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ACLU Challenges Gag Order

ACLU Challenges Gag Order | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it
Here’s a rather flagrant instance of abuse of the First Amendment by a court in Rhode Island, where the ACLU is challenging an order by a judge in a custody forbidding a relative of the father in the case from writing about it on the internet.
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Seven things Oprah’s last show can teach us about storytelling

Seven things Oprah’s last show can teach us about storytelling | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it

Everyone who hasn't been living under a rock knows that Oprah ended her 25-year TV show last week. And it was a master example of storytelling, as onlly Oprah can. So what can we learn from her 'piece de resistance'?

 

I think it's great how the author Gail Kent breaks down Oprah's last show to illustrate effective business storytelling.  As Oprah delivered her "thank you" and "love letter" to her fans, she incorporated 7 steps that made it successful storytelling.

 

Learn what these 7 steps are and how to wrap up your storytelling with a 'higher purpose' key message.

 

You too can be as effective as Oprah in your storytelling!


Via Dr. Karen Dietz
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O The Oprah Magazine: Spectacle By Susan Steinberg - Book Finder -

O The Oprah Magazine: Spectacle By Susan Steinberg - Book Finder - | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it

With prose as potent as a shot of Everclear, Susan Steinberg's third collection, Spectacle(Graywolf), surveys busted love, good girls gone bad, and disappeared friends. Unconventional and drily funny, these narcotic stories hypnotize. [via @O_Magazine]

 


Via Media Relations for the University of San Francisco
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University of San Francisco's curator insight, June 24, 2013 7:26 PM

Susan Steinberg a professor of English at the University of San Francisco, and is the author of the story collections Spectacle (Graywolf, 2013), Hydroplane (FC2), and The End of Free Love (FC2). She was the 2010 United States Artists Ziporyn Fellow in Literature. Her stories have appeared in McSweeney's, Conjunctions, The Gettysburg Review, American Short Fiction, Boulevard, Quarterly West, Denver Quarterly, Columbia, The Massachusetts Review, and other journals and magazines, and she has been the recipient of a Pushcart Prize and a National Magazine Award. She has held residencies at The MacDowell Colony, the Vermont Studio Center, the Wurlitzer Foundation, the Blue Mountain Center, Ledig House, Yaddo, and NYU. She earned a BFA in Painting from the Maryland Institute College of Art and an MFA in English from The University of Massachusetts, Amherst.

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Colum McCann: Write What You Want to Know

Colum McCann: Write What You Want to Know | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it

Colum McCann on journeys of inspiration, his intensive research process, and his new novel.

The annoying writerly adage says to write what you know. Great – if you possess a particular passion for accessing the extraordinary in the humdrum. Terrific – if your past is rich with enough adventure or incident to provide a lifetime of inspiration.

But what if it isn’t?

This is the problem that Colum McCann confronted in the summer of 1986, when he came to America, to Cape Cod, with the intention of writing a novel. It’s a problem he has been constructively solving ever since, over the course of two story collections – Fishing the Sloe-Black River (1994) and Everything in This Country Must (1998) – and five novels – Songdogs (1995), This Side of Brightness (1998), Dancer (2003), Zoli (2006), Let the Great World Spin (2009), which won the National Book Award, and the forthcoming TransAtlantic.


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Writing a Novel in 15 Steps: From Initial Idea to Querying

Writing a Novel in 15 Steps: From Initial Idea to Querying | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it

It occurred to me that while I’ve written several posts about the various steps that go into writing a novel from brainstorming to surviving the query trenches, I never really discussed the order, or the step-by-step process of writing a book from initial idea to searching for representation.


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How to Write a Short Story in One Hour

This video will show you how to write a short story in one hour. If you watch it, it will help you with your creative writing and get the juices flowing for ...
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10 Beautifully Illustrated Children’s Books Made For The iPad

10 Beautifully Illustrated Children’s Books Made For The iPad | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it
Editor’s Note: This is a contributed post by Veronica Howes, Marketing Manager at Storypanda. She is passionate about technology, innovation and product design, has a deep love of reading and...
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Expert Writing Strategies - How to Write Better - Oprah.com

Expert Writing Strategies - How to Write Better - Oprah.com | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it
The Director of Columbia University's writing program and author of the new book To Show and to Tell: The Craft of Literary Fiction reveals few ways to write a fresh and engaging story...especially our own.

