‘Benchmarking Working Europe 2014’, the ETUI’s annual stock-take of macro-economic, social and bargaining conditions...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

PoliticalEconomy.ie » Benchmarking Working Europe 2014

more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Romek Jagoda
Scoop.it!

File:Change of gross domestic product (GDP) per inhabitant, in purchasing power standard (PPS), by NUTS 2 regions, 2008 as compared with 2000.PNG - Statistics Explained

File:Change of gross domestic product (GDP) per inhabitant, in purchasing power standard (PPS), by NUTS 2 regions, 2008 as compared with 2000.PNG - Statistics Explained | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
European Works Councils Research's insight:
Dynamic catch-up process in the new Member States
Map 2: Change of gross domestic product (GDP) per inhabitant, in purchasing power standard (PPS), by NUTS 2 regions, 2008 as compared with 2000 (in percentage points of the average EU-27) - Source: Eurostat (nama_r_e2gdp)

Map 2 shows the extent to which per-inhabitant GDP changed between 2000 and 2008, compared with the EU-27 average (expressed in percentage points of the EU-27 average). Economically dynamic regions, whose per-inhabitant GDP increased by more than 3 percentage points compared with the EU average, are shown in green. By contrast, less dynamic regions (those with a fall of more than 3 percentage points in per-inhabitant GDP compared with the EU-27 average) are shown in orange and red. The range is from + 58 percentage points for Bratislavský kraj (Slovakia) to – 40 percentage points for Brussels in Belgium.

The map shows that economic dynamism is well above average in the south-western, eastern and northern peripheral areas of the EU, not just in EU-15 countries but particularly in new Member States, Croatia and some regions of Turkey.

Among the EU-15 Member States, strong growth is particularly evident in Spain, parts of the Netherlands and Greece, as well as the north of Finland and Sweden. On the other hand, weak growth that started several years ago is persisting in several EU-15 countries. Italy and France have been particularly badly hit. Not a single region achieved the EU-27 average growth rate during the eight-year period 2000–08. Performance has also been weak in a number of regions of Germany, Portugal, Sweden and the UK. Ireland is a special case. Due to the economic and financial crisis, both NUTS 2 regions fell back to the levels of 2001, i.e. by 15 percentage points, during the year 2008.

Of the new Member States, apart from the very dynamic capital regions, the Baltic States, Romania, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and most regions of Poland have seen growth markedly above the average. Croatia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia also reveal above-average economic growth for the eight-year period 2000–08.

Closer analysis of the most dynamic regions shows that 41 EU-27 regions have outperformed the EU average by more than 10 percentage points; of these, 24 are in new Member States.

The 10 fastest-growing regions are spread over nine EU Member States. Among these 10, there are five capital regions in new Member States. The three regions in EU-15 countries in this top-10 group (Luxembourg, Groningen in the Netherlands and Inner London) can all be considered special cases.

The non-capital region with the strongest growth in the new Member States was Vest (Romania), where per-inhabitant GDP (in PPS) increased by 23.8 percentage points compared to the EU‑27 average between 2000 and 2008.

At the lower end of the distribution curve, there is a clear concentration: of the 34 regions in which per-inhabitant GDP fell by more than 10 percentage points below the EU‑27 average, 13 are in Italy, six in France, five in the UK and four in Germany.

Closer examination of the new Member States yields the pleasing result that, between 2000 and 2008, only one region (Malta with– 5.8 percentage points) fell back, compared with the EU-27 average.

