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New York mayor: 'centuries of racism' in US

New York mayor: 'centuries of racism' in US | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio believes the United States is confronting "centuries of racism," after a week of protests that shook major cities across the country. "We have to have an honest conversation in this country about a history of racism, we have to have an honest conversation about the problems that have caused parents to feel that their children may be in danger in their dynamics with police, when in fact police are there to protect them," he told ABC News. 


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Racism is a major topic going on in the United States right now 

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Deforestation dropped 18% in Brazil's Amazon over past 12 months

Deforestation dropped 18% in Brazil's Amazon over past 12 months | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
Deforestation in the Amazon rain forest dropped 18% over the past 12 months, falling to the second-lowest level in a quarter century, Brazil’s environment minister said on Wednesday.

Izabella Teixeira told participants at a news conference that 4,848 square kilometers (1,870 square miles) of rain forest were destroyed between August 2013 and July 2014. That’s a bit larger than the US state of Rhode Island.

The figures were down from 5,891 square kilometers (2,275 square miles) razed during the same period a year earlier, in the wake of the adoption of a controversial bill revising the Forest Code. The measure, which passed in 2012 after more than a decade-long effort by Brazil’s powerful agricultural lobby, mostly eased restrictions for landowners with smaller properties, allowing them to clear land closer to riverbanks.
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Deforestation is down in Brazil this year

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Australia's floods had global effects | Climate Network News

Australia's floods had global effects | Climate Network News | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

Rain – in effect, evaporated ocean – fell in such colossal quantities during the Australian floods in 2010 and 2011 that the world’s sea levels actually dropped by as much as 7mm.

 

Rainwater normally runs swiftly off continental mountain ranges, pours down rivers, collects in aquifers and lakes and then winds across floodplains into the sea. But Australia, as any Australian will proudly claim, is different.

 

Rain that falls in the outback of the largest island – also the smallest continent – tends to dribble away into inland waterways and seemingly get lost, without ever making it to the coast, or to collect in shallow inland seas and stay there till it evaporates.

 

“It is a beautiful illustration of how complicated our climate system is”, says John Fasullo, of the US National Centre for Atmospheric Research. “The smallest continent in the world can affect sea level worldwide. Its influence is so strong that it can temporarily overcome the background trend of rising sea levels that we see with climate change.”

 

Fasullo and colleagues outline the drama of the vanishing sea levels in Geophysical Research Letters. Although there are daily, seasonal and annual variations, sea levels worldwide have been creeping up by 3mm a year on average, as a consequence of ocean warming and glacial melting.

 

But in 2010, sea levels mysteriously began to drop by 7mm, and stayed lower than expected for 18 months. This really was unexpected: global average temperatures had not dropped, greenhouse emissions had continued to increase, glaciers had continued to melt.

 

Click headline to read more--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
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The floods effect the world climate

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Emma Murphy's curator insight, September 3, 2013 11:18 PM

It's remarkable that rainfall in such a small continent can effect the sea level all over the world. Typically every year on average, the sea level goes up by 3mm. Because of the rainfall in Australia in 2010 and 2011, the sea level went down by 7 mm this year. 

EJ JANSEN's comment, September 8, 2013 6:43 PM
Really interesting Emma
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Egypt militant group posts video of attack on army checkpoint

Egypt militant group posts video of attack on army checkpoint | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
CAIRO (Reuters) - Egypt's most dangerous militant group on Friday posted its first video message since pledging allegiance to Islamic State, with footage purporting to show that the group was behind one

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A video of an attack is posted to show the violence of a militant group

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A history of Serengeti National Park

A history of Serengeti National Park | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
Tanzania's Serengeti national park is among the biggest wild animal reserves in Africa, as an extremely complex ecosystem. It's also the starting point of th...

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A video about the Serengeti National Park and its meaning to the area/world.

