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What Men Live By - Activity

What Men Live By - Activity | Be Creative | Scoop.it

Group 1 REPORT:

 

For this activity, we split the classroom into 5 groups, each with five members. Combining our technical illustrations to elaborate the story by Leo Tolstoy "What Men Live By".

 

We, group 1, have had to make the Time Slider book, as well as acknowledgments, illustrations for the story´s introduction and first chapter; We have also added an activity crossword puzzle in relation to the story and a glossary.

 

Our group is divided as follows:

 

1. Wendy Mavares - Illustrations

http://www.scoop.it/t/be-creative-by-be-creative

 

2. Carlos Castillo-Illustrations

http://www.scoop.it/t/feelingsound-sound-is-alive

 

3. Dewars Bracho - Exercise

http://www.scoop.it/t/book-covers-by-dewars-bracho

 

4. Michelle Delgado - Exercise

http://www.scoop.it/t/vectorizingt

 

5. Nathanael Becerra - Cover

http://www.scoop.it/t/web-animations

 

Tools:

 

We used the following software :

 

1- Adobe Photoshop.

2- Adobe Illustrator.

3- Adobe Indesign.

4- Easy Paint Tool Sai. (In this program we have used a drawing tablet).

 

In this part we see Simon gets up one morning to make a living selling shoes he does with his own hands, he and his family are poor, and he earns barely enough money for food. That morning, he was trying to make a sale to finally buy some sheepskin for warmth, but when he knocked on the door the customer wasn't at home. After a bad day, on the way home, Simon suddenly meets a young man lying on the floor and this is where the story begins.

 

It has been a very fun activity, combining our techniques has resulted in a rather interesting book.

 

Link: 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BxK4BeIYFn0rfktXS3lZWWJ5Uk83b2UtenJsc2hValdraHN3bGVXdFNIQU1oSnM2MnNTVFk

  


Via Carlos Castillo
Wendy Mavares's insight:
Wendy Mavares's insight: 

This story written by Leo Tolstoy "What men live by" talks about how hard is the life of a shoemaker (Simon) who do a lot of things for give a good life for his family, then he includes a new member in the family, and everything change.

 

For me, this story is powerful and talks about impotant things like family, compassion, the importance of the money, and other things useful in the life, leaving a strong menssage about how to live.

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Michelle Delgado's curator insight, August 3, 2015 4:03 PM

What Men Live By is a short story written by Leo Tolstoy about a poor man and his family, it has a deep message about how to live.

 We worked on the book's design and some of the illustrations. :)

Dr. Doris Molero's curator insight, August 5, 2015 9:33 PM

Wendy Mavares's insight: 

This story written by Leo Tolstoy "What men live by" talks about how hard is the life of a shoemaker (Simon) who do a lot of things for give a good life for his family, then he includes a new member in the family, and everything change.

 

For me, this story is powerful and talks about impotant things like family, compassion, the importance of the money, and other things useful in the life, leaving a strong menssage about how to live.

Leoncio Lopez-Ocon's curator insight, August 6, 2015 3:16 AM

Carlos Castillo's insight:

This is a job for my English class in which dividing us illustrate group in part of the letter written by Leo Tolstoy "What men live by" history.

 

It's been quite fun to do this activity on this story. We used two different methods of illustration making a contrast between the characters and the setting, but trabajn in harmony.

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Muddy Colors: Illustration Process: Traditional Work

Muddy Colors: Illustration Process: Traditional Work | Be Creative | Scoop.it
The watercolor process begins with washes of earth colors to tone the paper, applied wet into wet. Then after this has dried color and value are slowly worked up with about ten thousand tiny washes applied wet into wet or wet into damp. One of the nice things about this approach is that it allows folks like me, who have a foggy command of color at best, to experiment a lot as they work. If a color doesn't look right it is really easy to adjust. After this I panic and then throw all the old illustrator tricks at the piece in a last desperate effort to save it.These tricks include, but are not necessarily limited to: Ink, pencil, acrylic, markers, badgers, lawsuits, incantations, harsh language, oaths, gouache, threats and even blows.
Wendy Mavares's insight:

The Illustration isn't digital format only, can also be found on a piece of paper or canvas, a pencil and why not? watercolors, there are many techniques to use and create images. In this article the author explains how to create an illustration with a blend of traditional techniques.

