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Proof versus Evidence in Training Evaluation

Proof versus Evidence in Training Evaluation | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it

By Olga Polyakova

Director, ATDChi Newsletters

 

Whenever I talk to L&D professionals who have stumbled into the field by chance, similar to myself, we sooner or later start talking about our efforts to evaluate training. Usually, my counterparts fall into one of the three categories: 1. Doing no formal evaluation or applying standard forms that "came with their LMS"; 2. Implementing good quantitative and qualitative analytics they developed over the years; or 3. Working through the levels of Kirkpatrick's evaluation model, where possible supplemented by Phillips' ROI.

 

Which category do you see yourself in? 

 

I have been in the second category for many, many years and had not heard about Scriven, Kirkpatrick, and Phillips until my first ATD Conference a few years ago. Had I been doing it all wrong? Was I a bad L&D professional? I doubt it, but it was definitely eye-opening to discover a new world of tools and resources for effective evaluation of learning and organizational development initiatives. 

 

Jumping on the evaluation bandwagon has proven very beneficial in my work, and has enabled me to better serve my internal clients. However, it has also proven to be hard.

 

In my experience, good quality evaluation is not difficult. The steps are, in fact, very simple. But implementing them is so not easy. Kirkpatrick's model with its very robust four-level search for proof of program effectiveness is great. But it also takes a lot of time and resources. In our current fast-paced business environment, most companies are short on both. Given these constraints, I started my quest for alternatives to the Kirkpatrick/Phillips model combo. Was there something out there that was as credible but took less time and effort? 

 

It turns out there was. Enter the Success Case Method (or SCM) by Robert Brinkerhoff.

 

Brinkerhoff describes SCM as a blend of storytelling and rigorous evaluation techniques. The purpose is to find out how well an organizational or training initiative is working, as well as explain the environmental factors that differentiate success in the application of learnings or new approaches.

 

Three key elements that differ SCM from Kirkpatrick and Philips, in my opinion, are:

  • The approach is very contextual. It acknowledges that change does not happen in a vacuum and therefore should not be evaluated as such. In essence, it is the opposite of isolating the impact of a program/initiative, which is at the core of Philips' ROI methodology. 
  • Despite its name, the method looks both for successes and failures when it comes to learners trying to apply new skills on the job. According to the method, understanding why something is not working allows us to both better understand the success, and improve the outcomes in the future. SCM also includes a technique to calculate a program’s "unrealized value" – the additional benefits a program can achieve if a greater number of participants use the same methods employed by its more successful users. How powerful is that?
  • The final difference is the approach to presenting results. SCM relies on storytelling, which brings specific examples – individuals and their success stories – to the forefront. However, it does not rely solely on first-hand accounts. The method requires confirmation of claims in a way that would "stand up in court."  The author gives very specific and easy to implement steps of ensuring this quality of data.

 

While Kirkpatrick and Philips both have very robust approaches to training evaluation, they more often than not send us on complicated proof-gathering missions. Brinkerhoff’s method is more aligned with the way our brains actually work – suggesting that we gather evidence and then deliver it using powerful narratives. It is much more intuitive, taking less time, and working just as well.

 

Is your head spinning with the complexity of training evaluation models?

 

Are you in a pinch and on the hook to implement high-quality evaluation to an existing program?

 

Or are you just looking for ways to expand your toolkit as an L&D professional?

 

In each of these cases, I would suggest looking into the Success Case Method by Robert Brinkerhoff.  If you would like to discuss this topic with me at an upcoming ATDChi event, let me know!

 

References:

Brinkerhoff, R. (2003) The Success Case Method: Find Out Quickly What’s Working and What’s Not. San Francisco, CA: Berrett-Koehler Publishers.

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Time to Take Our Own Advice

Time to Take Our Own Advice | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
To mark our 75th anniversary, ATD is talking to Elaine Biech about where the field of talent development has been, where it is going, and what professionals need to succeed.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

This article was published as part of a series recognizing ATD's 75th anniversary.  ATDChi is also turning 75 this year, which we'll celebrate on December 6, 2018.  Sign up now to attend this special event at https://atdchi.org/event-3069747   Member early registration ends November 24th.  

