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Rescooped by marissa murphy from Geography Education
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Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent

Africa, Uncolonized: A Detailed Look at an Alternate Continent | places of the world | Scoop.it
What if the Black Plague had killed off almost all Europeans? Then the Reconquista never happens. Spain and Portugal don't kickstart Europe's colonization of other continents. And this is what Africa might have looked like.

 

Tags: Africa, colonialism, borders, historical, map.


Via Seth Dixon
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Bob Beaven's curator insight, March 26, 2015 2:26 PM

An interesting fact for a geographer/historian to look at is how different events happening in history can affect a map.  This is very fascinating, because Africa or should I say Alkebu-Lan has very strong looking kingdoms without the Influence of Europe.  Another interesting element of the map is how it is not Euro-centric, Africa is shown as the top of the world.  I guess in this history, Northern Europe instead of being a powerhouse of the world, would be classified as the dark region (like the Congo was in our own world).  It is also interesting how the map is not Euro-centric, but the fact to keep in mind there is the old saying, history is written by the winner.  In this case, the map of the world was drawn by the winning Europeans as well, and this map completely reverses that.  Another interesting fact, is that the Iberian is part of an Islamic Empire.  It looks, as if in this history, Portugal was overcome by the "Arabes" and Spain never even attempted to launch the Reconquista.  History and Geography, especially Political Geography are very closely linked with one another.  

Chris Costa's curator insight, October 27, 2015 5:00 PM

I found this particularly interesting to read about, as alternative histories fascinate me. The "what if" questions that historians always ask themselves are fun to examine and illustrate, as they are shown in the alternative map of Africa. It's interesting to see just how different this map- drawn from historical accounts of ethnic and linguistic differences between the various African societies- is from the map of Africa we now have today. European colonizers drew borders without any consideration for the native populace, and that is today reflected in the rigid borders of African states that do not match historical ethnic boundaries. The concept of a Europe unable to recover from the Black Death would have serious repercussions for world history. It would allow for the progression of African economies and polities unmolested by European influences and the slave trade, completely reshaping the course of the continent's history. The increased influence of the Arab world would also be a plausible consequence of the decimation of Europe's population. This is an interesting concept, and it is very informative in the sense that it forces us to consider a multitude of factors that played a role in shaping the world as we see and live it today.

Mark Hathaway's curator insight, October 30, 2015 7:04 AM

Alternative history is always fun. There is no question that Africa would be a different place today, if Europeans had never step foot on the shores of this great continent. Would the great African empires still be alive today? Would Africa be the dominant continent in world affairs? The history of civilization over the past 500 years would almost certainly be radically different. Instead of a Eurocentric world, we may have had an Afrocentric world. What this map really underscores, is the effect that colonialism had on Africa. The Africa we know today is a consequence of that era of European domination. While alternate history is fun, we must always remember the actual history that has occurred in Africa.

Rescooped by marissa murphy from Global Affairs & Human Geography Digital Knowledge Source
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Plague outbreak in Madagascar kills 40

Plague outbreak in Madagascar kills 40 | places of the world | Scoop.it
A plague outbreak in Madagascar has killed 40 people and infected dozens more since August, according to the World Health Organization.

Via Allison Anthony
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Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 21, 2015 11:22 PM

Summary: This article is about an outbreak of an infection in Madagascar that has infected many, and killed a few dozen as well. This was caused by people being bitten by a flea that had mutated from the insecticide used to kill it, and concentrated populations in cities. This infection can be treated early on with antibiotics, but only if caught early enough. 

 

Insight: This article relates to access of health care and sanitation because of  their less than average sanitation standards, as well as the lack of infrastructure for things like medication and healthy hospitals. I would compare this situation to that of Sierra Leone and their outbreak of Ebola, but on a much smaller scale. This also wasn't talked about as much on the news, and there is some sort of treatment, even though it's only in the early stage.

Rescooped by marissa murphy from Global Affairs & Human Geography Digital Knowledge Source
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Report: China building 'airstrip capable' island in disputed waters

Report: China building 'airstrip capable' island in disputed waters | places of the world | Scoop.it
China is building an island in the South China Sea that could accommodate an airstrip in bitterly contested waters, says Jane's Defence Weekly.

Via Allison Anthony
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Jake Red Dorman's curator insight, November 25, 2014 11:44 AM

China is building an island in heavily disputed waters in the South China Sea, with many other countries such as Brunei, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan and Vietnam. I kind of take both sides of the story on this dispute and it is hard for me to pick a side to go with on this story. On one hand China is making the land that they are claiming as their own. it as if they found new territory and are the first ones to discover it, but even better, they are making the land. On the other hand though, China is making this new island in, heavily disputed waters with other countries and the areas in dispute include fertile fishing grounds and potentially rich reserves of undersea natural resources. it is hard to go against China on this one but it is also hard not to agree with The other Countries case.   

