Human Rights and the Will to be free
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Bahrain, MENA & Arab Spring
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Open Letter from Nabeel Rajab to President Obama

Open Letter from Nabeel Rajab to President Obama | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
From: Nabeel Rajab
President of the Bahrain Center for Human Rights
Isa Town Detention Center
Bahrain

Dear President Obama,

I write to you from a Bahraini jail cell, and this message was never meant to go beyond its walls. Even though I have never advocated for violence nor harmed another living soul, I have spent 28 of the last 36 months in a Bahraini prison for actions that can only be counted as crimes in a nation that stifles free expression and criminalizes open assembly. I have documented my government’s use of torture. I have reported on civilian casualties in Yemen. I have held a different opinion than that of a king. In retaliation, I may spend the next ten years of my life in jail.


While my government punishes me for demanding an end to its assault on civil and political rights, other GCC states, especially Saudi Arabia, subject human rights defenders to harsher abuse. Their repression can be seen in the flogging of free speech activist Raif Badawi and the death sentence against the religious scholar and human rights advocate Nimr al-Nimr. Saudi courts even sentenced Raif’s lawyer, Waleed abu al-Khair, to 15 years in prison. We as human rights defenders are targeted for giving voice to the marginalized, people seeking to take the reins of their own destiny; our governments do everything in their power to prevent us from acting upon the best ideals of our conscience.

The message you directed toward your Gulf allies last week laid the foundation for real change. Your words tacitly acknowledged what we in the region understand: only democracy can bring stability to the Middle East. And while democracy may take time to develop, the process cannot begin unless our right to free speech is protected. Right now, our governments divide us along religious lines, preventing us from collectively challenging extremism within our societies. As well, our rulers aggressively punish critics of the humanitarian catastrophe in Yemen. We simply ask, however, for greater democratic participation in our nation’s affairs, and the ability to freely express our contempt for violence and extremism.

I thank your administration for calling for my release, and the release of my fellow human rights defenders. I urge you to defend our right to free speech when you meet with the monarchs of the Gulf, and call for:

The immediate and unconditional release of all political prisoners;
An end to the criminalization of free speech and expression, including any laws against criticism of government institutions or defamation of a king;
The cessation of all acts of torture and reprisal in GCC detention centers; and
The protection of free and open civil society space capable of fostering long-term stability and growth in the region.
The citizens of Bahrain and her neighbors have extraordinary potential. With unshackled voices, we can build stability and challenge extremism. What we need today is space for tolerance, plurality, and honest dialogue, the foundations of a democratic process that the reprisals against me and my colleagues seek to undermine.

 
Yours Sincerely,

Nabeel Rajab
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How Obama Caved on Bahrain

How Obama Caved on Bahrain | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

"...

Way back in 2011, when the Arab Spring began and protests spread across the country, demanding more democracy and better representation for Shiites, Obama himself pressed for change in Bahrain. In February 2011, as protesters massed in the tens of thousands at Manama’s Pearl Roundabout, the president issued a statement welcoming reform plans — which, alas, were never really carried through — announced by King Hamad bin Isa Al Khalifa. Obama reaffirmed that it was the U.S. position that Bahrain’s stability would be ensured through “respecting the universal rights of the people of Bahrain and reforms that meet the aspirations of all Bahrainis.”

The king, however, answered Obama’s call for reform with more repression. On March 14, he invited in troops from Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates to help put down the protests. Thousands of security forces stormed the Pearl Roundabout demonstrations on March 16, clearing the protest camp and arresting its leaders. Two days later, the Pearl Monument at the center of the roundabout, which had become an icon of the protests, was demolished, and closed the area off to the public.

In the aftermath of the crackdown, Obama’s tone on Bahrain noticeably toughened. The message was clear: Stability must depend on respecting the rights of the people, not on foreign troops. When the president gave a major speech on the Middle East in May 2011, he was even more critical of Bahrain and its policy of repression: “We have insisted both publicly and privately that mass arrests and brute force are at odds with the universal rights of Bahrain’s citizens, and … such steps will not make legitimate calls for reform go away.”

