Artistry and Inspiration
1.5K views | +0 today
Follow
Artistry and Inspiration
Inspiration, Artistry, Awesomeness. For additional Educator Resources and updates, please visit: http://EduResearcher.com
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Creative Explorations
Scoop.it!

Dancers Add Imagination In Unexpected Places

Dancers Add Imagination In Unexpected Places | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

'Dancers Among Us' features surprising, whimsical images of dancers gracefully acting out daily activities.

 

http://www.mnn.com/lifestyle/arts-culture/blogs/dancers-add-imagination-in-unexpected-places


Via Sophie Martin
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Creative Ads Show How Smartphones Are Blocking Real, Human Interactions // By John Yong on DesignTAXI.com

Creative Ads Show How Smartphones Are Blocking Real, Human Interactions // By John Yong on DesignTAXI.com | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

By John Yong
 

"Shanghai-based creative Shiyang He has created several ads that drive a powerful message on our obsession with smartphones and social media platforms. 

The simple ads feature a ‘Phone Wall’ dividing two individuals—blocking off any real form of human interaction. 

At the bottom, the ads state “The more you connect, the less you connect”, reminding us to interact with people in real-life more often." 

For full post, click on title above or here: http://designtaxi.com/news/377337/Clever-Ads-Show-How-Smartphones-Are-Blocking-Real-Human-Interactions/#ixzz3iBZjYoY0

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

One Man's Mission to Ensure Schools Uphold Arts in Education Law // SCPR.org

One Man's Mission to Ensure Schools Uphold Arts in Education Law // SCPR.org | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

By Mary Plummer [Picture caption: Music teacher and former principal Carl Schafer has logged about 1,700 miles during his three-year quest to get arts taught in California's public schools. Mary Plummer/KPCC]


"There’s a little-known law that requires California's public schools to teach dance, theater, visual arts and music. Most school districts ignore it. Carl Schafer is on a mission to change that. 


Schafer has spent the last three years lobbying to get arts instruction to every student in the state.


His journey began a few years back, when Schafer discovered words in California’s education code that mandate arts instruction for 1st through 12th-graders.


"When I first started doing this and bringing it up, there were lots of people in very important positions in education who were not aware," he said. 


Since then, Schafer has made it his personal crusade to ensure the law is enforced. He's had meetings with state Sen. Carol Liu; Rick Pratt, the chief consultant to the state Assembly Committee on Education; and California Congressman Ted Lieu.


Schafer's made some progress. State Sen. Ben Allen is considering calling for an informational hearing to tackle the subject of arts instruction in the education code. The California Arts Council has also agreed to discuss the education code at a September meeting in Santa Cruz.


Schafer thinks all schools can offer arts instruction as mandated by the state.


"I think it’s attainable," he said. "It’s really, I think, a matter of learning how to do it." ...


*** 


"Nationwide, 42 states require the arts be taught from elementary to high school. But in recent years, the recession and an emphasis on standardized testing led to arts funding cuts in many school districts."...


For full post, click on title above or here: 
http://www.scpr.org/news/2015/07/23/53291/man-on-a-mission-works-to-get-california-to-enforc/  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Superhero with Autism Featured in New Comic Book // NBCNews via AutismAtFaceValue

Superhero with Autism Featured in New Comic Book // NBCNews via AutismAtFaceValue | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

"Extraordinary superpowers, high-flying villains and fearless, world-saving heroes are the stuff of countless comic books. But the newest star to hit the comic circuit is different than most.
 

Michael is a comic book character with autism - a hero with a mathematical mind, artistic gift and an abundance of compassion. Face Value Comics says he is the first"...


For full post and video, click on title above or here: http://www.nbcnews.com/feature/making-a-difference/comic-book-stars-worlds-first-hero-autism-n190321


For more, check out Autism At Face Value: http://autismatfacevalue.com  

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

You Are Fearless // NeuraFlow

"What we fear doing most is usually what we most need to do." 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=v6G760BS6eg 

 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

The Known Universe by AMNH

The Known Universe takes viewers from the Himalayas through our atmosphere and the inky black of space to the afterglow of the Big Bang. Every star, planet, ...
more...
Niels Thomassen's curator insight, April 15, 2014 8:27 AM

beatifull scene with the computer technology they used. it looks very interesting and it gives me rest for a moment. 

Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

"Thanks, But No Tanks!": Eighth Grader Convinces Entire School To Skip SeaWorld

"Thanks, But No Tanks!": Eighth Grader Convinces Entire School To Skip SeaWorld | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

"The annual “winterim” trip to San Diego taken by the seventh and eighth graders at Alexander Dawson School in Lafayette, Colo., will be missing one element this year. The students will no longer be visiting SeaWorld, thanks to the efforts of one intrepid eighth grader named Phoebe Goldstein.


Goldstein, a longtime opponent of whale and dolphin captivity, had heard of other schools nearby that took field trips to the marine park. When she heard that her own school was planning a trip, she was shocked — and driven to action."...


For full story, click on title above or here: https://www.thedodo.com/seaworld-field-trip-cancelled-787140546.html 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

"A Man Takes A Single Rake to The Beach..." ViralNova

"A Man Takes A Single Rake to The Beach..." ViralNova | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

..."If you live in San Francisco, California, then you may be lucky enough to come across the art of Andres Amador. He doesn’t paint or sculpt. He prefers a medium that is temporary but absolutely beautiful: a sandy beach at low tide. He uses a rake to create works of art that can be bigger than 100,000 sq. ft."
 

"He spends hours creating these intricate masterpieces, knowing that the tide will soon come in and wash away his work forever.

For Andres, his art is “more about the process and less about the result.”"

For full post, click on title above or here:http://www.viralnova.com/beach-art/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Nosego // Artist

Nosego // Artist | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

Visit main website: 

http://www.nosego.com/


Twitter feed:

https://twitter.com/NOSEGO 


And Facebook page:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/Nosego/500522440611 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Student Performs Breathtaking Tribute to Her Teacher - Maddy Lopez Honoring Art Teacher, Lew Hubbard

Student Performs Breathtaking Tribute to Her Teacher - Maddy Lopez Honoring Art Teacher, Lew Hubbard | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

Full story at: http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kenzo-shibata/student-paints-art-teacher-after-death_b_4467620.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000003

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Woodstock Chimes Presents - Chimes for Autism: Tyler's Story

Tyler is an 8 year old boy living with autism. His family contacted us because he loves Woodstock Chimes and has the gift of amazing musical acuity. See more...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Bestselling Authors Anne Patchett and Daniel Pink Share Their Favorite Books of 2014 // PBSNewsHour

http://video.pbs.org/video/2365394918/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Gallery Owner Says Opioid Art Exhibit Landing at Purdue Pharma Just The Beginning Of Protest Movement // Hartford Courant

Gallery Owner Says Opioid Art Exhibit Landing at Purdue Pharma Just The Beginning Of Protest Movement // Hartford Courant | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

"A Stamford art gallery owner who was arrested on June 22 after unloading an 800-pound steel sculpture of a bent, burnt heroin spoon at the Stamford headquarters of Purdue Pharma said his act of “guerrilla art” is the first in what he plans to be many unauthorized protests against the pharmaceutical industry.

 

The gallery owner, Fernando Luis Alvarez, whose gallery carries his name, is calling his planned campaign the “Spoon Movement.”

 

“That was the whole strategy we created for this. We are going after pharma companies, distributors, politicians and doctors,” said Alvarez. “Every time we go to a new company we will have a new spoon. That spoon will be taken away by the cops and I’ll get arrested and after that they will give it back and we will donate the spoon to a city that is suing the companies.”

 

Alvarez said his act of protest was engineered to draw attention to what he considers Purdue’s leading role in the nationwide opioid epidemic. Purdue is the maker of OxyContin and other opioids. The sculpture was made by Boston artist Domenic Esposito, whose brother’s heroin addiction began as a dependence on OxyContin and Percocet. 

 

Alvarez is due in court on July 10 on one misdemeanor criminal charge of obstructing free passage. After refusing to remove the sculpture, Alvarez was taken away by police. Police originally said Alvarez would also be charged with a felony, but he was not.)

 

The story of Alvarez’s act and his arrest went viral on the Courant’s website. That’s what Alvarez wanted and why he timed the unauthorized art drop to coincide with the opening of his multi-artist exhibit “Opioid: Express Yourself.”

