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Rescooped by Charlie Scuilla from Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus
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Tomorrow's Rechargeable Batteries Might Never Wear Out

Tomorrow's Rechargeable Batteries Might Never Wear Out | batteries | Scoop.it

The problem with lithium ion batteries is that the more discharge cycles you put them through, the less efficient the negative electrode becomes at holding electrons. SE


Via Joel Barker, Richard Platt
Charlie Scuilla's insight:

This concept is hard to believe - I have not seen any data that suggests this miracle.

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Richard Platt's curator insight, November 19, 2013 6:45 PM

Cool future for batteries

Rescooped by Charlie Scuilla from Research
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New Spectroscopic Technique Could Accelerate the Push for Better Batteries

New Spectroscopic Technique Could Accelerate the Push for Better Batteries | batteries | Scoop.it

A new technique developed at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source could help scientists better understand and improve the materials required for high-performance lithium-ion batteries that power EVs and other applications.

The technique, which uses soft X-ray spectroscopy, measures something never seen before: the migration of ions and electrons in an integrated, operating battery electrode.

Over the past several years, scientists have developed several ways to study the changes in a working electrode. These include techniques based on hard X-rays, electron microscopy, neutron scattering, and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging.

But most of these methods track structural changes. They don’t track electron and ion dynamics directly, which is very important in the push to understand and optimize battery performance.

“In order to improve battery materials, we need to study charge dynamics in a complete electrode while it’s operating – and our approach does that,” says Wanli Yang, a scientist at Berkeley Lab’s Advanced Light Source who developed the technique with Gao Liu of Berkeley Lab’s Environmental Energy Technologies Division.


Via Alin Velea
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Rescooped by Charlie Scuilla from Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus
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Video "Improving Lithium-Ion Batteries with Nanowires"

New research led by electrical engineer Shadi Dayeh of the University of California, San Diego is aimed at improving lithium-ion batteries through possible new electrode architectures with precise nano-scale designs.

Via Richard Platt
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Richard Platt's curator insight, November 18, 2013 4:53 PM

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): Nanowires are starting to show promise - Great new direction for Li-ion batteries, 

Rescooped by Charlie Scuilla from Internet of Things - Company and Research Focus
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Video "Improving Lithium-Ion Batteries with Nanowires"

New research led by electrical engineer Shadi Dayeh of the University of California, San Diego is aimed at improving lithium-ion batteries through possible new electrode architectures with precise nano-scale designs.

Via Richard Platt
more...
Richard Platt's curator insight, November 18, 2013 4:53 PM

(from the Curator of IoT & Wearables): Nanowires are starting to show promise - Great new direction for Li-ion batteries, 

Rescooped by Charlie Scuilla from Research
Scoop.it!

Composite battery boost

Composite battery boost | batteries | Scoop.it

New composite materials based on selenium (Se) sulfides that act as the positive electrode in a rechargeable lithium-ion (Li-ion) battery could boost the range of electric vehicles by up to five times, according to groundbreaking research carried out at the U.S. Department of Energy's Advanced Photon Source at Argonne National Laboratory. The studies of the materials demonstrated that they have the potential to pack five times the energy density of conventional batteries. Lithium-ion batteries are ubiquitous in rechargeable gadgets such as cell phones, tablet PCs, and GPS devices, as well as early electric vehicles. As any user of these technologies will testify, the amount of charge Li-ion batteries can hold between power outlets can stand improving, and all-electric vehicles in particular will benefit from a longer lasting battery. The problem is that existing electrode materials, while relatively effective, cannot pack much electrical energy into a small volume and so range is limited.


Via Alin Velea
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