Later in that speech, he said that Shiites “must never have their mosques destroyed in Bahrain,” raising one of the most explosive aspects of how the Sunni government has attempted to suppress protests by the Shiite majority.

In Obama’s September 2011 address to the U.N. General Assembly, the tiny country got a whole paragraph. The president said that the United States “will continue to call on the government and the main opposition bloc — the Wifaq — to pursue a meaningful dialogue that brings peaceful change that is responsive to the people.” He also said that reforms had been made, but that “more is required” — three words that amounted to a clear message that the monarchy was falling short. The White House was not about to let the king off the hook — and the president himself was raising the issue, not some spokesperson.

What has happened since then? Not much.

There has been little or no progress in Bahrain — domestic tensions have instead risen higher. Everything President Obama demanded has been refused. In June 2011, an independent commission was established to examine the events during the early months of the uprising, and in November it reported its findings to the king. Its recommendations, however, were roundly ignored: In 2012, the commission’s chairman, law professor Cherif Bassiouni, delivered what George Washington University’s Marc Lynch termed a “scathing critique of its failure to undertake any deeper political or social reforms.”

Bassiouni has given the government credit for taking a number of his recommendations — even as he laid out Manama’s failings to resolve the underlying grievances of the protests. “There are very, very fundamental social and economic issues involved in the Shiite population that need to be addressed, and have not been addressed,” he said in a 2014 interview. “When you have people who do not have the hope of seeing themselves as equal citizens, as having equal opportunities in a particular country, living in mostly economic underprivileged areas in high-density population areas, they explode.”

Others are even more critical. In May 2014, Human Rights Watch issued areport finding that, despite the king’s promised reforms, “members of security forces are rarely prosecuted for unlawful killings, including in detention, and the few convictions have carried extremely light sentences.”

The Bahraini government has also adopted new methods to silence opposition voices. In January 2015, it stripped 72 citizens of their nationality, renderingmany of them stateless. As Amnesty International pointed out, the authorities included human rights and political activists on the same list as Bahrainis who allegedly went to fight with the Islamic State (IS). So the government of Bahrain is trying to equate peaceful protest with jihadi terrorism.

While the government is painting all protesters as “terrorists” who support the Islamic State, its own policy appears to be one of promoting sectarian divisions.

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Here Are The Most Horrific Details From The US Senate Torture Report

Here Are The Most Horrific Details From The US Senate Torture Report | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
On Tuesday, the Senate Intelligence Committee released the long-awaited summary of its torture report, revealing horrific details about the CIA's post-9/11 detention and interrogation program.

Many of the details in the report are sickening and gr...
Spencer Haskins's insight:

Bush was horrid, Obama continues the torture with force feeding prisoners at Gitmo!    American 'government' is a total failure!  
America is now just a state exporter of terrorism! 

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USA: Release the Torture Report Now!

USA:  Release the Torture Report Now! | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
Join us and sign the petition: Tell Sen. Mark Udall and the Senate Intelligence Committee to enter the CIA torture report into the Congressional Record.
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A Failure of Democracy and Human Rights »

A Failure of Democracy and Human Rights » | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
It is a sad day for democracy when 12 Nobel Peace Laureates write a letter to President Barak Obama urging him to close one of the darkest chapters of recent U.S. history by acknowledging, and then rejecting, the “flagrant use of torture and other violations of international law” that had been conducted with the excuse of “fighting for terrorism” since 2001. That the recipient of the letter is a Nobel Peace Prize Laureate himself makes the situation ludicrous. That he presides over the country purported to be one of the world’s leading democracies makes the situation even more incongruous.