 

“This goes back to the early roots of the gallery, its mission statement. It’s important for us to do this show to look at the problem from a different angle,” Alvarez said. “Artists, through their work, can hold accountable the architects of this epidemic.”

 

Easy access to opioids is one of the great scourges of contemporary society. It fuels the escalating nationwide toll of accidental deaths and has been cited as a major facilitator of the historic rise in suicides.

 

Alvarez blames the drug companies. He especially called out the billionaire Sackler family, majority owners of Purdue. The family’s fortune, earned through Purdue, has been donated to myriad institutions. The Sackler name is widely recognized, stamped on art galleries, museums and universities around the world. Meanwhile, the corporation has been the focus of numerous lawsuits regarding its marketing and labeling of opioids.

 

“There are many players here: the corporation, politicians, doctors, universities, museums. They should all be held accountable,” Alvarez said. “If people feel uncomfortable seeing the Sackler name, they should speak up.”

 

The spoon installed in front of Purdue — an “exhibit” that lasted about two hours until Stamford public works employees hauled off the artwork — is still in police custody. Alvarez said when he gets the sculpture back he will add it to the gallery exhibit, which opened with a bang. After news of his arrest got out, 1,000 people showed up at the gallery for the show’s opening. Openings usually attract 400 people or fewer, he said.

 

Alvarez said the traditional way of punishing pharmaceutical companies — with big fines — isn’t good enough. As a result of a 2007 federal lawsuit targeting the labeling and marketing of OxyContin, Purdue paid a $600 million fine and three top-level executives were convicted of criminal charges.

 

“It’s not a fine that does it. They’re playing the public with that. The big fine is agreed upon behind closed doors by the big boy network. People hear ‘millions, holy crap,’ but these people have made billions. What good is that? We want to send these people behind bars.”

 

Other Artists In ‘Opiod’

Matthew Paul Cleary’s biological parents died as a result of heroin addiction, and he used various drugs as a youth. He was inspired by his mother and father’s tragedy to create his three-piece work, seen in the Stamford exhibit. One piece, Cleary says, depicts a “community of lost spirits” to which his parents belonged. A diptych next to that work shows two skulls covered with a bright, colorful curtain. The third piece is a twisted, stunted tree branch, to symbolize addicts’ children.

Cleary, 45, said the start of his parents’ addictions predated the introduction of OxyContin, but he considers them both “victims of the irresponsible marketing of opioids.”


“OxyContin was introduced at a time when my father was in a methadone program, doing his best to confront his addiction,” Cleary said. “After OxyContin overflowed the market, my father found it very easy to obtain at various local pill mills.”


He added that Arthur Sackler’s success at marketing his products in the 1960s inspired other pharmaceutical companies to follow suit with aggressive marketing campaigns, “which began a brutal cycle of profit over people’s well-being.


“Make no mistake that Purdue Pharma and corporations like them are accountable for unnecessary deaths across this entire country including the death of my parents,” he said.

Clinton Deckert's artwork shows demons rising from a nightmare landscape. It is part of the Stamford exhibit "Opioid: Express Yourself." (Clinton Deckert)

Clinton Deckert of Southington contributed two works, one a black-and-white of demons rising from a nightmare landscape, the other, called “Feeding the Beast,” a malevolent yellow eye staring out from a dark background.

“What is good for society must outweigh the driving forces of greed and profit,” Deckert said. “The medical field, legislature, law enforcement and especially the pharmaceutical companies must work in tandem to resolve this crisis.”
 

Artist Ben Quesnel said the opioid epidemic has taken a toll on his own circle.

“I’ve lost friends to it. I’ve had a couple close friends able to get themselves out of it,” he said. “It’s like #metoo. Everybody knows somebody in this situation.”

 

In response to the epidemic, Quesnel created the found-object piece “Prescribed Ruins,” a wooden structure resembling a wall ripped out of a bathroom, complete with two-by-fours, wall tiling and a medicine cabinet. The configuration of beams mimics Purdue HQ’s modernist architectural design. The medicine cabinet’s mirror reflects the second part of the exhibit: 17,000 clay pieces resembling pills, scattered on the floor of the Alvarez gallery. “I call that part of the piece ‘Take Two,’ like it says on the pill bottle,” he said.