 

In my opinion the techniques to illustrate has no limits, there is not only the art that this article provides, there are many more that are helpful for an illustrator. If you decide to choose traditional illustration like your style of drawing, this article will help you to improve.

 

Workshop

 

Main Ideas | Definition Makers | Time secuence and order Markers 

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCQkVUY2RDLXFOTWM/view?usp=sharing

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

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Making the move from illustration to animation | Animation | Creative Bloq

Making the move from illustration to animation | Animation | Creative Bloq | Be Creative | Scoop.it


The move from illustration to animation is a logical one. Improvements in software - integration, usability, cost - mean the transition is easier than ever before. And it pays to be adaptable. The ability to offer both services makes you a doubly attractive proposition to potential clients, and gives you greater creative control over your work.

 

The shift from static to moving image, however, isn't necessarily as simple as it appears. While the respective disciplines share many of the same skills and tools - the same DNA if you will - they remain distinct. An accomplished illustrator isn't certain to make a comparably skilled animator. Stills, however good, are difficult to augment in such a way as to become captivating moving images.

Wendy Mavares's insight:

A big step that should give an illustrator for improve is to add motion to their images and create animations. Forget the idea of only do static pictures and give a bit of live to their images. If you do it you progress like illustrator and gives to you a lot of opportunities of have a job because you will have now two skills with that.

 

In this article combines a bit the idea of be an illustrator and a animator, because those two have a relation in common and is create images, an animator could be an illustrator but not always an illustrator knows how to animate their works, so this text will give the shove that an illustrator needs to give that big step in their life, its hard, but necessary.

 

WorkShop

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCY2tPT0l4VnlsNWM/view?usp=sharing

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

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Thoughts on becoming a pro Illustrator - Part II

Thoughts on becoming a pro Illustrator - Part II | Be Creative | Scoop.it

Before you plan to stand on your own feet you need a computer that can process your work files and on which you can rely on. 
(So to say not an old rig that keeps you waiting for 5 minutes to open a PSD file and crashes every 10 minutes.)
Then you need of course your preferred programs, (bought, not cracked.) a tablet  or mouse, a good screen, or other equipment you need. Not to forget a comfy chair that substitutes your back if you sit 10 hours or more on your ass. Sure, you all know that you need such stuff before you begin to take serious commissions. 

Far more important is the fact that you get very quick help in a case of a computer or hardware failure. (like a borrowed computer, another wacom, screen... and that asap) plus that you have a backup from all your files -  preferable several backups on different media. The best is to have a complete second workstation in case yours fail.  
I know, this might sound utopic and impossible, but I think it´s a serious consideration to be redundant like this. Keeping your old comp as backup if you intend to buy a new one makes your younger siblings not happy, but it gives you a warm fuzzy and save feeling in your guts and also in your purse.
Why? Because you have still deadlines to keep and work to do.

Clients don´t care if you have data loss, they have paid you and expect you to deliver like you have stated in the contract. 
If you can´t deliver your work to the spot, you´ll lose the job.

Wendy Mavares's insight:

 

For be a professional illustrator you need more that a talent, you need to sell yourself to the world and the people be interested in you and your works, you need to have a portfolio, manage your clients and the deadline of your works, and finally is necessary to have a redundancy of your equipment if your plan is living of sell your digital art.

 

You need to change your space of work, while you're having more experience through to the years, (change the mouse for a graphic tablet like an example) is necessary that what is around of you change for help you to evolve. You need to feed yourself with new information, be wise and prepared for whatever that comes.

 

This article will help you all future illustrators to be prepared for the future, and will give help to be noticed, because if you don´t yell to the world outside that you are there, nobody will notice you. And maybe you will never get a job.

 

---

 

Workshop:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCaHBDTEVuRmpJX3M/view?usp=sharing

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

 

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What Men Live By - Leo Tolstoi.swf

What Men Live By a short story by Leo Tolstoy

 

 A shoemaker named Simon, who had neither house nor land of his own, lived with his wife and children in a peasant’s hut, and earned his living by his work. Work was cheap, but bread was dear, and what he earned he spent for food. The man and his wife had but one sheepskin coat between them for winter wear, and even that was torn to tatters, and this was the second year he had been wanting to buy sheep-skins for a new coat. Before winter Simon saved up a little money: a three-rouble note lay hidden in his wife’s box, and five roubles and twenty kopeks were owed him by customers in the village.

