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Rescooped by Ludovic Saint-Felix from Plants and Microbes
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Annual Review of Phytopathology: Susceptibility Genes 101: How to Be a Good Host (2014)

Annual Review of Phytopathology: Susceptibility Genes 101: How to Be a Good Host (2014) | Back to science | Scoop.it

To confer resistance against pathogens and pests in plants, typically dominant resistance genes are deployed. However, because resistance is based on recognition of a single pathogen-derived molecular pattern these narrowspectrum genes are usually readily overcome. Disease arises from a compatible interaction between plant and pathogen. Hence, altering a plant gene that critically facilitates compatibility could provide a more broad-spectrum and durable type of resistance. Here, such susceptibility (S) genes are reviewed with a focus on the mechanisms underlying loss of compatibility. We distinguish three groups of S genes acting during different stages of infection: early pathogen establishment, modulation of host defenses, and pathogen sustenance. The many examples reviewed here show that S genes have the potential to be used in resistance breeding. However, because S genes have a function other than being a compatibility factor for the pathogen, the side effects caused by their mutation demands a one-by-one assessment of their usefulness for application.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Rescooped by Ludovic Saint-Felix from Café des Sciences
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Ce virus inconnu présent chez un humain sur deux

Ce virus inconnu présent chez un humain sur deux | Back to science | Scoop.it

Il y a tout un monde dans nos boyaux.Le chiffre est souvent donné tellement il est éloquent : on estime que les cellules composant notre corps sont dix fois moins nombreuses que les cellules des micro-organismes (bactéries, champignons, protistes,...


Via Goulu
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Rescooped by Ludovic Saint-Felix from Plants and Microbes
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New Phytologist: Hitchhiker's guide to multi-dimensional plant pathology (2014)

New Phytologist: Hitchhiker's guide to multi-dimensional plant pathology (2014) | Back to science | Scoop.it

Filamentous pathogens pose a substantial threat to global food security. One central question in plant pathology is how pathogens cause infection and manage to evade or suppress plant immunity to promote disease. With many technological advances over the past decade, including DNA sequencing technology, an array of new tools has become embedded within the toolbox of next-generation plant pathologists. By employing a multidisciplinary approach plant pathologists can fully leverage these technical advances to answer key questions in plant pathology, aimed at achieving global food security. This review discusses the impact of: cell biology and genetics on progressing our understanding of infection structure formation on the leaf surface; biochemical and molecular analysis to study how pathogens subdue plant immunity and manipulate plant processes through effectors; genomics and DNA sequencing technologies on all areas of plant pathology; and new forms of collaboration on accelerating exploitation of big data. As we embark on the next phase in plant pathology, the integration of systems biology promises to provide a holistic perspective of plant–pathogen interactions from big data and only once we fully appreciate these complexities can we design truly sustainable solutions to preserve our resources.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Marie Zen Attitude's curator insight, July 26, 2014 8:21 AM

Un petit lien spécial pour Emeric ;)

 

Rescooped by Ludovic Saint-Felix from Plants and Microbes
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Molecular Plant Pathology: Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology (2013)

Molecular Plant Pathology: Top 10 plant-parasitic nematodes in molecular plant pathology (2013) | Back to science | Scoop.it

The aim of this review was to undertake a survey of researchers working with plant-parasitic nematodes in order to determine a ‘top 10’ list of these pathogens based on scientific and economic importance. Any such list will not be definitive as economic importance will vary depending on the region of the world in which a researcher is based. However, care was taken to include researchers from as many parts of the world as possible when carrying out the survey. The top 10 list emerging from the survey is composed of: (1) root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.); (2) cyst nematodes (Heterodera and Globodera spp.); (3) root lesion nematodes (Pratylenchus spp.); (4) the burrowing nematode Radopholus similis; (5) Ditylenchus dipsaci; (6) the pine wilt nematode Bursaphelenchus xylophilus; (7) the reniform nematodeRotylenchulus reniformis; (8) Xiphinema index (the only virus vector nematode to make the list); (9) Nacobbus aberrans; and (10)Aphelenchoides besseyi. The biology of each nematode (or nematode group) is reviewed briefly.


Via Kamoun Lab @ TSL
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Petter Françoise's curator insight, October 10, 2013 2:48 AM

many are recommended for regulation by EPPO