Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder
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Addiction and ADHD Adults

Addiction and ADHD Adults | Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder | Scoop.it
Why ADHD adults who seek treatment are much less likely to abuse drugs and alcohol
Mychael Allen's insight:

     The fact that those with ADHD are less likely to abuse drugs and alcohol is very interesting because it is a fairly common belief that those people are in more likely to abuse drugs and alcohol. In fact, people who are affected by ADHD are also affected by conduct disorder (NIMH, 2014), which is marked by the tendencies to enage in illegal or harmful behavior, including the use and abuse of illegal drugs and alcohol (NIMH, 2014). However, when ADHD is treated, conduct disorder decreases, and the likelihood of substance abuse is decreased, which has been proven across multiple studies (Fredriksen, Halmøy, Faraone & Haavik, 2013). When ADHD is left untreated, it is found that substance abuse increased, and is much more likely to become a serious problem (Fredriksen, Halmøy, Faraone & Haavik, 2013). Due to the literature review nature of the Fredriksen study (2013), these findings can be fairly universally applied to those Americans who have ADHD, making it a fairly diverse study. Altogether, this piece of information can be seen as a reliable piece of information.

 

References

 

Fredriksen, M., Halmøy, A., Faraone, S. V., & Haavik, J. (2013). Long-term efficacy and safety of treatment with stimulants and atomoxetine in adult ADHD: A review of controlled and naturalistic studies. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 23(6), 508-527. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2012.07.016.

 

National Institute of Mental Health. (2014). Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml

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Vitamin N Deficiency Linked To ADHD

Vitamin N Deficiency Linked To ADHD | Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder | Scoop.it
Approximately 11 percent of children ages 4 to 17 have been diagnosed with ADHD. Different approaches are needed to support healthy outcomes in this ever-growing population. Nature, or what in recent years has been referred to as vitamin N, may be on...
Mychael Allen's insight:

     It's interesting to use nature, or Vitamin N as they call it, as a treatment for ADHD. While it is true that many experts say they ADHD is worsened by forcing children to sit for long periods of time, as in traditional school (Meyers. 2014),  but its effectiveness when used without any other form of treatment could be up to debate. Studies have proven that treating ADHD with some sort of medication, typically a stimulant, is significantly more effective than non-treatment with a placebo (Fredriksen, Halmøy, Faraone & Haavik, 2013), so one might assume that simply treating ADHD with exposure to nature may not be as effective if the two were used together, or in combination with behaviorial therapy, which also a fairly common treatment option (Meyers, 2014). Another interesting point is that this article specifically mentions that it applies to people regardless of their age, gender, income level, geographical location or even their diagnosis, meaning that, in theory, increasing outdoor activity will increase attentiveness and decrease impulsiveness and hyperactivity in neurotypical people (those without a psychological disorder (Meyers, 2014)) and those with ADHD, making this a very diverse study.

 

References

 

Fredriksen, M., Halmøy, A., Faraone, S. V., & Haavik, J. (2013). Long-term efficacy and safety of treatment with stimulants and atomoxetine in adult ADHD: A review of controlled and naturalistic studies. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 23(6), 508-527. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2012.07.016

 

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With updates on DSM-5. New York: Worth.

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BrainCore of Greater Boston: ADHD Medications and Their Side Effects

BrainCore of Greater Boston: ADHD Medications and Their Side Effects Dianne Kosto, BCN-T of BrainCore Greater Boston discusses common ADHD medications and th...
Mychael Allen's insight:

      The immediate reaction one might have after watching this video is that the title is very misleading, seeing as how the video only briefly covers ADHD medications and their general side effects as a category, but instead predominately covers neuro-feedback, which is a type therapy practiced by this woman. While there are many people with ADHD for whom stimulant medications are ineffective (Fredriksen, Halmøy, Faraone & Haavik, 2013),  to say that they are less effective than just therapy is misinformed.. Therapy, along with medication, has typically found the best results for those with ADHD (Meyers, 2014) (NIMH, 2014). Another source of complication in this video is the relatively small sample size they use in neuro-feedback, as she says they only treat a very small portion of people with ADHD, and in a relatively small geographical area. Also, there could be some sort of ethical compromise in her treating her own son, and the fact that she didn't believe in ADHD as an actual diagnosis before she came across this type of therapy. The combination of her biased opinion, exclusion of proven, viable options such as non-stimulant medication (NIMH, 2014), and non-diverse study population could lead one to believe that this is not a very reliable source. 

 

References

 

Fredriksen, M., Halmøy, A., Faraone, S. V., & Haavik, J. (2013). Long-term efficacy and safety of treatment with stimulants and atomoxetine in adult ADHD: A review of controlled and naturalistic studies. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 23(6), 508-527. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2012.07.016

 

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With updates on DSM-5. New York: Worth.

