Attraction
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Physical Attraction

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Ashlyn Leffel's insight:

This video explains that physical attractions varies between different cultures, but there are similarities like prominent cheek bones, full lips, and symmetry across the face for an attractive woman.  The narrator of the video also talks about "averageness of facial attractiveness".  The video seems very reasonable as it correlates with a study done by researchers. This same concept applies in the journal article and study that was published in 2013.  In this study they discuss that the average face among the population is normally considered as the most attractive and the outliers that differ from the average face in the population are deemed "unattractive" (Trujillo, Jankowitsch, & Langlois, 2013).  This is exactly what the narrator is talking about in this video about the averageness of faces.  They took 32 faces and mashed them together and when comparing that with other mashed faces of less amounts, you can see that the face composed of 32 other faces is the most attractive.  Now in diversity terms, we know that there are differences in what cultures deem attractive and unattractive such as skin tone and body type, but this concept of averageness occurs worldwide (Myers, 2014).  Instead of wanting to look different from the rest of the population, I guess you really want to look more alike the rest of society in terms of facial attractiveness. 

 

References:

 

Myers. (2014). Exploring Psychology. New York: Worth Publishers.


Trujillo, L. T., Jankowitsch, J. M., & Langlois, J. H. (2013). Beauty is in the ease of the beholding: A neurophysiological test of the averageness theory of facial attractiveness. Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience , 1061-1076.

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Politically hot or not? Voters see attraction through 'party-colored glasses' - Today.com

Politically hot or not? Voters see attraction through 'party-colored glasses' - Today.com | Attraction | Scoop.it
Did you get a little swoony when President Barack Obama hit the beach with his shirt off? Or long to run your fingers through Mitt...
Ashlyn Leffel's insight:

In this post, the author discusses how our political party affiliation influences our decision to vote and how attractive we believe people are.  Especially when talking about candidates running for U.S. government, they say that we seem to believe that the candidate that is associated with our political standing is more attractive, whether they are or not. This information is credible because it correlates with a study done that say political party standing and how we vote are related.  Through 3 experiments, they tested this idea and found that they are indeed related and our political belief and affiliations can influence who we see as physically attractive and can influence who we vote for (Riggle, Ottati, Wyer, Kuklinski, & Schwarz, 1992). Also, in an article by Wendy Patrick, on Psychology Today's website, she puts in her views that appearance really can skew the votes for elections(Patrick, 2014).  She talks about in a study done in Canada, that a candidate who is deemed more attractive received two and a half more votes because of this(Patrick, 2014).  Looking at different political groups, democratic and republican, we can see that maybe this is true that we create our personal bias partially based on our political standing.


References:

 


Patrick, W. (2014, November 1). Why Bad Looks Good. Retrieved November 18, 2014, from Psychology Today: http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/why-bad-looks-good/201411/the-optics-politics-appearances-are-not-always-reality

 


Riggle, E. D., Ottati, V. C., Wyer, R. S., Kuklinski, J., & Schwarz, N. (1992). Bases of political judgments: The role of stereotypic and nonstereotypic information.. Political Behavior , 67-87.


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The Scent of Attraction: How Smelling Good Can Improve How People Perceive Your Physical Attractiveness | MUIPR Blog

The Scent of Attraction: How Smelling Good Can Improve How People Perceive Your Physical Attractiveness | MUIPR Blog | Attraction | Scoop.it
The Scent of Attraction: Smelling Good Can Improve How People Perceive Your Physical Attractiveness http://t.co/8hj2MoqBCw
Ashlyn Leffel's insight:

Tamara Rahoumi, who reports on many topics for Muipr, explains that scents, like perfume and cologne or even someone's natural body smell,  play a big role in physical attraction and how we perceive someone's attractiveness.  Her statements seem reasonable because she explained the studies that were conducted to show that there is a relationship between scents and how we perceive physical attractiveness.  This idea is not only for women but also for men, as women seek specific smells that are pleasing to the individual. (Rahoumi, 2014).

Physical attraction and judgments associated with this are always happening in daily life and affect our behavior as well(Reyes, 2014). Knowing this information may cause more people to buy the best smelling scents to try and become more "physical attractive".  In Elizabeth Svoboda's article on Psychology today she also addresses this topic  and how scents play a role in attractiveness(Svoboda, 2008).  She included a personal experience with her and her husband of how he has his own "scent" to him that she loves (Svoboda, 2008).  She says "Some researchers think scent could be the hidden cosmological constant in the sexual universe, the missing factor that explains who we end up with" (Svoboda, 2008). This is an interesting topic to think about when you take in all the times you might have sprayed cologne or perfume on and you might just think twice next time.  

