Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think
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Flipping Bloom's Taxonomy

Flipping Bloom's Taxonomy | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it

I think the revised Bloom’s Taxonomy is wrong. I agree that the taxonomy accurately classifies various types of cognitive thinking skills. It certainly identifies the different levels of complexity.

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Love this!

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Teaching Kids to Struggle #GrowthMindset

Teaching Kids to Struggle #GrowthMindset | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
How do you teach a Growth Mindset? By letting students struggle and share. This activity has been used by thousands of educators to teach Growth Mindset.

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Lon Woodbury's curator insight, September 28, 2017 4:45 PM

Interesting technique for classroom exercise in helping develop a "growth" mindset.  -Lon

Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, October 16, 2017 6:55 AM
In tijden waarin mensen aandringen om kinderen te catalogeren volgens IQ, breek ik graag een lans voor een groei-benadering. (growth mindset). 
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A List Of 50+ Teaching Strategies To Jumpstart Your Teacher Brain

A List Of 50+ Teaching Strategies To Jumpstart Your Teacher Brain | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
In addition to literacy strategies, approaches to assessment, and grouping strategies (among many others), knowing the right teaching strategy for the right academic situation may not be a matter of expertise or training, but memory: out of sight, out of mind, yes?

Which makes the following infographic from fortheteachers.org useful.

While it doesn’t offer definitions and explanations for each strategy (it’s an infographic, not a book), and many great strategies are missing (e.g., 3-2-1, exit slip, project-based learning, accountable talk, ask a question, etc.) it does work well as a kind of reminder for what’s possible, even offering categories for each strategy, from progress monitoring (think-pair-share, KWL charts), to Note-Taking (graphic organizers).

There are 87 instructional strategies listed below, but several are repeated across categories, so let’s call it “50+” strategies.

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Runshaw TS's curator insight, September 29, 2017 5:18 AM
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9 Ways to Inspire Student Inventors - Vicki Davis @CoolCatTeacher @Edutopia

9 Ways to Inspire Student Inventors - Vicki Davis @CoolCatTeacher @Edutopia | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it

"There’s an old saying that the things that change your life are the books you read, the places you go, and the people you meet. But I’d like to add a fourth: the challenges you face (and how you face them) will always change your life. If we want our students to respond to challenges with creativity and inventiveness, we must create the conditions in which innovation is not only possible but encouraged. You don’t help students learn to invent by giving worksheets or cookie-cutter assignments. In fact, these one-size-fits-all approaches may actually take up the time that could be used for such creativity.

According to the Torrance Test—which measures CQ, or creativity quotient—the United States has been declining in creativity since 1990. There has to be a reason.

Perhaps it is because we focus on students’ weaknesses instead of their strengths. In many schools, we’ll put a math genius who struggles with grammar into extra English classes. Should we not give this math genius access to college-level advanced math work, and figure out the basic English requirements he or she needs for a basic understanding of grammar? Why do we think that all students should be good at everything?

We can either be average at everything or exceptional at something. With this in mind, here are some things we need to do to encourage student inventors as we nurture student passions, interests, and strengths."


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From Visible Thinking Routines to 5 Modern Learning Routines - Langwitches

From Visible Thinking Routines to 5 Modern Learning Routines - Langwitches | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
I have been a fan of Visible Thinking Routines which were developed by Project Zero from Havard, for a while now. I have used these routines with students, as  blogging routines and in professional development workshops.

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Calliope Global Fran's curator insight, July 31, 2015 2:42 PM
I have been a fan of Visible Thinking Routines which were developed by Project Zero from Havard, for a while now. I have used these routines with students, as  blogging routines and in professional development workshops.

 

Learn more:

 

https://gustmees.wordpress.com/2015/07/19/learning-path-for-professional-21st-century-learning-by-ict-practice/

 

Shelly Reckow VanVoorst's curator insight, October 25, 2015 3:45 PM

I scooped these visible thinking routines because they reminded me of class, and the expectations of how we will utilize information.  I hope that when other educators and teachers look at these visuals they not only share them with their students, but also consistently reference them, and demonstrate how to work through the routines themselves. 