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Modern Learning in the Age of Analytics and Intelligent Machines

Modern Learning in the Age of Analytics and Intelligent Machines | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
According to a recent article by Josh Bersin, while the global learning and development (L&D) industry is worth $200 billion, many learning professionals believe that half of this money is wasted. In Learning Analytics, John Mattox II et al. cite research on waste being even higher — between 60 percent to 90 percent. The challenge
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

If you missed Trish Uhl earlier this month at Lake Forest Graduate School of Management, here's an article you may want to review.  It covers a number of topics that Trish covered in her one-day workshop with ATDChi.  

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3 Genius Ways to Stretch Your Offsite Learning Budget | Talent Management Blog | Saba + Halogen

3 Genius Ways to Stretch Your Offsite Learning Budget | Talent Management Blog | Saba + Halogen | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Offsite training can be a great way for your people to learn from experts in a dynamic environment. Here are three ways to stretch your offsite L&D budget.
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15 Trends That Will Redefine Executive Coaching In The Next Decade 

15 Trends That Will Redefine Executive Coaching In The Next Decade  | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
What will set successful executive coaches apart from others is their ability to demonstrate measurable results.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

If you're interested in continuing to develop your Coaching competency, be sure you understand the trends that will continue to affect this area.  Here's a quick related read from Forbes, including a quote from ATDChi's President Elect, Hayward Suggs.   

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Why Talent Development Shouldn’t Fear AI

Why Talent Development Shouldn’t Fear AI | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
AI will help talent development making hiring and training more intelligent, personalized, and effective.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

If you've been curious about "AI for TD", you'll want to check out this article from TD.org.  

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Are you ready to start the workplace learning analytics journey?

Are you ready to start the workplace learning analytics journey? | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Get started on your workplace learning analytics strategy and deliver measurable value to the people and organisations you serve who, in turn, can learn faster and achieve more.  
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

Want to learn more about learning analytics?  Sign up now to join Trish Uhl and ATDChi on October 4, 2018, at Lake Forest Graduate School of Management for an all-day workshop.  Visit atdchi.org for more details!  

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3 Basic Data Visualizations L&D Pros Should Master

3 Basic Data Visualizations L&D Pros Should Master | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Data visualizations are a valuable tool for L&D pros to use within eLearning and in performance support tools. They are also an excellent way to measure and demonstrate the effectiveness of training, showing managers the value of eLearning and performance support. L&D pros can choose from dozens of ways to visualize data.
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How to Build a Successful Social Learning Platform

How to Build a Successful Social Learning Platform | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
What can learning professionals do to ensure that their social learning platform is a success? Here are some tips.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

If you're working on a social learning initiative (or plan to in the future), this article includes some helpful tips for getting started.  

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Why You Should Use Design Thinking to Integrate Learning into Day-to-Day Work 

Why You Should Use Design Thinking to Integrate Learning into Day-to-Day Work  | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Maybe it’s happened to you: your employee satisfaction scores for learning are low. Training, or the lack of quality of training, comes up in worker exit interviews. Does it feel like learning in your organization is something that has to be endured so people can get back to their “real” jobs? That’s a bad feeling …
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

Here's a concise and helpful blog by Bersin related to design thinking.  Photo by rawpixel on Unsplash

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The Importance of a Global Mindset

The Importance of a Global Mindset | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Clearly, you cannot conduct training in today’s multicultural organizations without a global mindset an
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

This article is a nice complement to the content shared by Stephanie Leese-Emrich at January's ATDChi kick-off event.  

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Giving and Receiving: Scholarships Offer Benefits for Recipients and Organizations Alike 

Giving and Receiving:  Scholarships Offer Benefits for Recipients and Organizations Alike  | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it

By Nicole Buras, Former ATDChi Director, University Relations and

Susan Camberis, Editor, Training Today

Photo by Tim Gouw on Unsplash

 

According to the College Board, “in 2014-15, about two-thirds of full-time students paid for college with the help of financial aid in the form of grants and scholarships.”

 

If you have ever received a scholarship, you have likely experienced first-hand some tangible recipient benefits. 

 

But what types of benefits do scholarships provide to those who give them?   

 

Scholarships provide a number of benefits for recipients’ professional development and for the organizations that give them. 

