Australian Health
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Australian Health
Australian health information sourced from government & research organisations: statistics, policy papers etc.
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Welcome!

Welcome! | Australian Health | Scoop.it

This webpage has been created to provide links to useful resources on the Web relating to Australian Health.  Regularly updated, it includes links to government statistics and reports, and summary papers from a range of Australian health organisations and government agencies.

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Who are Australia's males?

Who are Australia's males? | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Australia's 12 million males (in 2016) experience varying health outcomes across population characteristics like Indigenous status, remoteness, socioeconomic disadvantage and age. Males also experience different, and often poorer, health outcomes than females.
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Burden of cancer in Australia: Australian Burden of Disease Study 2011 (AIHW)

Cancer was the greatest cause of health burden in Australia in 2011, accounting for around one-fifth of the total disease burden. Most (94%) of this burden was due to dying prematurely, with only a small proportion of the burden due to living with a cancer diagnosis. This report explores in further detail the burden of cancer in Australia, including cancer burden in Aboriginal and Torres Strait islander people, and by remoteness and socioeconomic group. It also looks at how the cancer burden has changed since 2003, and the potential burden of cancer expected in 2020.
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Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2011 (AIHW)

Australian Burden of Disease Study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2011 (AIHW) | Australian Health | Scoop.it
This report analyses the impact of nearly 200 diseases and injuries in terms of living with illness (non-fatal burden) and premature death (fatal burden). The study found that chronic diseases such as cancer, cardiovascular diseases, mental and substance use disorders, and musculoskeletal conditions, along with injury contributed the most burden in Australia in 2011. Almost one third of the overall disease burden could be prevented by removing exposure to risk factors such as tobacco use, high body mass, alcohol use, physical inactivity and high blood pressure.
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Food security and health in rural and remote Australia

Food security and health in rural and remote Australia | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Describes and analyses the prevalence of food insecurity in Australia and the consequent adverse implications for the health and productivity of individuals and communities.
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Australia's health 2016 (AIHW)

Australia's health 2016 (AIHW) | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Australia’s health 2016 is the 15th biennial health report of the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. This edition profiles current health issues in a collection of feature articles and statistical snapshots that cover a range of areas, including:
The health status of Australians; Health expenditure; The major causes of ill health; Determinants of health; Health through the life course; Health of Indigenous Australians; Preventing and treating ill health; Health system performance.
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Hospital resources 2014–15: Australian hospital statistics

Hospital resources 2014–15: Australian hospital statistics | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Presents a detailed overview of public and private hospital resources in Australia.
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Nutritional ecology and human health

Nutritional ecology and human health | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Existing models for measuring health impacts of the human diet are limiting our capacity to solve obesity and its related health problems, claim two of the world's leading nutritional scientists in their newest research.
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Review of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people

Review of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people | Australian Health | Scoop.it
The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of the use of illicit drugs among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people in Australia. It provides general information on the context of illicit drug use in Australia and the factors of particular relevance to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including the historical context, social context, and other social factors. This review provides detailed information on the extent of illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including overall self-reported prevalence and prevalence by type of substance. It outlines the health and social and emotional wellbeing harms associated with substance use, as well as the associated hospitalisations, mortality, and wider social impacts. This review also provides information on policies and strategies addressing illicit drug use among Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people, including a number of past policies that provide historical context. This review concludes by describing a number of services that aim to address illicit drug use in Australia, with particular focus on elements of effective service design and delivery and barriers commonly faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people when accessing these services.
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Futility and the law: Knowledge, practice and attitudes of doctors in end of life care

Futility and the law: Knowledge, practice and attitudes of doctors in end of life care | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Explores doctors’ perceptions about the law that governs futile treatment at the end of life, and the role it plays in medical practice.
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Investing in women's mental health: strengthening the foundations for women, families and the Australian economy

Investing in women's mental health: strengthening the foundations for women, families and the Australian economy | Australian Health | Scoop.it
The AHPC policy paper, Investing in women’s mental health, strengthening the foundations for women, families and the Australian economy, discusses the extensive evidence that women’s mental health needs are significantly different from those of men. Certain mental illnesses are more prevalent in women, they use mental health services more frequently than men, and they want a broader range of treatment options than are currently available.
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All cancers (AIHW)

All cancers (AIHW) | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Cancer is a diverse group of several hundred diseases in which some of the body’s cells become abnormal and begin to multiply out of control. The abnormal cells can invade and damage the tissue around them, and spread to other parts of the body, causing further damage and eventually death.