John J. Bedoya’s oil-on-canvas of opium poppies is shredded at the bottom of the canvas, to suggest the ruination caused by the product of the flowers.

Lee Tal made an American flag, painted it black and crossed it out with a bar. Alvarez explained that work:

 

“Americans of the future will look at this era and ask, ‘how the hell did they let this happen?”

 

Other artists whose works are in the show are Antuan Rodriguez, Nathan Lewis and Jason Werner.

 

OPIOID: EXPRESS YOURSELF is at Fernando Luis Alvarez Gallery, 96 Bedford St. in Stamford, until July 30. flalvarezgallery.com.

 

As a protest to the opioid crisis, artist Domenic Esposito and gallerist Fernando Luis Alvarez (speaking) placed a spoon sculpture  in front of the Purdue Pharma building in Stamford early Friday morning." 

 

For full post, see: 

http://www.courant.com/news/connecticut/hc-fea-stamford-opioids-pudue-pharma-spoon-culture-0701-story.html 

more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD from Educational Psychology & Technology
Scoop.it!

The Power of PEAS: Why Physical, Emotional, Academic, and Social Growth Are Key to a Successful Education // Dr. Michael Hynes 

Published on May 5, 2017

Educator, scholar and thought leader Dr. Michael Hynes works as a public school superintendent of schools on Long Island and advocates the importance of a holistic approach to educating children. He emphasizes the importance of play and recess in schools and yoga and mindfulness in the classroom, is a public school advocate and university lecturer, has published numerous articles and been featured on several podcasts on school leadership. Hynes has focused his work on transforming schools by tapping into Potential Based Education, which focuses on the significance of social, emotional, physical and cognitive development for students.

Hynes received his undergraduate degree in psychology from Bethany College and his doctorate in educational administration from Dowling College. He has undergone professional training to integrate organization learning and school leadership into programs at New York University, Stony Brook University and Harvard University. He has been awarded the “Friend of Education Award” and the “Distinguished Leadership Award” by Phi Delta Kappa.

Follow Mike at @MikeHynes5

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S4kXrTK1VMk 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Typewriter Artist // Paul Smith

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=svzPm8lT36o 


KING-TV (2004): An extraordinary man with a severe disability creates incredible works of art using a typewriter. http://www.johnstofflet.com/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Benjamin Zander: The Transformative Power of Classical Music // Video on TED.com

Benjamin Zander has two infectious passions: classical music, and helping us all realize our untapped love for it -- and by extension, our untapped love for all new possibilities, new experiences, new connections.

http://www.ted.com/talks/benjamin_zander_on_music_and_passion.html

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Art Is Power Video Blog #3 // Patrice Mililo Interviews Erin Salazar, Exhibition District, San Jose, CA 

Video on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rq5uEO9kzyg 

 

Blogpost on Art Is Power: http://www.artispower.org/2016/art-power-video-blog-3-power-public-art/ 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

"Quantum Entanglement For the Fifth Grade Classroom" // Powerful Spoken Word By Taylor Gaar

Science teacher, Taylor Gaar, recites original poem 'Quantum Entanglement for the 5th Grade Classroom' at Kinnection Campout 2014 www.kinnectioncampout.org Z...
more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Music for All

Music for All | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

https://www.facebook.com/musicforallnetwork/photos/a.426331743899.219193.7307318899/10151609438013900/?type=1&theater

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Dominique Christina & Denice Frohman - "No Child Left Behind" // Sister Outsider Poetry

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RHSqUyi6GUU 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Atlas Obscura

Atlas Obscura | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

"Atlas Obscura is the definitive guide to the world's wondrous and curious places.


In an age where everything seems to have been explored and there is nothing new to be found, we celebrate a different way of looking at the world. If you're searching for Miniature citiesGlass FlowersBooks Bound In Human SkinGigantic Flaming Holes In The GroundBone ChurcesBalancing Pagodas, or Homes Built Entirey Out of Paper, the Atlas Obscura is where you'll find them.


Atlas Obscura is a collaborative project. We depend on our far-flung community of explorers (like you!) to help us discover amazing, hidden spots, and share them with the world. If you know of a curious place that's not already in the Atlas, let us know.

