Atemporality
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Atemporality
The maps in our hands don’t match the territory, and that’s why we are upset. -- Bruce Sterling
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Transcript of Reboot 11 speech by Bruce Sterling, 25-6-2009 | Beyond The Beyond

"The unsustainable is the only frontier you have. The wreckage of the unsustainable, that’s your heritage. And here it is. It’s the old new. You’re in an old new structure."
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network culture | varnelis.net

"Postmodernity is long gone. An undergraduate today has no experience of it, nor do they recall a world before the Internet and mobile telephony, a political condition prior to neoliberalism, or an oppositional culture that had not been colonized. But we have also not had any kind of clearly identifiable rupture with postmodernity. Instead, I see network culture as an intensification of conditions latent in modernity and postmodernity. The subject, art, media, time, space, politics, the economy, and the public sphere are all radically changing, but this change is a process in which existing conditions intensify to entirely new conditions, thus sometimes becoming unrecognizable. In this book I look at these not in isolation but rather in terms of a historical period."
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Warren Ellis » spirit tracks

"1966. University of Strasbourg Student Union funds are lifted by Situationist sympathisers to print Andre Bertrand’s short comic RETURN OF THE DURUTTI COLUMN, which used stills from Hollywood movies in a process then termed detournement: familiar materials recontextualised in opposition (or at strange angles) to their original intent. This is something so common on the internet now that most people may not know there’s a word for it. It became 'culture jamming,' and now it’s simply the way we piss about on the net and do our artistic business. It’s one of the keys to cultural atemporality – everything is detourned, everything is collage, everything needs prior art. Everything is ghostly fabric. The only useful Google hit I can find for Andre Bertrand today is, funnily enough, the Wikipedia page for an attorney who specialises in copyright law."
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POSZU - ALL REAL ATEMPORAL SHIT. NO AUTHENTICITY.

POSZU - ALL REAL ATEMPORAL SHIT. NO AUTHENTICITY. | Atemporality | Scoop.it
"Atemporality is the point at which this temporality begins to break down, though still in a temporal way. We still have a sense of time, but the wide span we call “history” begins to get weird loops, whorls, and whirlpools in it. The usual cycle of fads booming and busting grow eccentric, and spin oddly off-center. The idea of what is “current” begins to break down. We have trouble remembering if something used to be common a long time ago, or if that was today but maybe in Japan, or if maybe someone simply suggested that it would happen soon in the future. The river of time spreads out into a brackish salt marsh delta, and we know time is still flowing, but we don’t remember where it was we were trying to go. Were we trying to go? What does that even mean?"
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William Gibson on "Atemporality" posted by Martin McClellan

"Your bleeding-edge Now is always someone else’s past. Someone else’s ’70s bellbottoms. Grasp that and start to attain atemporality." -- William Gibson
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Atemporality for the Creative Artist | Beyond The Beyond

"So, what is ‘atemporality’? I think it’s best defined as ‘a problem in the philosophy of history’. And I hate to resort to philosophy, because I am a novelist. But I don’t think we have any way out here. It is about the nature of historical knowledge. What we can know about the past, and about the present, and about the future. How do we represent and explain history to ourselves? What are its structures and its circumstances? What are the dynamics of history and futurity? What has happened before? What is happening now? What is really likely to happen next?"
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Hauntological Futures | booktwo.org

"Hauntology is also a network effect engendered by the increasing apparent* flattening of history and time. The network, fragmented and unevenly distributed, induces a growing sense that alternative worlds are very close indeed.

( * The internet only appears to be flat, as we perceive it in two dimensions. In fact, the knowledge it embodies, because it is tied to and instantiated in time, is ever receding from us, darkening and thickening and coming apart, becoming harder to reach and harder to find. The past is intractable but loosened, suffering our gaze upon it and our endless reinterpretations of it.)