 

 

 

Wendy Mavares's insight:

This is the book about a shoemaker with a hard life, he had neither house nor land of his own, lived with his wife and children in a peasant’s hut, and earned his living by his work. 

 

Our work was make a illustration about the introduction and the first chapter, and create a cover for this story.

 

This story is full of sad and difficult moments that our protagonist must overcome for give a happy life to his family and a poor guy that he will give help.

 

Members

Wendy Mavares

Dewars Bracho

Carlos Castillo

Natanael Becerra

Michelle Delgado

 

Links, 1 and 2:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCX01rR1o5c19iNVU/view?usp=sharing

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCcHk1ajlPOTBxWU0/view?usp=sharing

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

 

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Natanael Bec-And's curator insight, June 5, 2015 11:26 AM

It is the story of a shoemaker and his family in poverty trying to survive with what little they have

 

Miembros:

 

Wendy Mavares

Dewars Bracho

Carlos Castillo

Natanael Becerra

Michelle Delgado

 

Enlaces, 1 y 2:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCX01rR1o5c19iNVU/view?usp=sharing

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCcHk1ajlPOTBxWU0/view?usp=sharing

 

# Doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

Dewars Bracho's curator insight, June 5, 2015 1:59 PM
This is the beginning of history, I invite you to see the pictures of this impressive reading.
Michelle Delgado's curator insight, June 15, 2015 9:20 AM

It is the story of a shoemaker and his family in poverty trying to survive with what little they have

 

Miembros:

 

Wendy Mavares

Dewars Bracho

Carlos Castillo

Natanael Becerra

Michelle Delgado

 

Enlaces, 1 y 2:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCX01rR1o5c19iNVU/view?usp=sharing

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCcHk1ajlPOTBxWU0/view?usp=sharing

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What is Vector Art?

What is Vector Art? | Be Creative | Scoop.it
What Is Vector Art? Vector Art is a technique, not a style. Perhaps a better term would be "vector-based art," meaning art created in a vector-based program. Vector art consists of creating p...
Wendy Mavares's insight:

What is Vector Art?

 

Vector Art is a technique, not a style. 

Perhaps a better term would be "vector-based art," meaning art created in a vector-based program. Vector art consists of creating paths and points in a program such as Illustrator or Freehand. The program keeps track of the relationships between these points and paths.  Vectors are any scaleable objects that keeps their proportions and quality when sized up or down. They're defined as solid objects, and can be moved around in full, or grouped together with other objects. Vectors can be defined by mathematical and numeric data.  So vector art is anything that's created in Illustrator, Freehand, Corel Draw, Flash or other "vector" illustration programs.

---

 

The Vector or Graphical Modeling is a type of computer graphics. Vector graphics uses geometrical objects, like points, lines, curves, and polygons to model the image. Vector is an easy way to illustrate when you don’t have a Graphic Tablet (Like a Bamboo or a Genius). The article explain about what it’s exactly this, and what kind of programs you could use for do a Vector Art; usually the illustrators prefers to use this technique because it can make a impeccable graphic work.

 

In my opinion, the Vector art should be used for complicated works, like animation, thanks to the simple way it works and neatness, for heavy works is easy to use, and if you're really stressed for draw something it is other option to take.

 

An Illustrator use the creativity for make a illustration, so dont forget to be creative always! ;) 

 

Workshop number 1 and 2:

 https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCQlpMV3M5X1RvMTA/view?usp=sharing

 

https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B3xjXFSMGcDCdlM1OFNXRVNNRk0&authuser=0

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

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The Process Behind Good Illustration (Part 1) - Smashing Magazine

I'd like to share tenets behind what I think good illustration is, what I learned about the process and technique behind how to execute it.
Wendy Mavares's insight:

“Art” is something philosophers have spent centuries trying to define, sadly with no satisfactory result (a debate that is far beyond the scope of this article). But illustration, while it covers a broad range of image-making, does have very distinct meanings, and it is very different from justartwork. #doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

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Adriana Bolívar's comment, May 4, 2015 3:46 PM
same feeling
David Fuemayor's comment, May 4, 2015 3:51 PM
Very interesting we can use this article to learn more about to make betters ilustrations
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What Men Live By - Leo Tolstoy.pdf

What Men Live By - Leo Tolstoy.pdf | Be Creative | Scoop.it

Via Carlos Castillo
Wendy Mavares's insight:

This story written by Leo Tolstoy "What men live by" talks about how hard is the life of a shoemaker (Simon) who do a lot of things for give a good life for his family, then he includes a new member in the family, and everything change.