There is plenty out there to discover, so let's start looking!"


http://www.atlasobscura.com/ 

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

The Little Girl from the 1981 LEGO Ad is All Grown Up, and She’s Got Something to Say

The Little Girl from the 1981 LEGO Ad is All Grown Up, and She’s Got Something to Say | Artistry and Inspiration | Scoop.it

"By Lori Day – In mid-January, this article on The Huffington Post hit my Facebook newsfeed like a Justin Bieber deportation petition—it was everywhere. In it, HuffPost Family News Editor Jessica Samakow writes:


'Pay attention, 2014 Mad Men: This little girl is holding a LEGO set. The LEGOs are not pink or “made for girls.” She isn’t even wearing pink. The copy is about “younger children” who “build for fun.” Not just “girls” who build. ALL KIDS. In an age when little girls and boys are treated as though they are two entirely different species by toy marketers, this 1981 ad for LEGO — one of our favorite images ever — issues an important reminder.'

 

Something about this piece with the iconic 1981 ad tapped the zeitgeist and it became one of HuffPo’s more viral articles in recent memory, receiving over 60,000 shares. And along the way, the small world of Facebook led to a comment thread on my wall where someone, upon seeing the little red-haired girl holding her LEGOs, wrote, “Hey, I know her!” And now I do too, because that’s the serendipity of social media. Her name is Rachel Giordano, she is 37 years old, and she’s a practicing naturopathic doctor in Seattle, Washington. Giordano agreed to talk to me about her childhood and the ad, and to pose for a new Then & Now photo meme, which you see above in the lead image."...

 

For full post, click image above or here: 
http://www.womenyoushouldknow.net/little-girl-1981-lego-ad-grown-shes-got-something-say/

more...
No comment yet.
Scooped by Roxana Marachi, PhD
Scoop.it!

Using Music to Promote Immigrant Rights // Stepping Up: The Band Leader

By Matthew Green 

This video is part of “Stepping Up,” a short video series featuring four impressive young people working for change in their communities and explaining what sparked them to action. Watch all four videos here.

 

For Walter Diaz, the message is in the music. Amid heightened fears of federal immigration crackdowns that rattled undocumented communities after Donald Trump’s unexpected election victory last November, Diaz took action in the most effective way he knew how.

 

Then a senior at Lincoln High School in San Francisco,  the 19-year-old immigrant from El Salvador started a Latino marching band with his classmates.

 

Throughout the school year, Diaz developed the sprawling band, leading it on occasional marches through the long hallways of his school, culminating with performances in the main courtyard. As they played Latin-tinged melodies, band members proudly donned flags of their native countries, held pro-immigrant placards and passed out fliers to fellow classmates about immigration resources and legal rights.

 

They’ve since gone on to march in other San Francisco schools and perform in several community festivals.

 

“We created the band as a club to share with people who are not familiar with our culture, with our music,” said Diaz.  “To create a band was create strength among different nationalities and show that we are all humans.”

 

Diaz fled El Salvador when he was 17 after his family was threatened by a violent gang that his brother had once been involved with. He and his family traveled through Mexico and then tried crossing illegally into the U.S., but were apprehended by immigration officials. Diaz says that because of his tenuous situation, he was able to secure a visa, allowing him to settle in the U.S. as a legal resident.

 

But, he adds, “I am still not at ease since many others don’t have that opportunity.  Many people are being deported. Many families are being separated.”

 

The marching band is Diaz’s unique form of activism, a way to celebrate and shine light on communities that are often relegated to the shadows. He’s since graduated from Lincoln High and gone on to attend community college but returns regularly to help lead the band he started.

 

To find Walter and the three other students in our Stepping Up series, we searched across the Bay Area for a diverse array of young activists representing different cities and different perspectives who had inspiring stories.

 

AND we want to hear from you! Let us know if you have a story to share. Are you a young person who’s passionate about a social or political issue and taken action? Or do you know some who fits that description? Submit your video, audio or written piece to KQED Education’s Fall Youth Media Challenge. Go here for submission guidelines."...

 

For main post, see: 

https://ww2.kqed.org/lowdown/2017/11/15/watch-meet-an-sf-high-school-student-who-started-a-school-latino-marching-band-for-immigrant-rights/ 

 
more...
No comment yet.