For those of us who used to admire President Obama for his avowed stand on human rights, his reelection seemed to give him the opportunity to fulfill the promises he made regarding the closure of Guantanamo, the use of torture and the killing of innocent people in several countries in conflict.

However, we are still to see a determined action from him on the human rights front, to which he only paid so far lip service. And it makes us wonder who really holds power in the U.S.? How is it possible that the president of the most powerful country in the world is unable to rally the support necessary to end one of the most disgraceful policies of the U.S. government?

Although six months have passed since the Senate’s Select Committee on Intelligence voted to release its 480-page executive summary of its review of the nation’s “enhanced interrogation” program, the release of the unabridged and uncensored summary has not yet happened.

The reasons for this situation are not a secret. As the Committee’s leader, California’s Senator Dianne Feinstein stated last April, “The report exposes brutality that stands in stark contrast to our values as a nation. It chronicles a stain in our history that must never again be allowed to happen.”
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Amnesty International Sends Human Rights Delegation to Ferguson, Missouri

Amnesty International Sends Human Rights Delegation to Ferguson, Missouri | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
Today, Amnesty International USA announced that it has sent human rights delegation to Ferguson, MO to observe police and protester activity, gather testimony, seek meetings with officials and offer support to the community.
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Corporate Human Rights Abuses Are Fine, United States Tells the UN

Corporate Human Rights Abuses Are Fine, United States Tells the UN | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Good news: The United Nations has recently approved the implementation of a legally binding body that can punish corporations that commit human rights abuses.

Bad news: The United States is furious and says it will refuse to abide by any repercussions this Human Rights Council-approved body should assign.

Up until now, the UN’s standards for corporate accountability have been strictly voluntarily. Resolving that waving a metaphorical finger at companies that commit human rights abuses was insufficient, in 2013, Ecuador initiated a proposal to hold international offenders responsible for their immoral actions. More than 80 other countries signed on, agreeing that actual accountability was necessary to diminish human rights abuse. With help from South Africa, Ecuador finally convinced the HRC to vote on the issue last week; the resolution passed by a 20-14 vote.

Alas, it’s the nations who voted no that are being the most vocal at this point, with the United States and nations in the European Union leading the charge. Before the vote, they lobbied hard to have nations reject Ecuador’s proposal; since losing, they have thrown what amounts to a hissy fit. ...“



Read more: http://www.care2.com/causes/corporate-human-rights-abuses-are-fine-united-states-tells-the-un.html#ixzz36jXyPN00

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UN Human Rights Committee finds US in violation on 25 counts

UN Human Rights Committee finds US in violation on 25 counts | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

While President Obama told the country to “look forward, not backward” when it came to Bush’s torture program, the United Nations has taken a different route. Recently, the U.N. Human Rights Committeeissued a report excoriating the United States for its human rights violations. It focuses on violations of theInternational Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, to which the country is party.

Prisoners at the infamous Angola, a 17,000-acre former slave plantation that serves as the Louisiana State Penitentiary, return from a long day’s work in the fields, their white overseer spurring on the marching Black men.

The report mentions 25 human rights issues where the United States is failing. This piece will focus on a few of those issues – Guantanamo, NSA surveillance, accountability for Bush-era human rights violations, drone strikes, racism in the prison system, racial profiling, police violence and criminalization of the homeless

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U.N. Human Rights Committee Gives U.S. Bad Grade on ICCPR

U.N. Human Rights Committee Gives U.S. Bad Grade on ICCPR | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