The catch-up process in new Member States was of the order of 1.7 percentage points per year between 2000 and 2008, compared to the EU average. Per-inhabitant GDP (in PPS) in these 12 Member States thus rose from 45 % of the EU-27 average in 2000 to almost 59 % in 2008. In 2008, performance was particularly strong, with 2.7 percentage points. This can be explained partly by the fact that the economic and financial crisis struck first in the EU-15 Member States, some of which, like Ireland, Italy and Denmark, were already in recession in 2008. On the other hand, among new Member States, only Estonia and Latvia already had negative volume growth rates in 2008, and the full effects of the crisis became apparent only in 2009. The initial data available on certain Member States for 2009 and 2010 would suggest that the recession affected rural regions and areas lagging behind in terms of economic development less severely than regions with a high per-inhabitant GDP, or with a high level of dependence on exports or tourism.

more...
European Works Councils Research's curator insight, April 11, 2013 10:03 AM
Dynamic catch-up process in the new Member States
Map 2: Change of gross domestic product (GDP) per inhabitant, in purchasing power standard (PPS), by NUTS 2 regions, 2008 as compared with 2000 (in percentage points of the average EU-27) - Source: Eurostat (nama_r_e2gdp)

Map 2 shows the extent to which per-inhabitant GDP changed between 2000 and 2008, compared with the EU-27 average (expressed in percentage points of the EU-27 average). Economically dynamic regions, whose per-inhabitant GDP increased by more than 3 percentage points compared with the EU average, are shown in green. By contrast, less dynamic regions (those with a fall of more than 3 percentage points in per-inhabitant GDP compared with the EU-27 average) are shown in orange and red. The range is from + 58 percentage points for Bratislavský kraj (Slovakia) to – 40 percentage points for Brussels in Belgium.

The map shows that economic dynamism is well above average in the south-western, eastern and northern peripheral areas of the EU, not just in EU-15 countries but particularly in new Member States, Croatia and some regions of Turkey.

Among the EU-15 Member States, strong growth is particularly evident in Spain, parts of the Netherlands and Greece, as well as the north of Finland and Sweden. On the other hand, weak growth that started several years ago is persisting in several EU-15 countries. Italy and France have been particularly badly hit. Not a single region achieved the EU-27 average growth rate during the eight-year period 2000–08. Performance has also been weak in a number of regions of Germany, Portugal, Sweden and the UK. Ireland is a special case. Due to the economic and financial crisis, both NUTS 2 regions fell back to the levels of 2001, i.e. by 15 percentage points, during the year 2008.

Of the new Member States, apart from the very dynamic capital regions, the Baltic States, Romania, Slovakia, the Czech Republic and most regions of Poland have seen growth markedly above the average. Croatia and the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia also reveal above-average economic growth for the eight-year period 2000–08.

Closer analysis of the most dynamic regions shows that 41 EU-27 regions have outperformed the EU average by more than 10 percentage points; of these, 24 are in new Member States.

The 10 fastest-growing regions are spread over nine EU Member States. Among these 10, there are five capital regions in new Member States. The three regions in EU-15 countries in this top-10 group (Luxembourg, Groningen in the Netherlands and Inner London) can all be considered special cases.

The non-capital region with the strongest growth in the new Member States was Vest (Romania), where per-inhabitant GDP (in PPS) increased by 23.8 percentage points compared to the EU‑27 average between 2000 and 2008.

At the lower end of the distribution curve, there is a clear concentration: of the 34 regions in which per-inhabitant GDP fell by more than 10 percentage points below the EU‑27 average, 13 are in Italy, six in France, five in the UK and four in Germany.

Closer examination of the new Member States yields the pleasing result that, between 2000 and 2008, only one region (Malta with– 5.8 percentage points) fell back, compared with the EU-27 average.

The catch-up process in new Member States was of the order of 1.7 percentage points per year between 2000 and 2008, compared to the EU average. Per-inhabitant GDP (in PPS) in these 12 Member States thus rose from 45 % of the EU-27 average in 2000 to almost 59 % in 2008. In 2008, performance was particularly strong, with 2.7 percentage points. This can be explained partly by the fact that the economic and financial crisis struck first in the EU-15 Member States, some of which, like Ireland, Italy and Denmark, were already in recession in 2008. On the other hand, among new Member States, only Estonia and Latvia already had negative volume growth rates in 2008, and the full effects of the crisis became apparent only in 2009. The initial data available on certain Member States for 2009 and 2010 would suggest that the recession affected rural regions and areas lagging behind in terms of economic development less severely than regions with a high per-inhabitant GDP, or with a high level of dependence on exports or tourism.

Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

BM 2011: From the Lisbon Strategy to Europe 2020: the Statistical Landscape of the Education and Training Objectives Through the Lens of the Capability Approach | Vero | Social Work & Society

BM 2011: From the Lisbon Strategy to Europe 2020: the Statistical Landscape of the Education and Training Objectives Through the Lens of the Capability Approach | Vero | Social Work & Society | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
From the Lisbon Strategy to Europe 2020: the Statistical Landscape of the Education and Training Objectives Through the Lens of the Capability Approach...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

A worsening of social inequalities in the European Union - European Public Health Alliance

A worsening of social inequalities in the European Union - European Public Health Alliance | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
A recently launched European Trade Union Institute (ETUI) and the European Trade Union Confederation (ETUC) joint report entitled (...)...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Benchmarking Working Europe 2012 | La Librairie Européenne S.A.

Benchmarking Working Europe 2012 | La Librairie Européenne S.A. | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Inequality as cause and consequence of the crisis - Green European Journal

Inequality as cause and consequence of the crisis - Green European Journal | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
Inequalities lie at both ends of the equation of the crisis. Inequality is unsustainable in many ways: it puts in danger the cohesion of our societies and it is a driving force of our unsustainable consumption model.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

GINI_State-of-the-Art_review_1.pdf?1308916502

Inequalities’ Impacts
State of the Art Review 1This report provides the fi rm foundation for anchoring the research that will be performed by the GINI project. It
subsequently considers the fi elds covered by each of the main work packages:
œ inequalities of income, wealth and education,
œ social impacts,
œ political and cultural impacts, and
œ policy effects on and of inequality.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Together - Sennett, Richard - Yale University Press

Together - Sennett, Richard - Yale University Press | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it

A book how we lost the ability to cooperate, to be solidar, to be societies as a result of neoliberal ideology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Czy potrafimy jeszcze współpracować? | Szacunek i wykluczenie - Polityka.pl

Czy potrafimy jeszcze współpracować? | Szacunek i wykluczenie - Polityka.pl | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
Społeczeństwo nie istnieje – przekonywała Margaret Thatcher – są samodzielne jednostki. Efekty neoliberalnej rewolucji lat 80. i 90. przeszły najśmielsze oczekiwania.

 

Society does not exist, Margaret Thatcher was convincing us, there are only individuals.

The article discusses results of the neoliberal revolution of the '80 and '90 and shows how its results exceeded even the boldest expectations.

It deals also with inequalities as intrinsic elements of the neoliberal ideology.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Rozwarstwienie w USA grozi buntem | Koniec mitu pucybuta - Polityka.pl

Rozwarstwienie w USA grozi buntem | Koniec mitu pucybuta - Polityka.pl | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
W Ameryce, inaczej niż w Europie, różnice majątkowe nie drażniły ludzi. Dziś jednak rozpiętość dochodów w USA bardzo wzrosła i grozi buntem.
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Romek Jagoda
Scoop.it!

What happens when you pay monkeys unequally | Equality and Diversity at LSE

What happens when you pay monkeys unequally | Equality and Diversity at LSE | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it

A recent report warned that for the first time the pay gap between men and women is at risk of widening. Currently, on an average, women earn 14.9 per cent less than men. The report closely followed on the heels of the landmark equal pay judgment in favour of 174 ex-employees of Birmingham City Council over the issue of bonuses. Since the topic is hot at the moment, let’s make the most of it - what do monkeys do when paid unequally for equal work?

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Pour une Europe favorable à l'emploi

Pour une Europe favorable à l'emploi | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
Magazine d’information économique et sociale. Tout sur l’actualité économique et sociale en France et dans le monde.
more...
No comment yet.
Suggested by Romek Jagoda
Scoop.it!