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gregory lane's curator insight, March 10, 2014 5:40 AM
serengeti is among the biggest animal reserves
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Bomber Kills At Least 50 Along Wagah Border in Pakistan

Bomber Kills At Least 50 Along Wagah Border in Pakistan | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
At least 55 people were killed and at least 120 more were wounded Sunday evening when a suicide bomber set off explosives at a border post in eastern Pakistan, police officials said.

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Suicide bomber kills atleast 50 in Pakistan 

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South East Asia fishery improvement project announced for fisheries that supply fishmeal to aquaculture

South East Asia fishery improvement project announced for fisheries that supply fishmeal to aquaculture | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

Sustainable Fisheries Partnership (SFP) has announced the launch of a South East Asia Fishery Improvement Project (FIP) aimed at improving the fisheries that supply fishmeal to aquaculture feeds in Asia. The announcement was made at a meeting of the Asia Sustainable Fishmeal Roundtable in Bangkok.


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Improvments coming in the fisheries 

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Drying of the Aral Sea: Timelapse | YouTube.com

Explore a global timelapse of our planet, constructed from Landsat satellite imagery. With water diverted to irrigation, the inland Aral Sea has shrunk dramatically. Many areas were completely dry by 2009.

 

Each frame of this timelapse map is constructed from a year of Landsat satellite data, constituting an annual 1.7-terapixel snapshot of the earth at 30-meter resolution.

 

The Landsat program, managed by the USGS, has been acquiring images of the Earth's surface since 1972. Landsat provides critical scientific information about our changing planet.

 

Click headline to watch the video presentation full screen--


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The drying of the Aral Sea over a period of time.

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Energy in Central Asia: Balance, Not a Great Game - The National Interest Online

Energy in Central Asia: Balance, Not a Great Game - The National Interest Online | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
The National Interest Online Energy in Central Asia: Balance, Not a Great Game The National Interest Online A commonly-held view in the West is that a new “Great Game” is underway in Central Asia as the major powers compete for the region's...

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Energy  balance battle in central Asia

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Russia Is Running Out of Forest

Russia Is Running Out of Forest | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

It seems unfeasible that Russia, which holds a fifth of the planet's forests, could run out of wood. And yet it is happening, at least with commercially usable forests, environmental analysts say.

The Russian logging industry will face lack of harvestable timber in 10 to 20 years, a short time by the standards of an industry naturally tied to slow tree growth cycles, according to their consensus.
"We are already past the point of no return," Konstantin Kobyakov, who oversees the protection of high conservation value forest at WWF Russia, told The Moscow Times.

To keep the logging industry on the rails, Russia needs to go from extensive to intensive forest management — i.e. from clearing forests once and moving to new territories to replanting them, industry players and officials agree.


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Russia has a forest management problem?

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NATO general warns of further Russian aggression

BELBEK, Crimea — NATO’s top military commander warned Sunday that Russia could seek to expand its territorial conquest to new areas, just a day after Russian forces seized some of the final Ukrainian military installations in the contested Crimean Peninsula.

U.S. Air Force Gen. Philip M. Breedlove, the commander of U.S. and NATO forces in Europe, said Russia had assembled a large force on Ukraine’s eastern border that could pose a threat to Moldova’s separatist Transnistria region.

“The [Russian] force that is at the Ukrainian border now to the east is very, very sizeable and very, very ready,” Breedlove said at an event sponsored by the German Marshall Fund.

Ukraine’s east is also considered under threat; Ukrainian officials have been warning for weeks that Russia is trying to provoke a conflict there, a charge Russia denies.

But Breedlove said Russian ambitions extend beyond Ukraine.

“There is absolutely sufficient force postured on the eastern border of Ukraine to run to Transdniestria if the decision was made to do that, and that is very worrisome," Breedlove said.

Transdniestria, a narrow strip of land wedged between the rest of Moldova and southern Ukraine, proclaimed its independence in 1990. Although the move was not recognized internationally, the region has its own constitution and currency, and pro-Russian sentiment there runs high. Russian forces are also stationed in the territory — as they were in Crimea even before the current crisis began.