All cancers combined incorporates ICD-10 cancer codes C00–C97 (Malignant neoplasms of specific sites), D45 (Polycythaemia), D46 (Myelodysplastic syndromes), and D47.1, D47.3, D47.4 and D47.5 (Myeloproliferative diseases); but excludes basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. BCC and SCC, the most common skin cancers, are not notifiable diseases in Australia and are not reported in the Australian Cancer Database.
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Report compares loneliness to obesity, smoking

Report compares loneliness to obesity, smoking | Australian Health | Scoop.it
ABC Radio's Tom Nightingale interviews Sally Stabback, retirement village resident, and Brett Moreton, Council of the Ageing spokesman, about social isolation issues for elderly Victorians.
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Web update: Health risk factors in 2014–15 - Web update - Overview | MyHealthyCommunities

Health risk factors are attributes, characteristics or exposures that increase the likelihood of a person developing a disease or health disorder. Examples of health risk factors include risky alcohol consumption, physical inactivity and high blood pressure. High-quality information on health risk factors is important in providing an evidence base to inform health policy, program and service delivery.
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Who are Australia's females?

Who are Australia's females? | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Australia's 12 million females (in 2016) experience varying health outcomes across population characteristics like Indigenous status, remoteness, socioeconomic disadvantage and age. Females also experience different health outcomes than males.
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Vaccination: perspectives of Australian parents

Vaccination: perspectives of Australian parents | Australian Health | Scoop.it
The latest Australian Child Health Poll has revealed a worrying pattern of practice in Australian health care, where some unvaccinated children are being refused care by health care providers.
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Supporting young people leaving out-of-home care

Supporting young people leaving out-of-home care | Australian Health | Scoop.it
The transition from adolescence to adulthood—emerging adulthood—is now recognised as a significant stage in the life cycle in developmental, emotional and social terms. Young people leaving out-of-home care (OOHC) face this transition to adulthood without family support and with significant extra barriers such as poor mental health, intellectual and physical disabilities, and developmental delays. They are further disadvantaged through structural impediments and economic and social policy factors, such as the lack of affordable or appropriate housing and high unemployment.

Despite state and national government commitment to better support young people leaving care, evidence suggests there are continuing shortfalls in policy and legislation. This paper examines international and Australian literature to identify the key areas of support that may help young people to successfully transition from care. Children and young people in OOHC are one of the most vulnerable, disadvantaged and traumatised populations in the Australian community.
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AIHW Access no. 40, 2016 (AIHW)

AIHW Access no. 40, 2016 (AIHW) | Australian Health | Scoop.it

Publication table of contents

-From the Director
-Board Chair welcomes new AIHW Director
-NHPA functions have moved to the AIHW—an exciting future for local level health reporting
-Australia's health 2016—We're a mostly healthy bunch, but we have room to improve
-A sophisticated analysis of Australia's disease burden
-Health spending linked with both population factors and wealth growth
-First-of-its-kind report provides a clearer picture of homelessness and family violence
-New opportunities: MBS and PBS data now at AIHW
-Risk factors and chronic disease: reduce one, avoid many
-Back to the source: returning data to Indigenous communities
-Children in out-of-home care: their perspectives
-Powerful insights from linked data
-Social media at the AIHW
-New releases

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Systems approaches for chronic disease prevention: sound logic and empirical evidence, but is this view shared outside of academia?

Systems approaches for chronic disease prevention: sound logic and empirical evidence, but is this view shared outside of academia? | Australian Health | Scoop.it
There is a need and desire to improve chronic disease prevention efforts across Australia. Increasingly, scientists are urging the use of systems thinking and its methods to significantly shift the way we think about, and intervene in, chronic diseases.

