Assessment
2 views | +0 today
Follow
Your new post is loading...
Your new post is loading...
Scooped by Tracey Ford
Scoop.it!

Pupils 'being damaged by endless tests set by Gove' - The Times (subscription)

The Times (subscription)
Pupils 'being damaged by endless tests set by Gove'
The Times (subscription)
The Poet Laureate today leads 200 writers and academics in calling for Michael Gove's school reforms to be suspended.
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tracey Ford from Common Core Online
Scoop.it!

Escaping the Dark Ages of Standardized Testing

Escaping the Dark Ages of Standardized Testing | Assessment | Scoop.it

Technology has the potential to transform teaching and learning. It is already sparking a revolution in standardized tests. (Anti-testing zealots pointing states in the wrong direction. There were no 'good old days'.


Via Darren Burris
more...
No comment yet.
Rescooped by Tracey Ford from The MarTech Digest
Scoop.it!

Online testing: Two common reasons to use a radical redesign test approach | MarketingExperiments

Online testing: Two common reasons to use a radical redesign test approach | MarketingExperiments | Assessment | Scoop.it

Digest...

 

Let’s get clear on what I mean by a radical redesign test approach.

A radical redesign is a test approach in which a test variation that contains multiple variables (often unrelated) is manipulated in an unstructured manner.

In short, it’s a big shakeup on a test variation that equates to a roll of the dice.

 

Here are two common potential reasons to go radical we often encounter in test planning with our Research Partners …

 

Reason #1: Nothing else seems to work! (Or, “I can’t move the needle!”)

If you find yourself running multiple single-factorial and variable cluster tests to no avail, then maybe it’s time to go back to the drawing board and create a new radical treatment that seeks to rejuvenate the testing process and offer a new baseline for subsequent incremental tests.

 

Reason #2: Risk is not a concern for you (or your boss)

If you’re looking to make an impact and aren’t currently too worried about the potential for loss, then radical redesigns are often an exciting test approach with high potential for large impacts.

 


Via CYDigital
more...
CYDigital's curator insight, June 11, 2013 11:24 AM

I think we've all found ourselves in this position. The Scientific Approach calls for hypothesis testing, and if you're not coming up with anything that is better than the control group, shake things up. BTW: the control group may very well be what the doctor ordered.


  • See the article at www.marketingexperiments.com
  • Receive a daily summary of The Marketing Automation Alert directly to your inbox. Subscribe here (your privacy is protected).
  • If you like this scoop, PLEASE share by using the links below.
  • iNeoMarketing drives more revenue and opportunities for B2B companies using marketing technologies. Contact us
Rescooped by Tracey Ford from College and Career-Ready Standards for School Leaders
Scoop.it!

Too many "bubble tests" give standardized testing a "bad rap": Enter technology

Too many "bubble tests" give standardized testing a "bad rap": Enter technology | Assessment | Scoop.it
Technology has the potential to transform teaching and learning. It is already sparking a revolution in standardized tests.

Via Mel Riddile
more...
Jenny Sloane's curator insight, November 24, 2013 8:12 PM

After reading this article, I was left with many questions. First, why are some standardized tests so much more expensvie and what are the advantages to those tests? For states and schools that do not have the resources, what are they supposed to do or how can they afford even more expensive technology and tests? Furthermore, I think it is debatable whether students should receive different questions on their tests. The whole purpose of standardized tests is for every student to take the same test, hence the name "standardized". This is the first I have ever heard about having computerized tests that will change the level of difficulty of the following questions depending on the performance of the student. I think all students should take the same test; top students will just earn really high scores, but those are the scores that they deserve. If students are answering different questions how can you compare scores? I also thought it was an interesting point about "cut scores". I recently took the Praxis I exam and noticed that every state had different required scores in order to pass. I do not think that is fair. Who gets to decide what are passing scores and why should it differ from state to state? Although the Huffington Post is a reliable source, I wish this article went into more detail that would have answered some of my questions.