Russian Deputy Defense Minister Anatoly Antonov said Russia is complying with all international agreements on troop limits near its border with Ukraine, according to Russian news services.

Antonov said Russian Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu had discussed the situation with foreign counterparts, including U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel, “in recent months.”

“Shoigu firmly informed all of them about the real situation on the border, and the absence of any intention to concentrate forces there,” Antonov said, according to the Interfax news service.

Breedlove’s comments come a day after Russian forces in armored personnel carriers broke through the walls of an air base near Belbek, one of the last Ukrainian military outposts in Crimea, quickly overpowering Ukrainian troops armed only with sticks. After the Russians took over the base, its Ukrainian commander was detained, according to news reports.

The fall of the air base, along with the loss of a second Ukrainian air base Saturday near the Crimean town of Novofedorivka and the storming of a Ukrainian ship, removed some of the last barriers to total Russian control of Crimea.

The takeovers came less than a week after Crimeans voted overwhelmingly in a referendum to leave Ukraine and join Russia. In their speed, the base seizures — which had progressed all week — were emblematic of Crimea’s swift absorption into the Russian Federation, even as Ukraine’s leaders reiterated Saturday that they do not recognize the annexation.

Russia's Defense Ministry said Sunday that its forces were in control of 189 military units and institutions in Crimea, according to the news agency RIA. Only one significant base is believed to remain in Ukrainian hands — the Feodosia naval marine base. The Ukrainian marines are an elite force that is considered fiercely loyal to Ukraine. But the base has been surrounded by Russian forces for two weeks.

Fall of Belbek air base

The Ukrainians put up no resistance on the orders of the Belbek base commander, Col. Yuli Mamchur, who has become a symbol of Ukrainian spirit for his steely defiance of repeated Russian demands that the tactical air wing surrender and relinquish all weapons.

Most of the 200 or so troops on the base have weapons, but Mamchur was determined to avoid casualties. So when four Russian personnel carriers drove through a concrete wall and rammed down the wrought-iron front gate after anhours-long standoff, Mamchur’s men were waiting with sticks that appeared to have been fashioned from broken broom handles, tree branches, railing dowels, table legs and croquet mallets.

Two ambulances sped from the scene within minutes of the Russian incursion. Mamchur said one of his men had been kicked and beaten by the advancing Russians. It was unclear whether there were other casualties.

Russian infantrymen armed with automatic rifles rushed through the two gaping holes in the wall and shouted for the Ukrainians gathered outside the base headquarters building to move back. The Ukrainians stood their ground and responded with a stream of Russian curse words.

“We have done everything we could,” Mamchur told the men and women in his command. “You acted with honor. There is nothing we should be ashamed of.”

Then the Ukrainians lined up two deep and sang the Ukrainian national anthem.

The Ukrainian ship Slavutych in Sevastopol harbor was also stormed Saturday evening by a combination of Russian special forces and the Crimean “self defense” units they cooperate with, said a defense ministry official.

Vladislav Seleznyov, a ministry spokesman, said the incursion lasted two hours. The Slavutych has been boxed in for more than three weeks, unable to leave because the Russian Navy sank a ship at the entrance to the bay.

He also said that a Ukrainian ship in Donuzlav Bay, which is blocked in by a sunken ship at the entrance to the Black Sea, remains in Ukrainian hands.

The storming of the Belbek installation capped a surreal day characterized by spurts of melancholy, boredom, joy and calculated preparations for a takeover.

At 8:30 a.m., smoke wafted over the base near Sevastopol as soldiers tossed documents into two bonfires at the perimeter. Troops milled around killing time before a confrontation they knew was inevitable. One serviceman sat on a wall picking out a Beethoven melody on a piano app on his phone, “to lighten the mood,” he said.

When a group of Russians arrived to talk with Mamchur, he refused to allow them onto the base and instead walked out to meet them on a street corner. He leaned against a faded yellow taxi as the Russians urged him to give up weapons and allow his troops to depart along a planned safe corridor.