 

National Institute of Mental Health. (2014). Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml

 

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Treating ADHD with anti-depressants - WDSU New Orleans

Treating ADHD with anti-depressants - WDSU New Orleans | Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder | Scoop.it
WDSU medical editor Dr. Corey Hebert talks about an alternative treatment for Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder in this weekend's house call.
Mychael Allen's insight:

     The use of anti-depressants as an ADHD treatment is an interesting, yet effective choice when one thinks about the factor that dopamine the plays in both ADHD and depression. ADHD is thought to be caused by an imbalance of dopamine in the brain, along with other possible brain abnormalities (Meyers, 2014), as mentioned in the video, and while stimulants, which most ADHD medications are (NIMH, 2014), help treat ADHD symptoms by balancing the dopamine. Anti-depressants can also help balance dopamine in the brains of those with ADHD, helping manage their symptoms. Anti-depressants could work as an effective alternative to stimulants for those who do not react well to stimulants, which which is anywhere from 20% to 60% of adults with ADHD (Fredriksen, Halmøy, Faraone & Haavik, 2013). It is also effective who those patients who have both ADHD and depression, which is a fairly common combination (NIMH, 2014), making it more relatable to a bigger, more diverse audience. This video can be considered a  reputable source for an alternate point of view on ADHD treatment.

 

References 

 

Fredriksen, M., Halmøy, A., Faraone, S. V., & Haavik, J. (2013). Long-term efficacy and safety of treatment with stimulants and atomoxetine in adult ADHD: A review of controlled and naturalistic studies. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 23(6), 508-527. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2012.07.016

 

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With updates on DSM-5. New York: Worth.

 

National Institute of Mental Health. (2014). Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml

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Few kids receive psychotherapy along with medication for ADHD, study finds

Few kids receive psychotherapy along with medication for ADHD, study finds | Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder | Scoop.it
For many children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, medication alone can manage symptoms.
Mychael Allen's insight:

     Psychological behavioral therapies are shown to improve ADHD symptoms (Meyers, 2014) (NIMH, 2014) especially when used in combination with medication, so for a study to find that many children with ADHD that could benefit from therapy are not receiving it is extremely alarming. However, this article does have some misinformation, in which they state that patients with ADHD and are receiving treatment for their ADHD are at risk for misusing their medication, which has been proven to be untrue (Fredriksen, Halmøy, Faraone & Haavik, 2013). Misinformation aside, this study takes information from  a very diverse section of the country, including over 1,000 different counties across the nation, however it does not specify if these counties themselves are diverse in race, socioeconomic standings, and other such factors. Between the misinformation and the diversity of the study, the reliability of this study can be put up to debate.

 

References

 

Fredriksen, M., Halmøy, A., Faraone, S. V., & Haavik, J. (2013). Long-term efficacy and safety of treatment with stimulants and atomoxetine in adult ADHD: A review of controlled and naturalistic studies. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 23(6), 508-527. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2012.07.016

 

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With updates on DSM-5. New York: Worth.

 

National Institute of Mental Health. (2014). Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml

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Treatments for ADHD

Treatments for ADHD | Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder | Scoop.it
Treatments for ADHD
Mychael Allen's insight:

     This post displays some viable options for treating ADHD symtoms, which include psychotherapy and behavioral therapy (Meyers, 2014) (NIMH, 2013), but this post completely ignores what has been found to be the most effective treatment, which is medication, typically stimulant medication  (Fredriksen, Halmøy, Faraone & Haavik, 2013). To totally ignore this type of treatment can make one think that this post is unreliable in their information that they have presented. This post also mentions dietary changes and exercise routines as making a difference in ADHD symptoms, which has not had any significant studies showing that diet and exercise make any differences. This particular post also does not show very much diversity in their information, making no reference to those with ADHD who have been helped or even attempted using medication as a treatment option. Due to this lack of proven information, this post might not be the best source of information on ADHD treatment.

 

References

 

Fredriksen, M., Halmøy, A., Faraone, S. V., & Haavik, J. (2013). Long-term efficacy and safety of treatment with stimulants and atomoxetine in adult ADHD: A review of controlled and naturalistic studies. European Neuropsychopharmacology, 23(6), 508-527. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2012.07.016

 

Myers, D. G. (2014). Exploring psychology in modules: With updates on DSM-5. New York: Worth.

 

National Institute of Mental Health. (2014). Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD). Retrieved from http://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/attention-deficit-hyperactivity-disorder-adhd/index.shtml

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