 

For recipients, the most obvious and immediate benefit is compensation. Some scholarships come with other perks such memberships to associated organizations. The financial assistance both in an award and a membership can be significant to students, who are not typically earning high wages while paying for tuition, books, and supplies. Students are also often investing in other avenues of professional development, such as memberships to professional organizations and attendance to workshops and conferences at their own expense. 

 

Beyond the monetary benefit, a scholarship represents an achievement one can leverage. Listing a scholarship on a resume, curriculum vitae, and/or on a job application (if requested by a company), can demonstrate that one went above and beyond in his or her education.  Recipients can further leverage scholarship honors by connecting the honor received with characteristics or values identified by companies they seek to work with.

 

For organizations, scholarships provide a way to give back and to help build communities they serve. When a scholarship aligns directly to an organization’s mission, it can help promote positive public relations.  Memorial scholarships honor leaders and innovators in their respective fields and disciples. For example, ATDChi’s Dr. Deborah Colky Workplace Learning and Performance Student Award honors Dr. Colky’s memory and embodies the Association for Talent Development Chicagoland Chapter’s (ATDChi) mission. ATDChi strives to empower “members with the knowledge, skills, tools, and resources necessary to ensure ongoing professional development…,” and more narrowly, groom the next generation of Talent Development professionals.

 

Many scholarships and awards also require a project, internship, or other deliverables; for example, a recipient might be required to develop a program or conduct research in the award's area of focus and present the results back to the awarding institution. These projects are frequently designed to be mutually beneficial – providing tangible benefits to the organization and the student.  The Dr. Deborah Colky Student Award represents an honor with an associated project and an opportunity to publish an article in Training Today. Two significant achievements one can also document on his or her resume. Recipients can also highlight these types of professional experiences as they demonstrate an application of skills in their career areas.

 

Scholarships that require specific deliverables may also connect recipients to advisors or mentors. Mentors can guide young professionals, not only in the context of a project, but also through broader career issues. If a recipient is not assigned a mentor directly, the exposure of an award can still offer opportunities for the recipient to be noticed by other tenured professionals. Effective mentors encourage and share their knowledge. The mentee may approach a mentor about career transitions, development opportunities, and/or challenges. A mentor may take a recipient under his or her wing at a networking event or professional conference, or be a reference for future career opportunities. How often do we hear,... it is not what you know, but who you know!

 

ATDChi’s 2017 Dr. Deborah Colky scholarship recipient, Olga Polyakova, believes that the ATDChi scholarship has benefited her professional development.  As North America Learning & Development Lead, Planning & Analytics with the Boston Consulting Group, Olga believes the scholarship has not only supported her studies but also helped to affirm her credibility in the field, opened doors to the local L&D community and enabled to establish new meaningful relationships with thought leaders in the profession.

 

Whether your future career plans include going back to school or supporting others in their efforts to do so, there are significant benefits to receiving and giving scholarships.  

 

To learn more about the Dr. Deborah Colky Award visit: https://atdchi.org/Colky_Award

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Ultimate Service POV: What Role Does Service Play in Workplace Learning? 

Ultimate Service POV: What Role Does Service Play in Workplace Learning?  | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Formerly ASTD
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

Stephanie Leese-Emrich delighted attendees at January's ATDChi 2018 kick-off meeting.  If you're a Power Member and want to hear more from Stephanie, here's a 2012 webcast you may want to re-visit.

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New Hire Orientation versus Onboarding

New Hire Orientation versus Onboarding | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it

By Dr. Gia Suggs

ATDChi Co-Director, Professional Development Networks

 

Approximately 89% of managers believe that employees leave their jobs for more money. However, approximately 88% of employees said they left their jobs for reasons other than money.1

 

Interesting disparity, wouldn’t you agree?

 

Employees actually do not leave their jobs; they leave their bosses. If employees do not respect, appreciate, get along with, or even like those they are accountable to, they are more likely to leave.2

 

Socialization is the process of acclimating individuals to critical elements of an organization’s culture and helping them connect to those there are accountable to and for partnering with professionally. It can have a pervasive impact on new-employee adjustment. It bridges the potential of a new employee’s talent with the opportunity to actualize it.3

 

Onboarding is the new talent-engagement process that focuses on acclimating employees both functionally and socially.

 

What does this mean?

 

  • Functional acclimation is about understanding the company’s philosophies, completing tasks, and performing activities.4

 

  • Social acclimation is about integrating into the company’s culture and becoming a part of the group.5

 

How are these different?