Raychel Johnson's curator insight, March 21, 2015 7:03 PM

Summary: This article discusses the large dispute of the South China Sea, where there are military advantages as well as undersea resources and food supply. This is a specific example of China claiming sovereignty of the islands of the South China Sea, which resulted in backlashes from both the Philippines and Malaysia.

 

Insight: This article can fall under the category of changes in political-territorial arrangements due to the fact that this is such a large and widespread dispute, getting states from all over the world involved. I personally think something like ASEAN should work, or maybe something through the UN, but I think with a global superpower like China, it's going to be really hard to give smaller states a chance to say anything or do anything because of their lesser involvement. 

Rescooped by marissa murphy from Synthetic biology
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New device could make large biological circuits practical

New device could make large biological circuits practical | places of the world | Scoop.it

Innovation from MIT could allow many biological components to be connected to produce predictable effects.


Via Integrated DNA Technologies
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Rescooped by marissa murphy from Aerospace and aviation construction
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What it took for Elon Musk’s SpaceX to disrupt Boeing, leapfrog NASA, and become a serious space company

What it took for Elon Musk’s SpaceX to disrupt Boeing, leapfrog NASA, and become a serious space company | places of the world | Scoop.it

The Space Exploration Technology rocket factory is a large, white hangar-like building near Los Angeles international airport, with a parking lot filled with late-model motorcycles and Tesla electric cars. The vast metal structure once churned out 737 fuselages for Boeing. When you get through the front doors, past security and a cubicle farm stretching the width of the building, there it is: Science fiction being wrought into shape, right in front of you.


Via Stratocumulus, Nancy Kay Novak
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Vincent Lieser's curator insight, January 2, 2015 6:54 AM

Everything you need to know about SpaceX"s genesis and challenges.

Rescooped by marissa murphy from News in Conservation
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Newly dated Asian cave drawings rewrite history of human art

Newly dated Asian cave drawings rewrite history of human art | places of the world | Scoop.it

Via International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works
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International Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works's curator insight, October 9, 2014 12:10 PM

A new study published in the journal Nature has revealed that ancient paintings of hands and animals found within seven limestone caves on the island of Sulawesi in Indonesia, are as old as famous prehistoric art in Europe

Rescooped by marissa murphy from Astronomy physics and quantum physics
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NASA's Swift mission observes mega flares from nearby red dwarf star

NASA's Swift mission observes mega flares from nearby red dwarf star | places of the world | Scoop.it
On April 23, NASA's Swift satellite detected the strongest, hottest, and longest-lasting sequence of stellar flares ever seen from a nearby red dwarf star. The initial blast from this record-setting series of explosions was as much as 10,000 times more powerful than the largest solar flare ever recorded.

Via Ioannis
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Rescooped by marissa murphy from AP HUMAN GEOGRAPHY DIGITAL STUDY: MIKE BUSARELLO
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An Icy Solution To The Mystery Of The Slithering Stones - NPR

An Icy Solution To The Mystery Of The Slithering Stones - NPR | places of the world | Scoop.it
NPR
An Icy Solution To The Mystery Of The Slithering Stones
NPR
A century ago, miners working in California's Death Valley reported seeing boulders on the desert floor with long trails behind them — as if the stones had been pushed across the sand.

Via Mike Busarello's Digital Storybooks
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Rescooped by marissa murphy from Classroom geography
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Photo - Black Basalt on the Beach, Mauritius

Photo - Black Basalt on the Beach, Mauritius | places of the world | Scoop.it

Because Mauritius is a young volcanic island, black basaltic rocks can be seen at many places along the coast. For example, outcrops and boulders of basalt can be seen in the above picture. I noticed that many items around the town of Grand Gaube were constructed out of basalt, no doubt locally sourced.


Via Mathijs Booden
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Scooped by marissa murphy
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100 most beautiful places in the world (Part 1)

A look at 100 of the most beautiful places in the world. This is part 1, part 2 will be available later. Part 2 here: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nEXFMAJ7...
marissa murphy's insight:

wowwwww....

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Rescooped by marissa murphy from Geography
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23 maps and charts on language

23 maps and charts on language | places of the world | Scoop.it

"Did you know that Swedish has more in common with Hindi than it does with Finnish? Explaining everything within the limits of the world is probably too ambitious a goal for a list like this. But here are 23 maps and charts that can hopefully illuminate small aspects of how we manage to communicate with one another."

