Brain Rules
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Music | Brain Rules |

Music | Brain Rules | | Brain Rules | Scoop.it
Brain Rules by John J. Medina is a multimedia project explaining how the brain works. It includes a book, a feature-length documentary film, and a series of interactive tutorials.
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Brain Rule 10 is my favorite by far because my favorite thing in the world is music. Before deciding to become an English Major, I wanted to be a musician. I originally wanted to go into Music Business or Recording as my major. My parents were very supportive, but I did not want to take the risk, so I decided to major in English and focus on music journalism. Somewhere in the 4 years of undergrad, I decided that I did not want to pollute the thing I loved by making it my career.

This chapter of brain rules discusses the impact of musical training on intellectual skills. The chapter specifically points out the different benefits of musical training versus listening to music, noting that musical training has a variety of effects from social cognition to empathy skills. These effects can be witness in people of all ages. The author make sure to point out that research in this area has not proven the connections, party because there is no agreed upon definition of music or an understanding of why music exits. The author points out that the actual results of whether music is associated with increased academic performance is not as concrete or positive as many people believe. There is a very low association between the two areas. However, there are some positive effects of taking music and listening to music. In regards to musicians, the author notes that musicians are better listeners and better at detecting emotion
Music training/lessons boosts language skills, improve social skills, and make kids more empathetic. It is also shown that music impacts mood; “music can induce hormonal changes” (215).  The specific hormones are dopamine, cortisol, and oxytocin. The research presents that there is “a mechanism whereby music makes people happy, calms them down, maybe even makes them feel close to each other” (217). Music has been used as medicine for ages. It has helped head-trauma patients recover speech, improved the recovery rates for stroke victims, and aided those with Parkinson’s and cerebral palsy. Music has also aided prematurely born infants. Researchers are not sure why this happens. The author suggests schools do longitudinal studies about the benefits of music training to academic performance.

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Beautiful Mind: Best Study Music for Concentration and Better Learning - 1 Hour Music

www.meditationrelaxclub.com https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/beautiful-minds-best-study/id392522831 Holidays are over! Let's go Back to School and Back to W...
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Brain Rules

 

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Persuasive eLearning: How to Persuade Learners with Stories, Emotions and More

Persuasive eLearning: How to Persuade Learners with Stories, Emotions and More | Brain Rules | Scoop.it
The secret recipe to a truly persuasive eLearning course is simple, at least in theory. Professionals in the fields of psychology, advertising, marke

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