This research aimed to examine the convergence between the systems science literature and the views of those working in and advocating for prevention, in relation to the value of systems thinking and its methods for the prevention of chronic diseases.
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Australian burden of disease study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2011—summary report

Australian burden of disease study: impact and causes of illness and death in Australia 2011—summary report | Australian Health | Scoop.it
This summary report provides estimates of the burden due to different diseases and injuries in Australia and the contribution of various risk factors to this burden.
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Inquiry into end of life choices: final report

Inquiry into end of life choices: final report | Australian Health | Scoop.it
On 7 May 2015 the Legislative Council agreed to the following motion:

That pursuant to Sessional Order 6 this House requires the Legal and Social Issues Committee to inquire into, consider and report, no later than 31 May 2016, on the need for laws in Victoria to allow citizens to make informed decisions regarding their own end of life choices and, in particular, the Committee should —

assess the practices currently being utilised within the medical community to assist a person to exercise their preferences for the way they want to manage their end of life, including the role of palliative care;

review the current framework of legislation, proposed legislation and other relevant reports and materials in other Australian states and territories and overseas jurisdictions; and

consider what type of legislative change may be required, including an examination of any federal laws that may impact such legislation
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Medicinal cannabis in Australia: the missing links

Medicinal cannabis in Australia: the missing links | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Cultivation of cannabis for medicinal or scientific purposes needs considered management before it is rolled out as a therapeutic good.

Since the publication in the Journal last year of a perspective on cannabis that stated: “Australia is behind the times on the medicinal use of cannabis”, there appears to have been a palpable change in community attitudes around cannabis as medicine. This has occurred alongside anecdotal reports from people with intractable illnesses who have had symptomatic benefit with cannabis. Palliative care specialists have acknowledged a potential role for medicinal cannabis in their specialty. Internationally, the scene is also changing. For example, the Netherlands Office of Medicinal Cannabis enables dispensation through pharmacies after purchase from a contracted company, which also exports to other European countries. In the United States, 23 states and Washington, DC, have legalised marijuana in some form, mostly for medicinal purposes, since June 2015.
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Mesothelioma in Australia: cresting the third wave

Mesothelioma in Australia: cresting the third wave | Australian Health | Scoop.it
There has been much recent commentary about the ‘third wave’ of asbestos-related disease, arising particularly from exposures of people repairing, renovating or demolishing buildings that contain asbestos. The presence and extent of a third wave, however, are difficult to assess, and the extent and risk of both occupational and non-occupational third-wave exposures are largely unmeasured. Moreover, we lack information on the extent of deterioration of in situ asbestos, and its significance for ambient and third-wave exposures.
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Cervical screening in Australia 2013–2014 (AIHW)

Cervical screening in Australia 2013–2014 (AIHW) | Australian Health | Scoop.it
Cervical screening in Australia 2013–2014 presents the latest national statistics monitoring the National Cervical Screening Program, which aims to reduce incidence, morbidity and mortality from cervical cancer. Around 57% of women in the target age group of 20–69 took part in the program, with more than 3.8 million women screening in 2013 and 2014. Cervical cancer incidence for women of all ages remains at an historical low of 7 new cases per 100,000 women, and deaths are also low, historically and by international standards, at 2 deaths per 100,000 women.
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Chronic disease risk factors (AIHW)

Chronic disease risk factors (AIHW) | Australian Health | Scoop.it
The term chronic disease applies to a group of diseases that tend to be long lasting and have persistent effects. This is opposed to acute diseases, which have a quick onset and are often brief, intense and/or severe.

Many factors influence how healthy we are. Some of these function on an individual level, for example, health behaviours or genetic make-up, while others function at a broader societal level, such as the availability of health services, vaccination programs or a clean and healthy environment. All these influencing factors are known collectively as determinants of health.
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Assessing gambling-related harm

Assessing gambling-related harm | Australian Health | Scoop.it
This study explored gambling-related harm in Victoria, using a burden of disease approach.
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