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Things It Took Me Way Too Long to Learn - Life Lessons - Oprah.com

Things It Took Me Way Too Long to Learn - Life Lessons - Oprah.com | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it
Tales from a 41-year-old. Wisdom, and the woeful path that preceded it, for all ages.

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7 Content Writing Skills from a Creative Writer’s Perspective

7 Content Writing Skills from a Creative Writer’s Perspective | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it

It is important as a content marketer to apply creative writing skills to content writing. Learn the best skills from a creative writer's perspective.Truth be told, I kind of fell into content writing. After being crazy about literature my whole life I went to university to study creative writing, a course I adored and that gave me invaluable experiences in not just fiction and poetry, but scriptwriting and journalism too. Then came graduation, and after that… nothing.Then came content marketing...


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David M. Daniel's curator insight, June 23, 2013 3:32 PM

I'm thinking about this a lot as I move into a robust writing career, but from the starting point of a creative writer.  What other skills did this article miss?  What can we in the "creative sector" offer the corporate content juggernauts?

Angela Tynes's curator insight, August 13, 2013 2:43 PM

Creative writing skills used in content writing...

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Writing is like going to dark place: author Murakami

Writing is like going to dark place: author Murakami | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it

KYOTO, Japan — Bestselling author Haruki Murakami said Monday that writing a novel is like descending to a very dark second basement of your psyche, where you are not even sure where the corridors are.

In a rare public appearance by the publicity-shy but wildly popular writer, Murakami spoke at a seminar entitled "Observe soul, write soul" in the ancient city of Kyoto.

"For novelists or musicians, if they really want to create something, they need to go downstairs and find a passage to get into the second basement," Murakami said, comparing the human mind with a building.

"What I want to do is to go down there, but still stay sane."

About 500 Murakami fans won a ticket for the seminar at Kyoto University, the author's first public appearance in Japan for 18 years.

Press coverage was strictly regulated, with reporters barred from using audio or video equipment to record his speech and no photographs allowed of the author on stage.

Murakami, who wore casual salmon pink trousers and blue training shoes with a light green jacket, said he is fiercely private and hates the idea of being recognised easily on the street.

"Please think of me like an endangered species and just observe me quietly from far away," he said. "If you try to talk to me or touch me casually, I may get intimidated and bite you. So please be careful."


Via Charles Tiayon
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Quick Brown Fox: Great writing workshops coming soon

Quick Brown Fox: Great writing workshops coming soon | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it
Great writing workshops coming soon. “Secrets of Writing a Page-turner”. 10:00 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.. Muskoka Meeting Place at 6 Manitoba Street, Bracebridge Map here. (Note that we've changed venues). Ever stayed up all ...
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How writers in prisons empower inmates

How writers in prisons empower inmates | Becoming a Published Author | Scoop.it
A network of 19 writers is holding writing workshops and reading groups in some of England's toughest jails.

"It's pretty simple," says Clive Hopwood. "There are 87,000 people in prison today. A handful will be coming out on a street near you soon. Would you like them better or worse than when they went in?"

Hopwood (who has had more than 100 titles published and more than 20 plays performed) is co-director of the Writers In Prison Network, set up in the 1990s to unite prison writers-in-residence. The network (which becomes the Writers In Prisons Foundation this month as it achieves full charitable status), oversees 19 writers' residencies in some of England's toughest prisons.

Formerly funded by Arts Council England, the charity (currently surviving on leftover funds) is now seeking more backing, following an independent evaluation of the service from Sheffield Hallam University, published in August. At the moment the prisons pay a minimum of 25% and in year three this rises to 50% match-funding. But there are those prisons which extend a residency's life into year five and beyond that have funded the whole cost of it.

Who are prison writers-in-residence? They are usually jobbing writers, says Hopwood's co-director Pauline Bennett. They will have experience with group work (teaching, creative writing classes) but not necessarily prison experience. This bit, the foundation helps with as each writer undertakes a week-long training course. What is important, says Bennett, is that the writers are "strong and they can cope". She adds: "A prison is not a 'place', it's a series of departments and the writers need to be able to work well with many different departments and the people in them."


Via Charles Tiayon
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