Nigerian Institute of Chartered Arbitrators's curator insight, January 7, 2017 4:57 AM

From Visible Thinking Routines to 5 Modern Learning Routines - Langwitches

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A Detailed List of 9 Self Assessment Questions for a Growth Mindset

A Detailed List of 9 Self Assessment Questions for a Growth Mindset | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Here are some great self assessment questions that are based on an infographic that features a list of growth mindset principles.
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Strong connections here to the critical and creative thinking capability.

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Three Tools for Teaching Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills

Three Tools for Teaching Critical Thinking and Problem Solving Skills | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Teaching students how to make inferences and see positive sides of even terrible ideas can help them develop critical thinking skills.
Marianne's insight:

This article contains some very practical  and easy to implement ideas.

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The Critical 21st Century Skills Every Student Needs and Why

The Critical 21st Century Skills Every Student Needs and Why | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
This is a re-share of one of our most popular articles on the 21st century skills students need for life beyond the classroom, and why they are important.
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Strong links to our Australian Curriculum capabilities - they exist for a reason!

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8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning - TeachThought

8 Reflective Questions To Help Any Student Think About Their Learning - TeachThought | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Why the brain actually benefits from reflection is a matter of neurology, but the extensive research is clear: Prediction, reflection, and metacognition are pillars for the thoughtful classroom. The questions below were created to be, as much as possible, useful with most students at most ages and grade levels with a little rewording.

Perhaps most crucially, by shifting their reflection from content to thought, students have the chance to put themselves back at the center of the learning process. When they reflect, students reimagine what happened in both 1st and 3rd person–as they were seen, and as they saw through their own eyes. How? A sample response for a 7th or 8th grader might be:

I guess I was most creative today when we were given a chance to create our own metaphors for the ways rain forests help the planet “breathe.” Why? Maybe because it forced me to think about something visually, which meant we could come up with our own answers! 

In reflecting, the student had to think both about their own feelings (when they felt something), and how they might be perceived (what others might consider ‘creative’).

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Dr. Helen Teague's curator insight, September 24, 2016 8:14 AM
great scoop on the importance and power of reflection
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How Self-Directed Learning Can Benefit Every Student

How Self-Directed Learning Can Benefit Every Student | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it

Students teaching themselves? Who ever heard of this? Is this even possible? What exactly do we mean by self-directed learning, anyway? I love the following definition from Blake Boles.


What it isn’t:


“isolated, unstructured, or unchallenging learning.”


“classrooms and teachers as the root of all evil.”


What it is:


“purposefully choosing what and how you’ll learn.”


“an understanding and embrace of your personal learning style.”


“all types of learning—including highly structured learning—are valid when you consciously choose them.”



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David W. Deeds's curator insight, August 15, 2016 6:41 PM

Good stuff! Thanks to Juan Doming.

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27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students

27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
27 Ways To Inspire Innovative Thinking In Students
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100 Questions That Help Students Think About Thinking - TeachThought

100 Questions That Help Students Think About Thinking - TeachThought | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
100 Questions That Help Students Think About Thinking by Terry Heick Last year I wrote a post on how to help students think for themselves

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krishn store's curator insight, April 12, 2016 10:20 PM
view Krishna store online India http://krishnstore.com
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When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges

When Kids Have Structure for Thinking, Better Learning Emerges | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
By identifying thinking routines for students, teachers can help deepen metacognitive skills that are applicable to all areas of life.
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Some Practical Tips to Help You Differentiate Your Teaching Strategies

Some Practical Tips to Help You Differentiate Your Teaching Strategies | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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48 Critical Thinking Questions For Any Content Area -

48 Critical Thinking Questions For Any Content Area - | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Critical thinking is the heart and soul of learning, and–in our estimation anyway–ultimately more important to than any one specific content area or subject matter.

It’s also an over-used and rather nebulous phrase — how do you teach someone to think? Of course that’s the purpose of education, but how do you effectively optimize that concept into lasting knowledge and the ability to apply it broadly?

This question is what inspires the creation of seemingly endless learning taxonomies and teaching methods: our desire to pin down a clear definition of what it means to think critically and how to introduce that skill in the classroom. This makes critical thinking questions–well, critical.