 

It is the difference between New Hire Orientation and Onboarding!

 

Here are some high-level distinctions.

 

New Hire Orientation addresses employee’s functional acclimation including:

 

  • General policies and procedures
  • Job descriptions, tasks, and expectations
  • Organizational culture and values
  • General policies and procedures 6

 

Clearly, each of these is necessary for new employees to get started on the right foot at their new company. Notice, however, the tactics employed to deliver new hire orientation is information dissemination and content mastery. 7

 

This is necessary but often incomplete.

 

Onboarding is an extension of the new hire orientation process.

 

Onboarding addresses employee’s social acclimation including:

 

  • Integrating new employees into their company’s culture
  • Socializing new employees as a part of their team
  • Informing new employees of “who” they need to know (orientation often covers the “what”)
  • Expediting the learning curve to full productivity 8

 

A successful strategy for new employees includes both!

 

Gia Suggs EdD, MPH, MA is an Organization Development Consultant. She manages a private practice and is a Distinguished Adjunct Professor at Olivet Nazarene University and serves as Adjunct Faculty at the University of Illinois at Chicago.

Dr. Gia is the author of the following books:

  • Onboarding; Maximizing the Success of New Employees (Suggs, 2013)
  • Shattering the Glass Ceiling; How to Break Through Without Breaking Down (Suggs & Suggs, 2017)

To learn more about and to connect with Dr. Gia, visit  www.DrGia.com.

 

Reference List:

 

  1. William, R. (2003). Organizational entry: Onboarding, orientation, and socialization. Mellon learning curve research study. New York: Mellon Corporation. In 2002, the United States Department of Labor. 

  2. Buckingham, M. & Coffman, C. (1999). First break all the rules: What the world’s greatest managers do differently. New York, NY: Simon & Schuster.
  3. Ashforth, B. & Saks, A. (1995). Work-role transitions: A longitudinal examination of the Nicholson model. Journal of Occupational and Organizational Psychology, 68, 157-175.
  4. Truesdell, W. (1998). New employee orientation: Starting off on the right foot. The Management Advantage, Inc. retrieved August 6, 2010, from http://www.management advantage. com/products/free-ee2.htm.
  5. Dai, G. & De Meuse, G. (2007). A review of onboarding research. Los Angeles: Korn/Ferry International. Retrieved July 2009, from pdf1/Review_OnboardingLiterature.pdf.
  6. Truesdell, W. (1998). New employee orientation: Starting off on the right foot. The Management Advantage, Inc. retrieved August 6, 2010, from http://www.management advantage. com/products/free-ee2.htm.
  7. Adelsberg , D., & Trolley, E. (1999). Running training like a business: Delivering unmistakable value. San Francisco: Berrett-Koehler.
  8. Suggs, G., (2014). Maximize the Success of New Employees, Onboarding: A Flightplan for Taking Your Workforce to New Heights, Charleston: BFP Books.
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"Behind Every Good Decision" by Piyanka Jain and Puneet Sharma 

"Behind Every Good Decision" by Piyanka Jain and Puneet Sharma  | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
The nerdy topic of business analytics is made easy to understand and useful in the book “Behind Every Good Decision: How Anyone Can Use Business Analytics
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

Here's a review for one of the books that Trish Uhl recommended during her one-day Learning Analytics Workshop with ATDChi earlier this month..  

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Transformation starts with agile leadership | McKinsey

Transformation starts with agile leadership | McKinsey | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Agile leadership addresses mind-sets and capabilities needed for a successful organizational transformation.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

This recent article by McKinsey is a nice complement to our discussions earlier this year regarding Agile and Instructional Design.  I especially like the three fundamental reactive-to-creative mindset shifts that the article cites for fostering a culture of innovation, collaboration, and value-creating.  

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A Roadmap for Developing Your Mobile Strategy

A Roadmap for Developing Your Mobile Strategy | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it

By Tiffany Prince

Founder and Managing Partner of Prince Performance LLC

 

Many companies these days are “going digital” so what does that mean for learning and performance professionals? In thinking about using mobile technology for your learners, you need to understand how to use this medium best. It is good for short bites of information or providing theory. In developing content to be provided via mobile, it is best to think of it as an eBook format or read as a webpage -- think of the items you view on your phone and how you “like” items. It is helpful to break up text with videos, infographs, short interactivities like flashcards or things learners can interact with to break up just reading a bunch of text.