Residents of a nearby village gathered on the rise of a hill to watch. Several men shouted anti-gay slurs at the Ukrainian commander. A woman berated him loudly for having an armed security detail. Posters have appeared near the base saying that Mamchur should be executed. Some people shouted that he was hiding behind his troops to advance his own career. One man said the real commander was Mamchur’s wife.

Mamchur said he had no contact with the government in Kiev and was making decisions on his own. Several Ukrainian troops said they feel ignored and abandoned by the military leadership.

After the talks concluded with no agreement, Mamchur returned to the base to officiate at the wedding of the two lieutenants in his command. Both the bride and the groom wore blue jeans and black jackets, and more than 100 troops lined up to fete them with champagne, chocolates, figs and cookies.

“I am very happy you decided to marry now, and here,” Mamchur told them, then popped the first cork and danced with the bride’s best friend.

Soon another Russian officer appeared at the gate to deliver an ultimatum demanding that the Ukrainians surrender their weapons and abandon the base. They had one hour, Mamchur said he was told.

But one hour stretched into two and then three, as Russian vehicles rolled into position, visible from a distant hilltop. Women and elderly men from the village moved close to the fence and swore at the Ukrainian soldiers patrolling the perimeter. One elderly man tore down a “no trespassing” sign, angrily ripped it to pieces and tossed the pieces over the fence.

Uniformed men standing shoulder to shoulder suddenly appeared outside the gate. They seemed to be a mix of Russian regular troops wearing balaclavas and carrying sophisticated weaponry, Cossacks in fur hats, and unarmed pro-Russia militiamen. But when the assault began at 4:45 p.m., the force was all Russian regulars.

It took seconds for the armored vehicles to slice through the concrete walls, followed by a rush of infantrymen. Gunfire and the percussion boom of stun grenades filled the air.

“Why did you shoot?” one Ukrainian demanded angrily. “We didn’t fire a single round.”

“This is already Russia,” one Russian soldier shouted at the Ukrainian troops who refused to obey his order to move.

Ukrainian flags were still flying from the gatehouse and the flagpole outside base headquarters when journalists were rounded up and led away after having some of their camera equipment confiscated. The Russian banner was certain to replace those flags.

After the Russians took over the base, Mamchur reportedly was detained. Conflicting news reports on his whereabouts indicated he may have been released, but his former troops say they have not seen nor heard from him since Saturday.

Ukraine President Oleksandr Turchynov, in a statement, said Mamchur was “abducted” by Russian forces. He didn’t specify where Mamchur is believed to be held. However, prominent politician Vitali Klitschko said Sunday that Mamchur is being held by the Russian military in a jail in Sevastopol, the Crimean city that is the base of Russia’s Black Sea Fleet, according to the Associated Press.

Reaction in Europe

The base and ship takeovers came as Russia said it would not allow access to Crimea for international monitors who are being dispatched to Ukraine. Up to 400 monitors are to deploy across the country, including in Ukraine’s volatile south and east. Clashes in those areas in recent weeks between pro-Russian and pro-Ukrainian demonstrators have turned deadly. Pro-Russian rallies were held in the eastern Ukrainian cities of Donetsk and Kharkiv on Saturday.

The European Union, following the lead of the United States, added a dozen names Friday to its list of Russian officials subject to visa and financial restrictions. But efforts by eastern members of the E.U. to pursue much tougher measures were rebuffed by leaders of bigger countries worried about the consequences on their economies.

The Russian Foreign Ministry on Saturday called Europe’s moves “divorced from reality” and said Russia reserves the right to respond.

British Foreign Secretary William Hague said in an editorial in the Sunday Telegraph that Russia faced "isolation and stagnation" over its "outrageous land grab."

“This is the most serious risk to European security we have seen so far in the 21st Century,” Hague wrote.

He vowed that he and his fellow European leaders would not “run scared.”

Belarusian President Alexander Lukashenko, meanwhile, said Sunday that Russia's annexation of Crimea had set a “bad precedent.”

Englund reported from Moscow and Witte reported from London. Kathy Lally in Moscow contributed to this report.