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Andres Gomez's curator insight, September 21, 2017 11:46 AM
To develop critical thinking is one of the most complex task to do for teacher in terms of education. Taking into account the history of education in Colombia it is on the principals factor that we as teachers should try to improve in our students in a view of the fact that the Colombia education model do not permit involve our students in whole process to be thinkers, but the principal difficult is, How to do it?
Koen Mattheeuws's curator insight, September 22, 2017 2:43 AM
Om over na te denken...
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Bringing Inquiry-Based Learning Into Your Class

Bringing Inquiry-Based Learning Into Your Class | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
A four-step approach to using a powerful model that increases student agency in learning.
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Should School Be More Confusing?

What if we have it all wrong when it comes to confusion and learning?
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An Awesome Infographic on Bloom's Digital Taxonomy

An Awesome Infographic on Bloom's Digital Taxonomy | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Free resource of educational web tools, 21st century skills, tips and tutorials on how teachers and students integrate technology into education

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OFFREDI Didier's curator insight, December 1, 2016 6:18 AM

An Awesome Infographic on Bloom's Digital Taxonomy via @MarkEDeschaine http://sco.lt/...

Kim Flintoff's comment, December 2, 2016 6:33 PM
This model is too simplistic - it really needs some HOTS applied to it - along these lines: https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/94/ac/42/94ac420bab0bd20900e8c34d6d8289ae.png
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10 ways to make learning meaningful… @whatedsaid

10 ways to make learning meaningful… @whatedsaid | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Whether your students are completing assignments, inquiring into areas of their interest, covering curriculum or exploring their passions, to what extent does it feel (to you, as much as to them) as if they are simply complying and ‘doing school’?

How can we extend learning ‘beyond the project’ and ensure it’s a powerful learning experience, rather than a task for school? (Hint: the answer does not lie in assessment criteria, rubrics or grades.)

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22 Powerful Closure Activities

22 Powerful Closure Activities | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Closure ends a lesson and creates a lasting impression, so make it fun. Students will better retain information reinforced with music, movement, art, or play.
Marianne's insight:

Some useful ones here that will invite rich thinking...

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How Clear Expectations Can Inhibit Genuine Thinking in Students

How Clear Expectations Can Inhibit Genuine Thinking in Students | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Outlining exactly what students need to know to get a good grade can get in the way of genuine learning.
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Love the five belief sets that can either invite thinking or inhibit it...

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TfEL Think Cards

Learning Design Tab

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These Think Cards are great quick ways to build thinking skills

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10+ Terrific Resources for Teaching Questioning Skills to Your Students

10+ Terrific Resources for Teaching Questioning Skills to Your Students | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
A list of useful resources to help you develop questioning skills in your students in fun and challenging ways.
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Student Engagement: Is It Authentic or Compliant?

Student Engagement: Is It Authentic or Compliant? | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Student engagement is extremely important in our classrooms, but too often the engagement is compliant rather than authentic.
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Adding Depth to the Classroom

Adding Depth to the Classroom | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
San Diego’s High Tech High network practices “deeper learning,” an educational approach with a growing following. Advocates say deeper learning improves equity in and outside the classroom. Using students’ experiences and backgrounds as a springboard, the system engages kids—particularly those who fall through the cracks in traditional schools—and prepares them for success after graduation.

Deeper learning seeks to cultivate the critical-thinking skills and creativity demanded in the real world. Companies like Google have declared test scores “worthless.” Leading colleges and universities, too, are on track to replace standard applications with portfolios that give a fuller picture of a student’s achievements in high school. They are looking for candidates who have more to offer than textbook knowledge.

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Nurturing Growth Mindsets: Six Tips From Carol Dweck

Nurturing Growth Mindsets: Six Tips From Carol Dweck | Australian Curriculum:Teaching Kids How to Think | Scoop.it
Stanford researcher Carol Dweck clearly tapped into a powerful and compelling idea when she linked the concept of growth mindsets to academic success.

As fans of Dweck's research can quickly explain, people with fixed mindsets see strengths and skills as inate traits, like eye color. You're either born with them, or you're not. But people with growth mindsets recognize that the brain can grow and change through effort, and they embrace failures as opportunities for developing new strategies and approaches to learning content and concepts they find challenging.

Enthusiasm for Dweck's work has spread rapidly, and her name is a buzzword in many schools as teachers buy into the idea that helping students shift their mindsets can lead to academic gains.

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emma's curator insight, March 16, 2016 12:54 PM
Some very practical tips on implementing growth mindset, it's not a silver bullet but it is pure gold...