...However, the “principal matters of concern” far outnumber the “positive aspects.” For instance, the U.S. is not applying the Covenant to “individuals under its jurisdiction but outside its territory.” NSA surveillance concerns the HRC, as does the fact that the U.S. uses drones for targeted killings. According to the HRC’s concluding observations, the U.S. is not holding members of the Armed Forces and other government agents accountable for unlawful killings, torture, inhuman treatment or punishment of U.S. detainees. The justice system displays racial disparities and employs racial profiling. There are some states in the U.S. in which the death penalty is legal. There is no timeline for Guantanamo Bay’s closure. There are “continuing high numbers of gun-related deaths” and domestic violence, and the HRC is concerned that “Stand Your Ground Laws” are used to get around self-defense limits. Corporal punishment of children is used in the home, school, and penal institutions. The rates of excessive force by law enforcement officials, the continued practice of prolonged solitary confinement in adults and juveniles who are deprived of their liberty, the criminalization of homelessness, and the “lack of comprehensive legislation criminalizing all forms of torture, including mental torture” are all stated concerns of the HRC. Some courts still retain the ability to use their discretion to render life without parole sentences for juveniles convicted of homicide offenses and adults convicted of non-homicide offenses.  State-level felon disenfranchisement laws take away voting rights.  Mental health services use electroshock, psychiatric medication, and other coercive and restrictive practices....

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Lenicholas Rosenbell Jr.'s curator insight, October 11, 2015 1:30 PM

Golden Ideas: The racial profiling in the US has drawn attention on a global scale to the degree in which the UN feels as though they must step in and draw attention to the fact. The US is relying on its diplomacy to not be mandated to change the policies, however a change will start to happen soon if the untied states does not "clean up its act."

Thorns: The US has more negative human rights issues that positive human rights accomplishments. The negatives range from gun violence to racial profiling to xenophobia to torture, both physical and mental.

Questions I still have: As a young person I can't really do anything to change legislation, is there a way that I can support human rights and be heard? How can I lead by example when people are preaching right to bear arms and freedom of speech so strongly?

 

LENA G

Amy Argenal's comment, October 26, 2015 2:54 PM
I am really appreciating all of your questions!
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Human Rights Panel Criticizes U.S.

Human Rights Panel Criticizes U.S. | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

A United Nations human rights panel has called for more oversight and transparency in the program of targeted drone strikes carried out by the United States and recommended the prosecution of all those involved in unlawful killings and torture overseas, particularly “persons in command positions.” In a report released Thursday, the United Nations Human Rights Committee, a panel of 18 independent experts from different countries, expressed concern that the United States government had not clarified the criteria or legal basis for drone strikes and called for independent oversight of the program. It also drew attention to the limited number of investigations into unlawful killings and the use of torture in overseas operations by the American military and private contractors. It said the responsibility of those who “provided legal pretexts for manifestly illegal behavior should also be established” and urged the government to declassify and release the Senate Intelligence Committee’s investigation into the Central Intelligence Agency’s secret rendition activities....

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UN watchdog condemns US for human rights failures

UN watchdog condemns US for human rights failures | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

A United States delegation to the U.N. faced blistering criticism from an international committee in Geneva over a slew of human rights concerns on Friday, including stand your ground laws, the death penalty, voting rights and racial disparities in education.

“What we are finding is that the U.S. government is out of step with its obligations under international human rights law,” said Ejim Dike, executive director of the U.S. Human Rights Network, who attended the questioning before the U.N.’s Human Rights Committee. “I would say the U.S. government response so far has not been adequate.”

Over the course of two days, members of the human rights committee grilled the 32-person delegation from the United States over a long list of issues highlighted by an umbrella group of human and civil rights groups and non-governmental organizations. The questioning was part of the Human Rights Committees’ periodic review of compliance under the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights, a pact signed by 167 countries in 1976.

Groups including the Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, the NAACP, the Dream Defenders and a host of other organizations sent representatives to Geneva as lobbyists and observers. Many of the groups filed a joint submission ahead of the review detailing issues and concerns. Those concerns included abuses by American border patrol agents, the federal government’s inability to tamp down zero-tolerance school discipline policies and police brutality.

“We’re not meeting international human rights standards and most people in the United States are under the impression that our laws meet human rights standards,” Dike said. “But we are not exceptional and the U.S. government should be held to the same standard as the rest of the world when it comes to international human rights.”