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Germany's Lufthansa Offers In-Flight Meals for Home Delivery - NBC News

Germany's Lufthansa Offers In-Flight Meals for Home Delivery  - NBC News | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

MAINZ, Germany - In-flight fine dining may sound like an oxymoron to some, but Lufthansa is betting its meals are tasty enough that customers will want to eat them even when they aren't flying. The German airline has teamed up with an online supermarket to offer business class-fare for home delivery every Wednesday. The meals only need to be reheated. According to Max Thinius, a spokesman for supermarket Allyouneed.com, "a lot" of frequent fliers have already signed up for the service, although he did not say how many.

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Climate leaves European cities hesitant | Climate News Network

Climate leaves European cities hesitant | Climate News Network | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

European governments might have national targets to meet the demands of climate change. Many European cities, however, may not be in the mood.

 

Diana Reckien of Columbia University in the US and 11 European colleagues report in the journal Climatic Change that one in three cities have no plans to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, and seven out of 10 cities have no formal plans to adapt to climate change.

 

Cities – think factories, offices, cars, public transport, lighting, central heating, air conditioning, waste disposal and huge and continuous programmes of building, demolition and renewal with steel, concrete, brick and glass – account for between 31% and 80% of global greenhouse gas emissions.

 

Cities represent huge concentrations of people and economic investment, vulnerable to flood, windstorm, extremes of temperature and other climate-related violence. And cities don’t actually have to involve themselves in the complex international deals that bedevil government climate policies.

 

Cities are at liberty to decide to reduce emissions, and to adapt to any future hazards that citizens may identify.

 

The research went beyond questionnaire and interview. The researchers focused on action rather than words. They made a detailed analysis of 200 large and medium-sized urban areas – large means more than 250,000 people; medium is defined as more than 50,000 – in 11 European countries.

 

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European Cities and European governments not seeing eye to eye when it comes to climate changes

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CBC News - Latest Canada, World, Entertainment and Business News

CBC News - Latest Canada, World, Entertainment and Business News | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
The latest news from across Canada and around the world.

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A report on the state of Canada

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Kayleb Forsythe's curator insight, December 8, 2014 8:10 PM

Two days before Justin Bourque went on a shooting rampage, killing three Moncton Mounties and wounding two others, he told his father he was tired of being oppressed and would not submit to authority, court documents reveal. 

This is breaking news because people didn't really know what made Justin Bourque go on this shooting rampage.  It seems like he just had enough of being oppressed.  It is very sad he had to go to violence to be heard.

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The Missing 43: Mexico's Disappeared Students (Full Length) | VICE News

The Missing 43: Mexico's Disappeared Students (Full Length) | VICE News | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
VICE News follows the disappearance of 43 students from Guerrero, Mexico, as the parents of the missing and the community demand answers from increasingly suspicious authorities.

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Mexico in search of the missing students

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AUSTRALIA: Citizen scientists home in on crab menace

AUSTRALIA: Citizen scientists home in on crab menace | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

Perth fishermen have helped stop a 'nasty' crab invading West Australian waters which could have devastated local marine biodiversity.

 

The aggressive Asian Paddle Crab (Charybdis japonica) is found throughout south-east Asia and has a history of invading other waters; in New Zealand's North Island for example it has established itself by out-competing local crab species.

 

WA Fisheries scientist Mathew Hourston says introduced pests like this are one of the greatest threats to global marine biodiversity.

 

"Invaders like this can be very detrimental to the ecosystem and to get onto it early and get a handle on it, is very important in all biosecurity," Dr Hourston says.

 

"This is a really aggressive crab. People who have caught them in the Swan River have noted how nasty they are compared to our Blue Manna Crab.

 

"They also have potential to transfer diseases like white spot syndrome to other crabs and prawns."

 

The capture of a single crab in Western Australia in 2010 and again in 2012 resulted in widespread public awareness campaigns with flyers distributed through tackle shops, yacht clubs and hand-outs to fishermen by compliance officers.