As such, it is amenable to the same critical apparatus as Network Realism: indeed, it may be a part of the same thing."
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BLDGBLOG: The Elephant's Foot

BLDGBLOG: The Elephant's Foot | Atemporality | Scoop.it
"The article is at once a sobering introduction to the inhuman spans of time across which matter remains radioactive—the author quips, for instance, that 'The death of a nuclear reactor has a beginning... But it doesn’t have an end,' and that 'one had to look at [Chernobyl] to understand the sheer tedium and exhaustion of dealing with the aftermath of a meltdown. It is a problem that does not exist on a human time frame.' But, at the same time, it seems to suggest the framework for an expressionist short film: a Sam Beckett-like encounter with something perpetually out of reach, terrifyingly out of synch with those who wait for it and buried in pharaonic concrete.

This abstract 'thing that is deep inside the reactor' is thus held outside of human contact, separated from experience by a provisional monument: the sarcophagus shell. Sheltered there, precisely because of its temporal excess, in a state of near-immortality—capable of interacting mutationally with living matter for up to a million years—the 'thing' enters into a timeframe more appropriate for mythology.

Indeed, semiotician Thomas Sebeok once proposed the creation of an 'atomic priesthood' whose responsibility, for thousands of years to come, would be to pass on information about sites of nuclear waste storage and contamination using a combination of myths, folklore, and annual rituals... "
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Rhizome | Past and Present in "Strange Simultaneity": Mark Fisher Explains Hauntology at NYU

Rhizome | Past and Present in "Strange Simultaneity": Mark Fisher Explains Hauntology at NYU | Atemporality | Scoop.it
"This 'flattening sense of time' appears to Fisher as a byproduct of what Marc Augé called 'non-places.' The airports, retail parks, franchise coffee shops, and other homogeneous buildings absent of local flavor are indeterminate temporally as well as locally...Fisher did not talk about hauntology as it applies to photography, but the Instagram and Hipstamatic iPhone app toy camera mimicry is yet another example of contemporary culture restless in temporality. The topic has fascinating artists like Harm van den Dorpel. Likewise, William Gibson and Bruce Sterling writing on atemporality in the digital age, find the specter in fashion and design. If 'history has run out,' as Fisher says, hauntology only grows more relevant as years go on."
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The Faux-Vintage Photo: Full Essay (Parts I, II and III) » Cyborgology

The Faux-Vintage Photo: Full Essay (Parts I, II and III) » Cyborgology | Atemporality | Scoop.it
"The rise of faux-vintage photography demonstrates a point that can be extrapolated to documentation on social media writ large: social media users have become always aware of the present as a potential document to be consumed by others. Facebook fixates the present as always a future past. Be it through status updates on Twitter, geographical check-ins on Foursquare, reviews on Yelp, those Instagram photos or all of the other self-documentation possibilities afforded to us by Facebook, we view our world more than ever before through what I like to call 'documentary vision.'"
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this is a456: Story of an Eye (and Another Eye, and Yet Another Eye)

this is a456: Story of an Eye (and Another Eye, and Yet Another Eye) | Atemporality | Scoop.it
"In the past several weeks, excerpts from and commentaries about Bruce Sterling's well-received talk on atemporality have been a causing a wonderful stir. For those who may not know, Sterling defines atemporality as a kind of informed, yet riff-like meditation on history that seeks to mash together past, present, and future to produce a 'pragmatic, serene skepticism about...historical narratives'. Without going into too much detail, I'll just posit that this brand of mash-up is a kind of thinking about history that complements network culture.It is a way of using the very tools that network culture offers us (via social networking sites, music, film, et cetera) to develop a way of thinking about history that is wholly contemporary. But it is a way of thinking as fraught with challenges as it is marked by contingency. This is no mere cutting-and-pasting, no run-of-the-mill dislocating or fragmenting of previous forms of knowledge or artistic expression into cutesy collages or wan websites. Work is involved! Sterling offers us a dual challenge: to not only make atemporality fun, but to also make it do some intellectual heavy-lifting. In short, atemporality is a practice in search of a theory. This does not make atemporality a suspect practice. I think it's quite the opposite: atemporality is as plausible as it is alluring."
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