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You Won't Believe How Much Water It Takes To Grow Your Favorite Foods

You Won't Believe How Much Water It Takes To Grow Your Favorite Foods | Aspiring Linchpin | Scoop.it
This story originally appeared on Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

California, supplier of nearly half of all US fruits, veggies, and nuts, is on track to experience the driest year in the past half mi...

Via Alan Yoshioka
Kaitlyn Cunigan's insight:

     Seeing as grapes take the least amount of water to grow, I say save more water and make more wine!
     Growing up in Northern California in a farming community had it's pros and cons. Fresh and cheap fruit and veggies all year round, annual strawberry festivals, Zin capital- The common sighting of semi-trucks full of slaughter and the ever so wonderful aroma of cow manure in the mornings. I remember going to picnics at a family friend's rice farm. He'd fill a canal up with water that blasted from a gigantic pipe into a hole where a tire swing hung above. We'd jump in and swim down the canal where we'd slide through tubing like it was the coolest water park ever to have existed. I remember my mom explaining to me why those channels around the field were there. "Do you know how they grow the rice? They flood this entire field with water!" It seemed so impossible to me at the time. Where did all the water come from? While industrialized farming has taken over the planet and climate change creeps in more rapidly every year causing such extreme droughts, I think it's a good time to really stress the idea of more urban farming. Now, living on the east side of the state of Michigan, my eyes have really been opened to the positive effects of this kind of sustainability. Not only is it a healthier option for the atmosphere, it calls for minimal fertilizer recycled from waste and little to no pesticides making it better to consume as well. The Michigan Urban Farming Initiative actively looks to instill this into the community to reduce the impacts of socioeconomic imbalance not only locally but globally. So, unless you're a prepper with your underground bungalow stocked to the nines with essentials, wouldn't you rather have access to local food instead of that vacant lot down the street when the end times draw near?

     A large part of our family friend's crops went to Uncle Ben's. To this day, I still look at that orange box on the grocery store shelf and think about the amount of water used to fill those fields, the amount of pollution that's produced to maintain those crops as well as transport them, the amount of pesticides and preservatives, the list goes on. Wouldn't it make more sense to try and avoid the droughts from happening by  preventing the decay of our communities and ozone layer? 

 http://www.miufi.org/

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Eric Larson's curator insight, February 26, 2014 5:46 PM

Fruits and veggies are amazing, but do talk water. 

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The #Future Is What We Are #Now/ Why Are You #Voting ?

The #Future Is What We Are #Now/ Why Are You #Voting ? | Aspiring Linchpin | Scoop.it
I really hate all the voting propaganda. If there’s one thing I took away from reading about the invention of public opinion into society, it’s that everyone follows a crowd or is part of a group that...
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#Girl, You a #MESS! First #Impressions and #Appearance

#Girl, You a #MESS! First #Impressions and #Appearance | Aspiring Linchpin | Scoop.it
My dad is a sales whiz. His numbers climb every year and he’s one of the top ten sellers in the United States for his company. It’s no wonder I’ve acquired such a persuasive personality when it comes...
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Why pay $50 when you can pay $5? Professor Robert Cialdini explains how behavioral science can save you money

Why pay $50 when you can pay $5? Professor Robert Cialdini explains how behavioral science can save you money | Aspiring Linchpin | Scoop.it
Simple economics predicts that a $50 reward will undoubtedly be a more powerful motivator than a $5 one. Behavioral science, however, suggests otherwise. Speaking to a captive audience at Opower’s customer innovation conference in Miami…

Via Verilliance
Kaitlyn Cunigan's insight:

     Claim $10 if you read this insight!!! Using behavioral science is always an intriguing way to look at the customer. The video in the article talks about the science behind survey rewards. Like many companies, the one I work for also has an attached survey for the customer to take for a reward. The reward is 20% of one full-priced item and you must take the survey within five days of the purchase.  Most items in the store are roughly $98 and up, if you think about it, 20% is almost twenty dollars saved, but when you're dropping $500 in one transaction, is that twenty dollars worth the hassle of taking thirty minutes out of your hectic life? Most of our customers when faced with it don't think so. I almost never get a customer with the survey discount. On top of that, it doesn't usually layer with promotions that we have going on on a DAILY basis. However, majority of our shopper's are signed up for email promotions and coupons and will use those to their full advantage, but why not claim an additional reward that takes minutes to complete? Rarely, do I even get bargain hunters or sale sweepers presenting me with the coupon, but monthly, reports come back with detailed comments of their experiences good and bad. So, people are taking the survey, but where are all the rewards? Do customer's even care about the prize attached or do they genuinely just want to provide insight into how their shopping experience was to give a good (or bad) credit to the store or employee who helped them? Research shows, one of the most rewarding feelings is gratitude. Maybe that's all people really want to be rewarded with. Thank you for reading. :)

 

http://www.good.is/posts/how-we-re-making-gratitude-a-part-of-your-everyday

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Moving stories: what do you do with your books when you change houses?