 

For me, this story is powerful and talks about impotant things like family, compassion, the importance of the money, and other things useful in the life, leaving a strong menssage about how to live.

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

more...
Carlos Castillo's curator insight, July 27, 2015 12:41 PM

This is a job for my English class in which dividing us illustrate group in part of the letter written by Leo Tolstoy "What men live by" history.

 

It's been quite fun to do this activity on this story. We used two different methods of illustration making a contrast between the characters and the setting, but trabajn in harmony.

 

Link: https://drive.google.com/open?id=0BxK4BeIYFn0rfktXS3lZWWJ5Uk83b2UtenJsc2hValdraHN3bGVXdFNIQU1oSnM2MnNTVFk


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Combining Traditional and Digital Illustration Techniques

Combining Traditional and Digital Illustration Techniques | Be Creative | Scoop.it

My task was to create illustrations for nine chapters of a special issue of Casus Belli magazine devoted to a mythical city called Laelith. Each illustration was supposed to show the atmosphere of the neighborhood being described. The image presented here is of The High Terrace, a rich and colorful environment where Laelith’s leading citizens are found. The rocky spires are magicians’ towers—the highest points of the city—where occult experiments take place. The idea was to present the neighborhood as if seen by a wandering tourist, but at the same time suggest the ethereal but omnipresent power of magic in the city. This is why I chose the point of view of a person in a crowd, but with a very wide-angle view. 

Wendy Mavares's insight:

Having two styles as an illustrator is always an advantage when you want to make advertising of your work, you must know how to combine them so that other people be interested in you and your skill, and in this article two of those skills are the digital and traditional styles of drawing, you can use them both for make an original style like for make an own way for work, the imagination is your limit, and with these tips you will know how do that.

-----

Workshop link:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCYWJRZmRlMWxTR0E/view?usp=sharing

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

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How to start your illustration career - Nate Williams

How to start your illustration career - Nate Williams | Be Creative | Scoop.it

How to start your illustration career

The career path of an illustrator isn’t very clear and that is probably why people often ask me how I got started as an illustrator and if there is any advice I can give them in regards to becoming a professional illustrator.

 

I think having a successful illustration career comes down to the following: Unique Consistent Style, Technical Skills, Marketing, Tracking Work and Attitude. Hopefully, you will find something useful in this article.

Wendy Mavares's insight:

This article is a helpful guide about how start like a illustrator, giving a lot of tips that can be useful for you, and let an advice about what kind of attitude you should have for make your first step in the world of the illustration, and give some examples of what you could do if you feel a bit lost.

 

I’m my opinion for start like an illustrator you also need to practice an own style, learn new things that help to improve you skill , sell yourself to the world like you’re saying “hey, I’m here, and I can be the best”. Also you need to practice over and over for be better.

 

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Workshop Link: 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCRlhfVVVfNy1uTE0/view?usp=sharing

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

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10 Drawing Myths That Block Your Progress - Tuts+ Design & Illustration Article

10 Drawing Myths That Block Your Progress - Tuts+ Design & Illustration Article | Be Creative | Scoop.it

Drawing seems like a fun skill. It makes it possible to bring your ideas out, to show them to others in shape and color. And all this with a few simple tools! No wonder that so many people dream of learning how to draw. Unfortunately, this kind of skill sometimes seems impossible to attain. Why is it harder than, let's say, playing chess or cooking?

 

In this article I'd like to show you that even though drawing is hard, sometimes you make it harder with your own mind. These mental obstacles stop you from learning and bring needless frustration. If you understand them, they'll disappear and you'll finally be free to learn!