 

Fisheries also launched intensive trapping assaults, with 935 traps placed over 12 months after each crab capture.

 

While the traps yielded nothing, a small number of crabs up to 10cm across the carapace (upper shell) were caught by members of the public in the Swan River in response to the public awareness campaigns.

 

Dr Hourston says the Asian Paddle Crab was an excellent candidate for a successful public awareness campaign.

 

"It's large and conspicuous; they really stand out a mile when you see them— because they are big and colourful with bright brown and purple patches," he says.

 

"We already had large numbers of crabbers out there, so it was a matter of designing a public information program to piggy-back on that.

 

"We've found the crab fishers have such great stewardship and ownership over the Swan and the crab fishery and they really want to do the right thing."

 

He says the campaign actively engaged the public in scientific research and dramatically increased the search effort for an invasive species to a level that would normally be cost prohibitive.

 

"Last one caught in January 2013. We're coming into the crabbing season now, and will be interested to see if anything turns up," Dr Hourston says.

 

Chinese mitten crab invades Scotland and poses threat to salmon and trout: http://phys.org/news/2014-09-chinese-mitten-crab-invades-scotland.html#inlRlv

 

Provided by Science Network WA

 

 

 

 

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Egypt through glass | Vincenzo di Giuseppe

Egypt through glass | Vincenzo di Giuseppe | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

 

This is how Egypt looks like from a window... it may be the window of a cab or a train's one. Maybe you are comfortably seated on a soft first class "armchair". Maybe you are looking outside from a packed metro wagon. It's all shot with X-E1 +35mm (high ISOs, small apertures and fast shutter speed) ...


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The look of Egypt through a picture 

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South Sudan Refugees Stranded Between Floods and Fight

South Sudan Refugees Stranded Between Floods and Fight | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
Given a choice between braving floods in her refugee camp in Ethiopia or returning home to war in South Sudan, Martha Nyakuk prefers the deluge of water.

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A huge flood leaves many stranded between high water and a war

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Samsung Galaxy A5, A3 launching in India soon, price Rs 20k, 27k - Real Time News, India

Samsung Galaxy A5, A3 launching in India soon, price Rs 20k, 27k - Real Time News, India | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
Real Time News, India Samsung Galaxy A5, A3 launching in India soon, price Rs 20k, 27k Real Time News, India Just three days after officially launching the new Samsung Galaxy A5 and the Samsung Galaxy A3, the Korean giant has set the ball in motion...

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Samsung launching new phones in India soon

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Asian Giant Hornet Kills 28 In East Asia, Also Spotted In US

Asian Giant Hornet Kills 28 In East Asia, Also Spotted In US | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
Asian giant hornets have killed 28 people in central China and are reportedly breeding in larger numbers this year. Experts say climate change may be responsible for the rise in the number of Asian giant hornets in central China.

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Dangerous hornets kill in China 

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littlebytesnews's curator insight, October 7, 2013 2:05 AM

YIKE...that's all we need...is this a message from above?? Biblical prophecy?? Or just a coincidence? 

Brittany Ortiz's curator insight, December 1, 2014 5:34 PM

Its crazy to think that now Asian Giant Hornets are also killing people. Not only did we recently just get a new infection that is killing many different people in the US and Africa, but now we also have to deal with a new potential disease that can kill people. We need to continue being aware of our surroundings and try to seek immediate help once you feel uneasy about yourself/health. 

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Hydroelectric power projects help northern Pakistan - Central Asia Online

Hydroelectric power projects help northern Pakistan - Central Asia Online | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it
Because the country suffers from a perennial power shortage, some localities are setting up independent plants to help meet demand.

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Central Asia countries trying to use hydroelectric power for more reliable energy source 

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mha's curator insight, December 20, 2013 1:00 PM

Pakistani villagers to take control of their power source after years of blackouts

Nicole Kearsch's curator insight, October 27, 2014 7:37 PM

After dealing with consistent power outages the people of a small village in northern Pakistan have decided to take matters into their own hands.  These people are turning to hydro power to help produce the electricity that they require.  In doing so they are setting up turbines along the river to create electricity.  The issue with this is that in the winter months the river recedes and there may not be enough water to power the turbines along the river.  Hopefully however there will still be enough to maybe not fully provide all the electricity needed but at least help more than the past.