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Statement on US President Obama’s surveillance speech | Human Rights Watch

Statement on US President Obama’s surveillance speech | Human Rights Watch | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

...

President Obama today announced a number of welcome reforms to the National Security Agency (NSA) surveillance programs, but fell short on core human rights concerns: the collection of data in bulk on people worldwide, including in the US, and giving foreigners clear rights against unwarranted US surveillance. 

Specifically, on the bulk metadata collection program, the President said that bulk telephone metadata should no longer be held by the government. But we don’t know the details of how the program will move out of government hands, and it remains to be seen whether this is a viable option. Further, significant questions remain as to why collection en mass is still necessary to begin with given that mass collection by the NSA has not proven necessary to prevent any terrorist attacks. In addition, the President said nothing about any other bulk collection programs that could be happening under Section 215....

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US drone strikes could be classed as war crimes, says Amnesty International

US drone strikes could be classed as war crimes, says Amnesty International | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
Joint report with Human Rights Watch judges US attacks in Yemen and Pakistan to have broken international human rights law
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US: Human Rights Watch Sues Over Surveillance | Human Rights Watch

US: Human Rights Watch Sues Over Surveillance | Human Rights Watch | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
(Washington, DC) – Human Rights Watch filed suit on April 7, 2015, against the US Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) for illegally collecting records of the organization’s telephone calls to foreign countries.

The DEA disclosed the existence of its mass surveillance program in January 2015, after a federal judge ordered the government to disclose more information about the program. The agency made the disclosure in a criminal case against a man accused of violating export restrictions on goods to Iran.

“At Human Rights Watch we work with people who are sometimes in life or death situations, where speaking out can make them a target,” said Dinah PoKempner, general counsel at Human Rights Watch. “Whom we communicate with and when is often extraordinarily sensitive – and it’s information that we wouldn’t turn over to the government lightly.”

Human Rights Watch is represented by the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), which has filed a series of legal challenges against unconstitutional government surveillance.
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Mass surveillance is fundamental threat to human rights, says European report

Mass surveillance is fundamental threat to human rights, says European report | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Europe’s top rights body has said mass surveillance practices are a fundamental threat to human rights and violate the right to privacy enshrined in European law.

The parliamentary assembly of the Council of Europe says in a report that it is “deeply concerned” by the “far-reaching, technologically advanced systems” used by the US and UK to collect, store and analyse the data of private citizens. It describes the scale of spying by the US National Security Agency, revealed by Edward Snowden, as “stunning”....

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U.N. Criticizes U.S. on Torture and Array of Human Rights Issues

U.N. Criticizes U.S. on Torture and Array of Human Rights Issues | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
The United Nations Committee Against Torture released a report Friday that deeply criticized the U.S. for its responses and investigations — or lack thereof ...
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Obama continues HIS human rights abuses....

Obama continues HIS human rights abuses.... | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
WASHINGTON — The Obama administration has repeatedly asked Congress to exempt its military effort against the Islamic State from a longstanding ban on U.S. assistance to torturers and war criminals, highlighting doubts about finding "clean" American allies in a region wracked by ethnic animosity and religious extremism.
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"A Human Rights Crisis": In Unprecedented Move, Amnesty International Sends Monitors to Ferguson

"A Human Rights Crisis": In Unprecedented Move, Amnesty International Sends Monitors to Ferguson | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
After a week that saw a militarized police crackdown and the imposition of a nighttime curfew, Amnesty International USA has taken an "unprecedented" step by sending a 13-person delegation to monitor the developments in Ferguson, Missouri. It is the first time the Amnesty organization has deployed observers inside the United States. We speak to Steven Hawkins, executive director of Amnesty International USA.
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Al Khalifa dynasty’s days are short - analyst - Interviews - Panorama | Armenian news

Al Khalifa dynasty’s days are short - analyst - Interviews - Panorama | Armenian news | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

"...