Socio-economic barometer 2013 by ABVV-FGTB 'Inequalities, crisis, austerity, model for Europe'

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

CJO - Social Policy Digest

Growing social inequality in EU member states

A report highlighted growing forms of social inequality in all European Union member states. This trend was the result of long-term policy choices for market liberalism, and the prioritization of harsh austerity programmes after the global fiscal crisis. Inequalities were increasing in traditionally more 'egalitarian' societies, and there had been a reversal of historical trends for poorer EU regions to catch up and converge with richer ones. The report criticized the increase in the number of workers (in particular young workers) who were getting trapped in insecure and sub-standard contracts.

Source: Benchmarking Working Europe 2012, European Trade Union Institute/European Trade Union Confederation

Links: Report

Date: 2012-Mar

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract

Cambridge Journals Online - Abstract | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
The Social Policy Digest is of interest to readers of the Journalof Social Policy and it...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Resumen en español del informe Benchmarking Working Europe 2012

Resumen en español del informe Benchmarking Working Europe 2012 | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
pagina ccoo sector financiero y administrativo telemarketing ett nti seguros cajas de ahorro bancos convenios acuerdos...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Od nierówności do kryzysu i z powrotem - Green European Journal

Od nierówności do kryzysu i z powrotem - Green European Journal | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
Nierówności społeczne są zarówno jedną z przyczyn, jak i skutkiem kryzysu. Na wiele sposobów utrudniają osiągnięcie zrównoważonego rozwoju, zagrażając spójności naszych społeczeństw i przyczyniając się do dominacji nieekologicznych modeli konsumpcji.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Dlaczego mundurowym spieszno do emerytury | Czwórkami na emeryturę szli - Polityka.pl

Dlaczego mundurowym spieszno do emerytury | Czwórkami na emeryturę szli - Polityka.pl | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
Służby mundurowe odnotowują wzmożone zainteresowanie pracą. Chętni chcą zdążyć przed końcem roku. Jedynie w wojsku jest inaczej; ostatnio zamiast planowanych 3 tys. przejść na emeryturę, z armii odeszło 7,4 tys.
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

News & Broadcast - Less Poverty Makes People More Equal, Sometimes

News & Broadcast - Less Poverty Makes People More Equal, Sometimes | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it

Less Poverty Makes People More Equal, Sometimes

Economic growth and higher standards of living can spur inequalityDisparities within nations can lead to political upheaval and social unrestEqual opportunity often improves a country's overall welfare

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Why Poverty | A New Global Response to the Greatest Problem of Our Time

Why Poverty | A New Global Response to the Greatest Problem of Our Time | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it

Poverty often comes with or results from inequalities of various type.

This website provides documentaries on poverty.

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by European Works Councils Research
Scoop.it!

Sens posiadania. Po co tyle kupujemy - Polityka.pl

Sens posiadania. Po co tyle kupujemy - Polityka.pl | Benchmarking Working Europe | Scoop.it
Rozmowa z prof.Małgorzatą Górnik-Durose...

 

Z badań wynika, że dobrostan zależy nie tyle od bezwzględnego poziomu dobrobytu, ile od rozwarstwień społecznych – tam, gdzie są one większe, dobrostan jest niższy. Chociaż nie we wszystkich społeczeństwach stwierdza się tę zależność.Nie ma jej tam, gdzie ludzie przywykli do dużych różnic?

Nie w tym rzecz. Są społeczeństwa, które postrzegają rozwarstwienie nie w kategoriach niesprawiedliwości, ale szansy na dołączenie do grupy, która jest uprzywilejowana.

 

W tych społeczeństwach pewnie są spełnione jakieś warunki, np. łatwość awansu, które pozwalają pracowitym i zdolnym liczyć na to, że odniosą materialny sukces?

Niekoniecznie. Ważne są też mity, które leżą u podstaw kultury. Myślę choćby o micie pucybuta, w który wierzą Amerykanie. Może nie wszyscy dostrzegają tę szansę, ale ci, którzy są w głównym nurcie, wierzą, że będą w stanie doskoczyć na wyższy poziom. Nie czują się więc nieszczęśliwi z powodu rozwarstwienia.

more...
No comment yet.