Michael Mazo's curator insight, December 14, 2014 2:12 PM

Due to power shortages and not enough resources to supply the land, Central Asia has created hydroelectric power project in order to help facilitate the distribution of power. Central Asia has not been known to adopt green energy but the fact that they began to do so will create for a better economy and more successful industry. While some places are without power at all, these projects will help increase the standard of living 

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Terror in Central Asia: NATO's Great Game

In this age of manufactured terror, one of the most vital regions on the global chessboard is also an area that few in the West know anything about: Central ...

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NATO's game of terror 

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Russia's Political Future Seen in Its Self-Governing Past

Russia's Political Future Seen in Its Self-Governing Past | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

Grassroots activity not controlled by the government continues to spread, experts agree, though they list different groups as the main trailblazers of the process.

Pryanikov said religious communities, especially Muslims and protestants, are slowly accumulating civic functions, drifting ever closer in purpose to the zemstvo institutions of old.

Independent analyst Shelin said religious radicals and ultranationalists are also increasingly organizing themselves into groups, which does not bode well for the future. Russian volunteers spearheaded the recent pro-Russian insurgency in eastern Ukraine and staged a nationwide support campaign for the bloody rebellion, widely seen internationally as an imperialist escapade by Russia.
But Roshchin said lobby groups standing for practical interests are more likely to be community builders.

He named homeowner associations, parents' committees at schools, consumer rights groups and labor unions — currently defunct or loyal to the Kremlin — as examples, while Pryanikov added motorist groups to the list. Russian motorists have staged numerous protests, including against car import bans and road privileges for officials, proving themselves a highly organized and active community.
"We won't be entering the 21st century until we have public self-organization," Shelin said. "But so far, it has been one step forward, two steps back."


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What does the future hold for Russia

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Trampoline to Space? Russian Official Tells NASA to Take a Flying Leap | NBC News

Trampoline to Space? Russian Official Tells NASA to Take a Flying Leap | NBC News | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

Russian Deputy Prime Minister Dmitry Rogozin, a target of U.S. sanctions sparked by the Ukraine crisis, said Tuesday that those sanctions would boomerang against America's space effort and essentially told NASA to take a flying leap ... on a trampoline.

"After analyzing the sanctions against our space industry, I suggest to the USA to bring their astronauts to the International Space Station using a trampoline," Rogozin said via his Russian-language Twitter account.

 


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Nick Smith's insight:

Another space race?

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European Borders Through History | National Geographic Education

European Borders Through History | National Geographic Education | bctcgeo152 | Scoop.it

Students compare maps of European borders at three points in history: after World War I, after World War II, and the 2011 European Union (EU) countries.

 

Students look for political borders that have changed and others that have remained the same, and compare those to what they know about cultural and physical geography in Europe and in their own state or local area.

 

Click headline to access the lesson plan--


Via Chuck Sherwood, Senior Associate, TeleDimensions, Inc
Nick Smith's insight:

Map Comparison in Europe

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Zach & Wafeeq's curator insight, February 11, 2015 9:00 PM

[EUROPE] Geography/Area: This is Geo/Area because it shows a link which leads to show the changing of the European map. European Reach has changed drastically over the years. The area has changed, and im pretty sure small parts of the geography have changed.

Sino and Makena's curator insight, February 12, 2015 11:22 PM

In America, students learn about the growth of America and the change in areas and borders throught its history. Only 200 years of history that is. Europe has thousands of years of history, making the observation in changes of borders in Europe quite a heafty topic of research!

michael bannikoff's curator insight, May 28, 2015 8:03 AM

Gives students information on how Europe has been shaped through history. Students are able to see how wars, annexation and other historical events have shaped modern Europe.