 

References:


Elizabeth Svoboda, p. o. (2008, January 1). Scents and Sensibility. Retrieved November 17, 2014, from Psychology Today: http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/200712/scents-and-sensibility


Muñoz-Reyes, J. A., Pita, M., Arjona, M., Sanchez-Pages, S., & Turiegano, E. (2014). Who is the fairest of them all? The independent effect of attractive features and self-perceived attractiveness on cooperation among women. Evolution and Human Behavior , 118-125.

 

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The rules of attraction - Duke Chronicle

The rules of attraction - Duke Chronicle | Attraction | Scoop.it
A long discussion in the common room about what parts of the male and female bodies are most attractive led me to start thinking about why any parts of our bodies are attractive at all.
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In this column Max Tabet discusses what today as a society, we deem as physically attractive on male and female bodies.  Attractive female body parts were pretty straight forward, as you can guess, but one you might not guess was that facial features play and important part in determining attractiveness.  In Myers text, he discusses that symmetry is important as a worldwide standard for facial features when looking at attractiveness (Myers, 2014). Also, in a study published in 2013, they had participants rate varying attractiveness just on faces of others and they found that the most attractive faces are among the average of the population.  If they fall out of this average, they are considered "unattractive"(Trujillo, Jankowitsch, & Langlois, 2013).  The information from this column comes from his own data and is not based on research so there is not much to back up when looking at the credible side of things.  Diversity has been addressed in this between cultural aspects as there are different standards of physical attractiveness throughout different cultures(Myers, 2014).  This article is interesting to read about when thinking about physical and facial characteristics that we deem as "the most attractive" in our books today.

 

References:

 

 Myers. (2014). Exploring Psychology. New York: Worth Publishers.


Trujillo, L. T., Jankowitsch, J. M., & Langlois, J. H. (2013). Beauty is in the ease of the beholding: A neurophysiological test of the averageness theory of facial attractiveness. Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience , 1061-1076.

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How Politics Influence Physical Attraction

Physical attraction is influenced by many things, and not all of them have to do with looks. In fact, your politics have a bigger impact on your love life th...
Ashlyn Leffel's insight:

In this video, Lisa talks about how political parties influence how we view attractiveness.  For example, if you were part of the democrat party, you might be more likely to be attracted to Obama because of your personal bias.  This information seems very reasonable because it correlates with a study done to show that these two concepts, political affiliation and voting based on physical attractiveness, relate to each other and have some type of correlation (Riggle, Ottati, Wyer, Kuklinski, & Schwarz, 1992).  In the study they found that physical attractiveness did affect judgments and political party played a role in this (Riggle, Ottati, Wyer, Kuklinski, & Schwarz, 1992).  Something new that is not introduced in this video is that when a candidate's issues were presented, the political party and physical attractiveness did not hold up as they based the opinions on the issues the candidate was addressing (Riggle, Ottati, Wyer, Kuklinski, & Schwarz, 1992).  This can be applied to different groups of people based on if they are democratic or republican because hearing this news may influence how they think about their political decisions and they might push their own personal biases out of the way because often times we let our feelings and emotions take over our judgment of physical attractiveness (Myers, 2014).  So next time, think about why you're voting the way you are, or why you really think someone is attractive.

 

References:

 

Myers. (2014). Exploring Psychology. New York: Worth Publishers.


Riggle, E. D., Ottati, V. C., Wyer, R. S., Kuklinski, J., & Schwarz, N. (1992). Bases of political judgments: The role of stereotypic and nonstereotypic information.. Political Behavior , 67-87.

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Looks vs. personality: Speed dating with a twist - HLNtv.com

Looks vs. personality: Speed dating with a twist - HLNtv.com | Attraction | Scoop.it
It’s the age-old question: What’s more important in a relationship, attraction or chemistry? In a world of dating apps, it seems today’s love seekers are skewed solely towards physical attraction.
Ashlyn Leffel's insight:

In this article, Aquillano talks about something new that happened at in a speed dating night.  Instead of seeing their face first, you get to read a "quirky fact" that is posted on a brown paper sack that is over their head.  The point of this is to get to personality before physical characteristics.  In a study done by Logan Trujillo, Jessica Jankowitsch and Judith Langlois,  they explain that when we see someone and judge their physical and facial attractiveness, we can behave, talk, and act differently (Trujillo, Jankowitsch & Langlois, 2013).  In line with this study, Myers explains that our feelings and emotions can affect our attractiveness judgments (Myers, 2014).  Diversity plays a huge part in this as men are more likely to judge women on facial characteristics when women are looking for more inner-features like personality (Trujillo, Jankowitsch & Langlois, 2013). This way of "speed dating" seems like it is a reasonable way to meet new people without letting your own judgments and biases get in the way. 

 

References:

 

 Myers. (2014). Exploring Psychology. New York: Worth Publishers.


Trujillo, L. T., Jankowitsch, J. M., & Langlois, J. H. (2013). Beauty is in the ease of the beholding: A neurophysiological test of the averageness theory of facial attractiveness. Cognitive, Affective & Behavioral Neuroscience , 1061-1076.

 

 

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