Moving stories: what do you do with your books when you change houses? | Aspiring Linchpin | Scoop.it

Beulah Maud Devaney: For a nomadic generation, the question of how to look after – or get rid of – a personal library is a recurring anxiety


Via Hadifah, Sharon Bakar
Kaitlyn Cunigan's insight:

     I am subscribed to the email list of Ryan Holiday who shares his book finds and reading recommendations month to month. In one of his recent emails he explains, " I promised myself a long time ago that if I saw a book that interested me I'd never let time or money or anything else prevent me from having it." Which in his case lead to what is essentially, a garage bookstore. He often encourages avid readers to do the same for the sake of treating your education like a job. In the last year, the books I've acquired have stacked up thanks to a friend who had to move cross country, personal purchases, and smuggling them back to my place from my father's collection. And, while they don't take up a great deal of room in my apartment, I'm left with the dilemma of what's to become of them when I leave here. It's one thing to pack a mattress and seven foot mirror into my little Mazda truck, but it's another thing when you've got boxes full of books you need to stuff in somewhere as well. Like the article mentions, the sentimental aspect of keeping books along for the ride is one I treasure. My grandmother is the definition of a pack rat, but one great thing that comes along with it is the times my sister and I have had the pleasure to sit in front of the dingy basement bookcase and sift through her old nursing books and cloth covered classics. So while it may be a pain, Ryan Holiday and this article bring to light the marvelous concept of sharing your space and continually being in the company of books. Whether it be for aesthetics or the fact that you're a bibliophile, books are necessary for everyone to own... But you don't have to take my word for it!

 http://theperspectivecollective.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/01/thumbs_we_need_to_make_books_cool_again_if_you_go_home_with_somebody_and_they_dont_have_books_dont_fuck_them_john_waters.jpg

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Sharon Bakar's curator insight, February 23, 2014 11:51 PM

I face having to downsize my library for the next house move ...

Beth Gross's curator insight, February 24, 2014 6:17 PM

An excellent essay on the power that books have.  I'm a confessed bookworm and I know that if I was forced to give up any, I would crawl into a depression. No books is like....no sun.

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#Crowd #State of #Mind

#Crowd #State of #Mind | Aspiring Linchpin | Scoop.it
Kaitlyn Cunigan's insight:

     The other day I heard three morning radio personalities talking and surveying about whether or not everything you say to your significant other or most anyone for that matter is to manipulate thinking or actions. Immediately I sided with the women who agreed that not everything said was to be used as a means for influencing the other. I really thought about it for a while and realized that sort of unconsciously, my thinking had been shaped one way or the other by opinions and words. While it may not always be negatively, it’s true, that the things we do and say directly impact those around us. Mahatma Gandhi said, “Your beliefs become your thoughts, your thoughts become your words, your words become you actions, your actions become your values, your values become your destiny.” Is it really too far off to think that the words of someone you care about or know are guiding your own thoughts and feelings? I recently read Edward Bernays’ book, “Crystallizing Public Opinion” where he discusses the formation and role the “public relations counsel” or what we know as PR agencies play in shaping the public’s point of view. The book is from the early 1900s, but can easily still be applied to the way our opinions are constructed today through the help of media and what he refers to as our crowd or herd. “One of the psychological results of homogeneity,” Bernays says, “is the fact that physical loneliness is a real terror to the gregarious animal, and that association with the herd causes a feeling of security. In man this fear of loneliness creates a desire for identification with the herd in matters of opinion.” He goes into great detail about how these herds are dissected again and again in order to put pressure on certain stereotypes or crowds to persuade their way of thinking through certain mediums. Quoted in Bernays book is another guru of public opinion, Walter Lippmann who says, “For the most part we do not fist see and then define, we define first and then see.” Not only has it put in to perspective the various occasions and levels of media we’re exposed to on the daily, it has really opened my mind to wonder, do I really think that or do I only think that because someone wielded this idea into my head? “The crowd is a state of mind which permeates society and its individuals at almost all times.”