 

My client work has allowed me to interact with many viewpoints of digital content and how it can be curated. The design of the content needs to be more from a storytelling or “what’s in it for me” format than other online content otherwise you will lose your audience quickly. The good news is that most publishing software taps into some form of analytics either Google or built-in so that you can track what content is working and what needs to be updated/removed/changed quickly. The way I see that works best is breaking it down into smaller sections or chapters. This allows learners to have information broken down into short, consumable content when they have a few minutes. If you think about this, we are doing it this way in our personal lives, so why not with content you need to do your job better or new information?

 

As this is a new format for most trainers or subject matter experts, I have found it takes some coaching to get usable content. My suggestion is to get it in sections or chapters then convert that into the digital platform, so they can see it for themselves and how it will display. You can show them other content displayed in this format but for some reason, the light bulb doesn’t go off until they see their content. It may take some time to get to this point, but you will know once it happens as the content structure changes. It even helps to talk in stories where possible. I have found videos are good for this, especially when bringing complex concepts to life. Developing work situations where employees must use these skills or knowledge helps the learner see how it could or has been translated in a real-life scenario.

 

There is a balance in providing text and mixing it up with other graphics or visuals. One or two videos or audios per section is about right. This assumes that each section is no longer than 10-15 minutes. Developing content in this format can be harder than others, as it takes the “less is more” approach. However, you can go too slim as well, so making sure you have meaningful, relevant content for each section takes planning. In working with my clients, I try to develop or understand the objective for each section to keep on track and to know what to add or trim, based on the objective.

 

Creating graphics and visuals are also important aspects to making content come alive for the learner. If you are not good at creating graphics or do not have access to graphics software, consider investing in the resources to create those. Again, this may take some more planning or iterations, but it is worth the time as visuals are easier for learners to digest information.

 

The bottom line for any organization in providing skills or content in a digital format is to test and see what works best for the organization. Your digital strategy should be part of an overall learning strategy, not just a “one-off” solution. I find that digital frequently works best as either pre- or post-work in a blended learning course. Don’t be afraid to launch – the feedback from the learners will guide you on what and how they like to consume. Remember, it is a learning journey, not an event!

 

Tiffany Prince is the Founder and Managing Partner of Prince Performance LLC and a former ATDChi Board Member.  As an experienced Organizational Development & Performance Consultant, Tiffany helps her clients develop systematic and effective organizational change.  She specializes in developing processes, systems and structures to support an overall learning & development strategy, and is internationally recognized for her work.  To learn more about Tiffany and Prince Performance LLC, visit http://www.princeperformance.solutions/

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Thinking about TD Certification?  5 Expert Tips to Consider  

By Susan Camberis
Editor, Training Today

 

If you have been considering Talent Development (TD) certification, ATDChi’s June Networking Dinner and Clinic, which featured a panel discussion with local TD professionals sharing their certification experiences, was designed with you in mind.  

 

The Association for Talent Development’s Certification Institute (ATD CI) offers two certifications based on the ATD competency model:

 

  • The Certified Professional in Learning and Performance (CPLP) is broad-based, covering 10 areas of expertise (or AOEs).  It consists of a three-hour knowledge exam and a three-hour skills application exam.

 

  • The Associate Professional in Talent Development (APTD) covers three primary AOEs as defined by the ATD competency model:  instructional design, training delivery, and learning technologies.  It consists of one two-hour exam. 

 

Bill Cupuro, CPLP, and ATDChi’s Director of CPLP, moderated a discussion entitled “Exploring the CPLP and APTD:  Should It Be in Your Career Plan?”  Panelists included:  Anthony Dudek, CPLP, 2018 ATDChi President; Dave Lee, CPLP, Learning Strategist; Eileen Terrell, CPLP, ATDChi Vice President of Communications and 2018 President-Elect; Kirsten Walker, APTD, ATDChi Director of Event Management; and Tom West, CPLP, 2017 ATDChi President. 