Wendy Mavares's insight:

This article talks about the myths that exist in the world of the art and illustration, and is a help and support for the people that start like a illustrator, to help them to love their own art, and be patient because they need to keep practicing for be better.

 

Those myths usually block the people that want to start to draw, nobody tells you how to draw, you don't have to complain about you "can't draw very well", if you want to do it, and you work for it, you're going to improve your skill. 

 

So don't forget to practice and trust in yourself :)

 

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Workshop Link:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCUG0yLVdmZkhBWkE/view?usp=sharing

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

 

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Interview with Maria Isabel.docx

Interview with Maria Isabel.docx | Be Creative | Scoop.it

Maria Isabel Medina is a graphic designer. She studied at LUZ and right now she is working at Banesco like the web designer, and she is involved in the technical and graphical conceptualizing the project, regardless of medium (PC, mobile, tablets). She also has knowledge of photography, and knows how to manage and develop her skills; however this is a hobby for her.

Wendy Mavares's insight:

 

On the interview, she describes that be a graphic designer is art and also a science subject to certain requirements, are constant challenges for the development of high impact solutions given times and product characteristics. She chose this career because In all her life she 've been drawing to the arts in general;  she covered  personal needs with plastic arts, instead with the design, it needed for a customer; it went beyond the purpose of producing feelings to someone, it captured the attention of an audience to purchased a product or attended an event.

 

According to her says, for be a graphic designer it's required more than talent or artistic ability. Communication is the ability to understand what the customer wants to carry it out and meet the expectations. She says that being a designer is to manage a software design; It is to know history, theory and country traditions. It is the ability to explain the how and why of each project is performed. Being a graphic designer is to have knowledge of any thing that the people needs and want. In the interview she accepts the job of the Graphic designers is undervalued, but that idea has been transforming over the years. To understand the role in the design, you must know what is happening around. The communication and the marketing have been playing an important role through the concept of globalization, science and technology, are becoming very important in the common life of people paper, through social networks and virtual communities, 3D teleconferencing, the Video games are the future innovations that will transform the ways of seeing and doing design. 

 

Her aspirations in the career were created and developed a profile in terms of knowledge and skills that could be used under different schemes of work. The easiest part in the career is be surrounded by like-minded individuals and exchanged thoughts and experiences, stimulated more creativity; on the other hand she thinks that the more difficult part of the career were that in the world of the design, the critic is very ruthless and rude, and for overcome that difficulty a person should be strong enough to take criticism professionally. One gradually gets the trust of people and you learn to control the creative part.

She explained that in Venezuela exist a future for graphic designers she said: "there are several successful groups of young people that are creating their own studies and its own language that have expanded and investigated new design fields", and if she have to advise someone to be a graphic designer she answer: "It is not about advise someone, if you want to be a designer you need to be a person with concerns and motivation to be updated and renewed and providing different ideas. Dynamism, freshness and spirit of excellence should be the first step. "

 

And to end the interview she answers the last question about what she would do if her children wanted to be designers as well? saying: If these are their desires I will accept them; I strongly support my children in their decision.


The Interview links, 1 and 2:

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCT3RreTRKM2ctWkU/view?usp=sharing

 

https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B3xjXFSMGcDCaVNQVnZNR3h3Qmc/view?usp=sharing

 

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Rumay-Chian on DeviantArt

Rumay-Chian on DeviantArt | Be Creative | Scoop.it
 
Wendy Mavares's insight:

Hi, My name is Wendy Mavares, I’m 19 years old and I’m a Graphic Design student of URBE, in Maracaibo, Venezuela.
People also know me like “Rumay-Chian” on deviantart, I’m a illustrator inspired on manga, comic and videogames, I work on comics, draw, animation and design of character for stories, and this is the link of all my works: http://rumay-chian.deviantart.com/
In that page I can practice my English, and my dream is make my own comic or story for share with the other people, or just can share my ideas in a illustration, I hope I can live someday in Spain or USA because I like those countries.
I study Graphic Design because I love almost everything of my career, photography, Photoshop, animation, illustration, and others. I usually work alone because is comfortable to me, but also I can work with other persons without problem. In my free time I like to practice my skills because I’m sure I can be better of what I am today. 

 

#doris3meflcenter #graphicdesignurbe

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