 

Tags: language, culture, English, infographic.


Via Seth Dixon, CT Blake
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Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:40 PM

Mapping of languages...

Isabella El-Hage's curator insight, March 19, 2015 11:15 AM

This article links with Unit Three through "language and communication". These 23 maps range from the history of languages, which languages connect with which, common languages in certain places, different phrases used in the same country for the same thing, and more. Looking at maps to spatially see language helps when trying to understand how the world communicates. One of the maps that I found interesting was the "New York tweets by language". It shows how diverse that city is, and how people are still preserving their native language in a English prominent country.  

Avery Liardon's curator insight, March 23, 2015 9:00 PM

Unit 2:

Shows how many languages are actually closely related. Whether or not they sound the same or are located in similar regions, many share the same origins. For example: many words in Spanish and English are the same due to their similar roots. 

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Climate Change Threatens to Strip the Identity of Glacier National Park

Climate Change Threatens to Strip the Identity of Glacier National Park | places of the world | Scoop.it
In a century, the number of glaciers in Montana’s Glacier National Park, on the Canadian border, has dropped to about 25 from 150.
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Rescooped by marissa murphy from Lorraine's Interconnections
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The Geography of Terrorism

The Geography of Terrorism | places of the world | Scoop.it
More than 80 percent of last year's terrorism fatalities occurred in just five countries.

Via oyndrila, Lorraine Chaffer
marissa murphy's insight:

this is interesting!!!

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oyndrila's curator insight, November 23, 2014 12:11 PM

Worth a discussion under the impacts of Globalisation. 

Rich Schultz's curator insight, November 26, 2014 1:37 PM

More than 80 percent of last year's terrorism fatalities occurred in just five countries.

Rescooped by marissa murphy from Geography Education
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The changing shape of world demographics

Animating the changing shape of the world population pyramid. For more multimedia content from The Economist visit our website: http://econ.st/1xqEZhX.


Via Seth Dixon
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Deanna Metz's curator insight, March 1, 2016 8:05 PM

This is an incredibly powerful and remarkably well-done video by the Economist (see related article here) that is reminiscent of a TED-ED lesson on the importance and value of population pyramids.  This video goes nicely with this article from the World Bank entitled "The End of the Population Pyramid" which highlights the demographic changes that will be reshaping global demographics in the next 50-100 years.  


Tag: population, declining population, demographic transition model, video, APHG.

Damon Recagno's curator insight, October 12, 2017 11:52 AM

Here is a quick introduction to the shifting population demographics and why there is a Declining Natural Growth Rate.

 

This video is a good way of introducing the topic of Cities and Countries Methods for Tackling a Declining Natural Growth Rate because it provides insight on why many locations around the world are currently experiencing a declining natural growth rate.

Teresa Morante Arona's comment, October 13, 2017 9:35 PM
Gret Video, but why do you think there is such a diverse shift in population demographics?
Rescooped by marissa murphy from Global Potato News
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Washington, Oregon potato farmers eye Southeast Asia

Oregon and Washington agriculture officials will spend 10 days in the Philippines and Vietnam promoting Northwest potatoes. Fresh U.S. potatoes can’t compete on price with homegrown or Chinese spuds, so the bistate delegation will stress quality, the Washington Department of Agriculture’s international marketing program manager, Joe Bippert, said. “If we can get across the idea that the Northwest potato is a premium potato, we can demand a premium price,” he said.


Via Lukie Pieterse
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Rescooped by marissa murphy from IB Geography @NIST
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These pictures will make you see global warming like never before

These pictures will make you see global warming like never before | places of the world | Scoop.it
You've probably heard that climate change has made our planet slightly warmer. Here's how that's affecting us.

Via Andy Dorn
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Rescooped by marissa murphy from Solags
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Solving the mystery of the 'man in the moon': Volcanic plume, not an asteroid, likely created the moon's largest basin

Solving the mystery of the 'man in the moon': Volcanic plume, not an asteroid, likely created the moon's largest basin | places of the world | Scoop.it
New data obtained by NASA's GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon—a giant basin often referred to as the "man in the moon"—likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma...

Via Jeff Powell
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Rescooped by marissa murphy from Classroom geography
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Video - Tavurvur erupts in Papua New Guinea


Via Mathijs Booden
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20 Creepiest Places in the World

From mental asylums to haunted castles and even islands we count down the 20 creepiest places in the world! Click Here To Subscribe! http://bit.ly/xWackyWedn...
marissa murphy's insight:

Found this interesting and creepy

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