I think the world outside of the United Sates knows more about the oppression in Bahrain than people in the United States and the United States government is trying to keep it quiet because every crime that is going on in Bahrain, the suppression of freedom of speech, the denial of human rights, the torture that is going on in the jails and the indiscriminate jailing of anybody who voices their opinion against the autocratic monarchy they get jailed and tortured and killed and that contradicts everything the United States supposedly stands for.

It contradicts democracy, it contradicts human rights, it contradicts women’s rights, it contradicts the rights of free conscience and that is why the United States does not want to air its dirty linen because Bahrain is the United States’ dirty linen.

We are responsible for the murder that is going on there and the United States government knows it and that is why most of the people in the State Department are appalled about what we are doing in Bahrain and they do not like it...."

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Freed From Prison, Bahraini Activist Nabeel Rajab Urges U.S. to Stop Backing Regime’s Crackdown

Freed From Prison, Bahraini Activist Nabeel Rajab Urges U.S. to Stop Backing Regime’s Crackdown | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Nabeel Rajab, head of the Bahrain Centre for Human Rights, joins us after nearly two years behind bars for his role in pro-democracy protests. With the critical backing of the U.S. and neighboring Gulf states, the Bahraini government has waged a crackdown on opposition protesters since an uprising broke out in February 2011. "We have been abandoned by the American government, we have been ignored completely," Rajab says. "They support a dictatorship here... no one can change their policy except the American people." We are also joined by Human Rights Watch’s Josh Colangelo, author of a new report that finds Bahrain’s courts have played a key role in maintaining the country’s highly repressive political order, routinely sentencing peaceful protesters to lengthy prison terms.

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Native Americans Say US Violated Human Rights

Native Americans Say US Violated Human Rights | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

The Onondaga Indian Nation says it plans to file a petition at the Organization of American States on Tuesday, seeking human rights violations against the United States government. It wants the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to declare that the U.S. government's decision not to hear its lawsuit asking for the return of 2.5 million acres in upstate New York to be violations of international human rights agreements.

The nation has argued that about 4,000 square miles in 11 upstate New York counties stretching from Pennsylvania to Canada was illegally taken through a series of bogus treaties. More than 875,000 people live in the area, which includes Syracuse and other cities.

U.S. courts have refused to hear the lawsuit asking for the return of their land, with the Supreme Court turning away a final petition in October.

"The problem is that we can't get the governor to sit down with us and the United States to live up to its treaty rights," said the Onondaga Nation's attorney, Joe Heath.

While in Washington, the group plans to display a belt that George Washington had commissioned to commemorate one of the treaties that was supposed to guarantee the Onondaga their land and "the free use and enjoyment thereof."

The group says it is not seeking monetary damages, eviction of residents or rental payments. Instead, it wants a declaration that the land continues to belong to the Onondagas and that federal treaties were violated when it was taken away. Onondaga leaders have said they would use their claim to force the cleanup of hazardous, polluted sites like Onondaga Lake.

The petition against the United States was brought by the Onondaga Nation and the Haudenosaunee Confederacy, which is made up of the Onondaga, Mohawk, Oneida, Cayuga and Seneca Nations....

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Gov't sanctioned murder of American citizen in Albuquerque, NM., USA!

Gov't sanctioned murder of American citizen in Albuquerque, NM., USA! | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Greetings city of Albuquerque, we are Anonymous. Recently, a video has been released to the public which shows Albuquerque Police Officers murdering a man in cold blood for ‘illegally camping’. This man, which was schizophrenic, obviously had no intention of hurting these police officers, on the contrary, this man looks as if he is simply attempting to protect himself from visually fierce militarized thugs. Whether this man had a history of crime is irrelevant. We drastically need to address the growing police state that has occupied our country. When will we say no more? How many more citizens will be murdered? Naturally, the APD will attempt to label Anonymous as a terrorist organization for our demands of justice, but the question has to be asked. Who do we terrorize? Is it not a growing police state that terrorizes it’s own citizens?   APD you now have the full attention of Anonymous. To the citizens of Albuquerque, it’s time to organize. On March 30th we are asking the citizens of Albuquerque to occupy the APD HQ and occupy the sites of the Albuquerque Police Department. Let them know that your city is not a place for war games against the homeless and the less fortunate. Anonymous grab your cannons and aim them at Albuquerque police websites.

