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USDA: Beekeepers Lost 44% of Honey Bee Colonies Last Year

USDA: Beekeepers Lost 44% of Honey Bee Colonies Last Year | beekeeping | Scoop.it
The Bee Informed Partnership released its annual report on honey bee losses in the U.S. Beekeepers reported losing 44% of their total number of colonies
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Very concerning to see so many honey bee colonies under stress. This is an Interesting article for any beekeeper to read to understand the extent of the problem. Such high loses of bee colonies will be detrimental to our food chain supplies, food prices, and off course, the well being of our honey bees. 
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FLOW hive beehive practical review beekeeping 101

http://www.mahakobees.com PRACTICAL review of the FLOW HIVE (tm). This video is very different to most other videos about the Flow hive. We take a practica
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http://www.mahakobees.com PRACTICAL review of the FLOW HIVE (tm).

 

This video is very different to most other videos about the Flow hive. We take a practical approach to this review, and ask questions. Important beekeeping questions, which no doubt every beekeeper that is interested in beekeeping also has on their mind. Will this flow hive perform as advertised? Is this new beehive really going to revolutionize the beekeeping industry? Is it suitable for new beekeepers and families as suggested by the Flow Hive team? Will new beekeepers have success with the flow frames and is this beehive as good as the inventors and Flow Hive manufactures claim? The quality of materials used, the honey harvest speed, the hygienic concerns during the flow hive honey harvest, Is it food grade? Will Small Hive beetles (SHB), wax moth, varroa, mites, and other pests be an issue? Will it withstand propolization and wax build up? And is the very high cost worth the investment?

 

Many legitimate questions that need to be answered. We recommend you take a look at the #Bee Vlog beekeeping video (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0oPKUxsQJUc) which reviews the Flow Hive beehive with the bees well being when overwintering and points out other considerations beekeepers need to keep in mind when considering purchasing and using this beehive in their apiary. It may save your honey bee colonies!

We present no conclusions and are open minded. We hope the beekeeping community can comment below on their experience with the flow frames and that beekeepers from all corners of the world can discuss this product with their apiary location and specific beekeeping goals in mind. We believe this to be an amazing invention that has the potential to be very beneficial once all concerns and issues raised by thousands of experienced beekeepers around the world are addressed. As with any new product, we hope this beehive continues to evolve and improve with each new version.

 

Thank you Flow Hive (tm) for thinking outside the square, and bringing the Flow frames to life. We wish you all the best and hope this product will be beneficial to all bee colonies and beekeepers alike.

 

If you enjoy our videos, we invite you to click the thumbs up (or down if that is how you feel), subscribe, and share our beekeeping videos. Your comments and feedback are most welcome.
Happy beekeeping everyone!
Mahakobees.com

 

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You know about the waggle dance. How much do you know about the tremble dance?

You know about the waggle dance. How much do you know about the tremble dance? | beekeeping | Scoop.it
From the 1992 Seeley article, The tremble dance of the honey bee: message and meanings: “The nectar foragers of a honey bee colony, upon return to the hive, sometimes perform a mysterious behavior called the tremble dance. In performing this dance, a forager shakes her body back and forth, at the same time rotating her body axis by about 50° every second or so, all the while walking slowly across the comb. During the course of a dance, which on average lasts 30 min, the bee travels about the brood nest portion of the hive. It is shown experimentally that a forager will reliably perform this dance if she visits a highly profitable nectar source but upon return to the hive experiences great difficulty finding a food-storer bee to take her nectar. This suggests that the message of the tremble dance is “I have visited a rich nectar source worthy of greater exploitation, but already we have more nectar coming into the hive than we can handle.” It is also shown experimentally that the performance of tremble dances is followed quickly by a rise in a colony's nectar processing capacity and by a drop in a colony's recruitment of additional bees to nectar sources. These findings suggest that the tremble dance has multiple meanings. For bees working inside the hive, its meaning is apparently “I should switch to the task of processing nectar,” while for bees working outside the hive (gathering nectar), its meaning is apparently “I should refrain from recruiting additional foragers to my nectar source.” Hence it appears that the tremble dance functions as a mechanism for keeping a colony's nectar processing rate matched with its nectar intake rate at times of greatly increased nectar influx. Evidently the tremble dance restores this match in part by stimulating a rise in the processing rate, and in part by inhibiting any further rise in the intake rate.”

Via Bruce Shriver
mahakobees's insight:

Have you observed the "Tremble Dance" in your beehive? Never heard of it?Read the below article to learn more about this honey bee behavior. We also have many beekeeping related videos on our YouTube channel we invite you to watch. Clicking this mahakobees link will take you there: https://www.youtube.com/mahakobees.

Happy beekeeping!

http://www.MahakoBees.com

 

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Bruce Shriver's curator insight, May 4, 2016 10:36 AM
Seeley: "it appears that the tremble dance functions as a mechanism for keeping a colony's nectar processing rate matched with its nectar intake rate at times of greatly increased nectar influx."
Eric Larson's curator insight, September 8, 2016 8:13 AM
Waggle dance?
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Do you think the FLOW Hive (tm) will work long term?

Do you think the FLOW Hive (tm) will work long term? | beekeeping | Scoop.it
Do you think the FLOW Hive (tm) will work long term? - Mahako Bees (MAHAKOBEES) - Google+
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Why Nature Prefers Hexagons - Issue 35: Boundaries - Nautilus

Why Nature Prefers Hexagons - Issue 35: Boundaries - Nautilus | beekeeping | Scoop.it
How do bees do it? The honeycombs in which they store their amber nectar are marvels of precision engineering, an array of prism-shaped…

Via Bruce Shriver
mahakobees's insight:

We would like to share this article about hexagons and why the bees prefer it for building their beeswax honeycomb. Honey bees are amazing creatures and their ability to build a very precise beeswax foundation with such accuracy, considering the beehive is completely dark inside, is nothing short of amazing. It takes complex team work with many thousands of bees involved over different stages of their lives and roles they play within it to create the hexagonal beeswax honeycomb. The hexagonal comb structure provides a place to raise their young bees, store honey and pollen. It is critical for the success of a bee colony. Visit our Beekeeping Youtube video channel to learn more: https://www.youtube.com/mahakobees or visit our website if you are interested in becoming a beekeeper http://www.mahakobees.com/store.html.

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Bruce Shriver's curator insight, April 9, 2016 8:59 AM
How do bees do it? The honeycombs in which they store their amber nectar are marvels of precision engineering, an array of prism-shaped cells with a perfectly hexagonal cross-section. The wax walls are made with a very precise thickness, the cells are gently tilted from the horizontal to prevent the viscous honey from running out, and the entire comb is aligned with the Earth’s magnetic field. Yet this structure is made without any blueprint or foresight, by many bees working simultaneously and somehow coordinating their efforts to avoid mismatched cells.
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No junk-food diet: Even in cities, bees find flowers and avoid processed sugars

No junk-food diet: Even in cities, bees find flowers and avoid processed sugars | beekeeping | Scoop.it

New research from North Carolina State University finds that bees in urban areas stick to a flower-nectar diet, steering clear of processed sugars found in soda and other junk food.

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Our honey bees seem know what is good for them and what is not. We should take note of what nature is telling us and understand why this may be the case, and perhaps, we should follow in their footsteps. Learn more about bees, beekeeping and the honey they produceon our Beekeeping Video Youtube channel http://www.youtube.com/mahakobees

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