 

If you are thinking about certification, here are 5 expert tips to consider: 

 

  1. Know your “why”.  Motivation matters – especially when considering certification.  For Anthony Dudek, certification was about the joy of learning and expanding his professional knowledge base.  Eileen Terrell saw the CPLP as a natural progression.  After completing ATDChi’s WLPI program (https://atdchi.org/WLPI), Terrell viewed the CPLP as an opportunity to “go wider” – broadening her TD thinking in a more integrated way.  Kirsten Walker chose to pursue the APTD during its 2017 pilot period.  As a self-described “accidental trainer”, Walker wanted a way to learn and share knowledge with her company.

  2. Decide which certification is right for you.  The CPLP is designed for professionals with five or more years of experience, or four years experience with one year of schooling.  The APTD is designed for professionals with at least three years of experience in talent development or a related field, or at least two years of experience plus one year of schooling.

  3. Make time to study.  Both exams require time to prepare, so making sure you have the bandwidth is critical. Terrell studied for approximately five months for the CPLP knowledge exam.  Once she passed it, she then studied for approximately three more months before taking the skills application exam.

  4. Have a study plan.  While panelists’ test preparation methods varied, everyone agreed that having a study plan is a “must.” Dave Lee found the Rocky Mountain online study group (https://www.atdrmc.org/CPLP-Study-Group) helpful with “pacing” the content.  Sessions are facilitated by participants and cover one AOE each week for 12 weeks.  All panelists used study materials available through ATD CI and some use accountability partners or “study buddies”.

  5. Once you’ve earned it, keep your certification up-to-date.  To keep CPLP and APTD credentials “current,” professionals must re-certify every three years.   Both re-certification processes are points-based.  CPLPs need at least 60 points during each three-year cycle, and APTDs need at least 40 points.  Tom West explained that points can be earned through continuing education, speaking and instructing, ATDChi board membership, ATD membership, research and publishing, and on-the job experience. 

 

For questions or to learn more certification, contact ATDChi's Director of CPLP, Bill Cupuro, CPLP

 

Post originally published through ATDChi's Chatter Blog.

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Psychologically-Based Principles for Effective eLearning

Psychologically-Based Principles for Effective eLearning | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
eLearning is effective when basic understanding of how the brain works is employed in design
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Crowdsource Your Employees Before Investing in Learning and Development

Crowdsource Your Employees Before Investing in Learning and Development | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Boeing will change its approach to learning and development after it crowdsourced and surveyed its 141,322 workers. It wanted employee feedback on how it should invest the $100 million it had pledged toward a workforce development program.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

Looking for fresh ideas for how to allocate TD budget dollars?  You may want to check out this recent article from SHRM.

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Challenges With Converting Classroom Training to E-Learning

Challenges With Converting Classroom Training to E-Learning | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Diane discusses some of the challenges involved in converting classroom training to e-learning.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

If you missed our April workshop presenter, Diane Elkins, here's a great video snippet you'll want to check out.  

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Is xAPI Ready? If so, where are our flying cars?

Is xAPI Ready? If so, where are our flying cars? | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
As a technology-driven industry, those of us in the eLearning field get to participate in the adoption of many new and potentially disruptive technologies. Moving to an xAPI-based infrastructure is one of these opportunities. April 2018 marks the fifth anniversary of xAPI’s release. A question posed by many is: After five years, is xAPI ready? Excited early adopters risk setting expectations as wildly futuristic as the flying cars envisioned in the 1960s TV cartoon The Jetsons.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

Want to learn more about xAPI?  Here is a helpful article co-authored by our March members-only skill-building clinic facilitator, Megan Torrance.  

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Consider the SME’s Strengths: from “Effective SMEs” –

Consider the SME’s Strengths: from “Effective SMEs” – | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Presentation training and facilitation training in Chicago by Turpin Communication.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

Dale Ludwig and Greg Owen-Boger shared their expertise at February's ATDChi Networking Clinic.  Here's an excerpt from their latest book Effective SMEs.  

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2018 Instructional Design Trends And Learning Trends: The Journey Of Learning

2018 Instructional Design Trends And Learning Trends: The Journey Of Learning | ATDChi's Training Today | Scoop.it
Interested in the latest Instructional Design Trends? Check which Instructional Design Trends and learning trends you'll be hearing about in 2018.
ATDChi Training Today's insight:

Which of these trends are you noticing in your work?

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