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US boycotts UN human rights conference with drone resolution looming

US boycotts UN human rights conference with drone resolution looming | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it

Pakistani leaders hope to convince the United Nations Human Rights Council to pass a resolution that would force US drone strikes to adhere to international law – a request that inspired the US to boycott the talks altogether, according to a new report.

The draft of a Pakistani resolution, first reported by Colum Lynch of Foreign Policy, proposes that nations “ensure transparency” when discussing drone strikes and “conduct prompt, independent and impartial investigations whenever there are indications of any violations to human rights caused by their use.”

While official numbers are nonexistent, experts have suggested that anywhere from 200 to nearly 1,000 Pakistani civilians have been killed by US drone strikes, with as many as 200 children possibly among that total.

The issue of drone strikes, while remaining largely out of US headlines, has become one of the most polarizing in Pakistan. While previous reports have made it clear that Pakistani leaders have authorized at least some drone strikes, they publicly maintain that that unmanned American aerial vehicles constantly buzzing in the skies undermine Pakistan’s sovereignty.

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THE USA REGIME DESTROYS HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY IN THE WORLD

THE USA REGIME DESTROYS HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY IN THE WORLD | Human Rights and the Will to be free | Scoop.it
THE USA REGIME DESTROYS HUMAN RIGHTS AND DEMOCRACY IN THE MUSLIM AND THIRD WORLD COUNTRIES by Syarif HidayatAmerica has long been the self-appointed global leader on human rights and democracy poin...
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Yemen Human Rights Minister takes outrage over drones to the media

In an opinion piece published on Tuesday in the Washington Post, Human Rights Minister Hooriah Mashour expressed her opposition of US-led drone attacks in Yemen by denouncing the ruins they leave in their trail.
An activist at heart and a fierce advocate for human dignity and Yemen’ s national sovereignty, Minister Mashour has long denounced Washington anti-terror policy in Yemen, having warned in many instances that drones would only generate more hatred and trauma than they are worth. In line with security experts and analysts, Minister Mashour would rather see the government implement a strategy which seeks to uproot Islamic radicalism at its base, through educational program and awareness campaigns than bomb civilian communities on the off chance that militants might happen to be present.
After December 12th astronomical miss, Minister Mashour chose to speak out on behalf of the Yemen, hoping that on some level, the greater public will stop associating Yemenis with terrorism and emphasize instead with its people’s tragic losses.
Weeks after a US drone mistaken a wedding convoy for al-Qaeda militants, Yemen’s outrage still echoes across all provinces. Keen to highlight the sheer magnitude of Washington’s miss, the minister wrote, “December 12 was supposed to be a day of celebration for the al-Ameri family. A young bride traveled to her wedding with her relatives in Bayda province, Yemen. But in a few dark seconds their celebrations were eviscerated.”
She added, “The strike is said to have killed at least 14 civilians and injured 22 others, over a third of them seriously. This marks the largest death toll by a drone strike in Yemen since the drone war’s inception. It is also the largest death toll by U.S. strike since December 2009, when a U.S. cruise missile killed 41 civilians in al-Majala, including 14 women and 21 children.”
A voice among many, Minister Mashour’s message is simple: drones as per noted by Jeremy Scahill and most recently by Nabeel Khoury, former U.S. deputy chief of mission to Yemen, drones only serve al-Qaeda.

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Nevermore Sithole's curator insight, January 16, 2014 8:40 AM
Yemen Human Rights Minister