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#Happiness Means #Creativity: One Company's Bet On Positive #Psychology - Co.Create

#Happiness Means #Creativity: One Company's Bet On Positive #Psychology - Co.Create | Aspiring Linchpin | Scoop.it

Create Happiness Means Creativity: One Company's Bet On Positive Psychology Co.Create Cultivating a more positive outlook is a better way of boosting creativity than indulging a tortured genius, according to consultant psychologist Professor...


Via Verilliance
Kaitlyn Cunigan's insight:

     Reading this article made me quite curious as to what the "sessions" consisted of. While I've found that creativity flows abundantly when I'm in a happier state of mind, I've also found the opposite. When I'm satisfied with a final product as a result of creativity, my happiness is through the roof! This recycling of good energy is absolutely the reason I miss my old job as a cake decorator at times, and the reason I get such a thrill from writing insights! So, while not all of us have access to a wealthy company willing to provide us with positive outlook sessions, what can we be doing to actively turn that frown upside down?  One major tip that's a huge struggle for me and I hadn't taken completely seriously until recently is really being content with what I have. That means your body, your home, your friends and family. I'm about to go a little yogi on you, but when we find that balance within, it truly brings a whole new meaning to life. This doesn't mean looking for ways to improve your self, but rather, discovering and learning what positive things already surround us. Instead of filling your life with more- more material items, more people, etc. "Lightening the load" in terms of giving more freely has really been a huge success to bringing balance to my life. And, while practicing donation with material items can absolutely bring a cheerful boost into our lives. Time, for me, has always been a more rewarding endeavor when it comes to donating. Along with these methods I've used to upgrade to a blissful state, studies have shown a variety of other activities that can also increase prosperity. Nurturing current relationships, forgiving, smiling,  having meaningful conversations, being compassionate, treating your body right, and showing gratitude. If we push beyond our comfort zone to thrive for personal growth, it could ultimately bring happiness and creativity to our lives and the lives of others. Either that, or we might end up "van Gogh-ing" it and cutting off a piece of our ear...

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Verilliance's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:12 AM

"There is a strong relationship between employee happiness and a workforce that is productive, creative, and flourishing," he says, pointing to lab studies designed to test creativity after participants have been made more and less happy, which shows creative levels improve when people are happier."

Diana Rojas Zaldívar's curator insight, March 3, 2014 11:29 AM

#PositivePsychology

Rescooped by Kaitlyn Cunigan from Vertical Farm - Food Factory
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You Won't Believe How Much Water It Takes To Grow Your Favorite Foods

You Won't Believe How Much Water It Takes To Grow Your Favorite Foods | Aspiring Linchpin | Scoop.it
This story originally appeared on Mother Jones and is reproduced here as part of the Climate Desk collaboration.

California, supplier of nearly half of all US fruits, veggies, and nuts, is on track to experience the driest year in the past half mi...

Via Alan Yoshioka
Kaitlyn Cunigan's insight:

     Seeing as grapes take the least amount of water to grow, I say save more water and make more wine!
     Growing up in Northern California in a farming community had it's pros and cons. Fresh and cheap fruit and veggies all year round, annual strawberry festivals, Zin capital- The common sighting of semi-trucks full of slaughter and the ever so wonderful aroma of cow manure in the mornings. I remember going to picnics at a family friend's rice farm. He'd fill a canal up with water that blasted from a gigantic pipe into a hole where a tire swing hung above. We'd jump in and swim down the canal where we'd slide through tubing like it was the coolest water park ever to have existed. I remember my mom explaining to me why those channels around the field were there. "Do you know how they grow the rice? They flood this entire field with water!" It seemed so impossible to me at the time. Where did all the water come from? While industrialized farming has taken over the planet and climate change creeps in more rapidly every year causing such extreme droughts, I think it's a good time to really stress the idea of more urban farming. Now, living on the east side of the state of Michigan, my eyes have really been opened to the positive effects of this kind of sustainability. Not only is it a healthier option for the atmosphere, it calls for minimal fertilizer recycled from waste and little to no pesticides making it better to consume as well. The Michigan Urban Farming Initiative actively looks to instill this into the community to reduce the impacts of socioeconomic imbalance not only locally but globally. So, unless you're a prepper with your underground bungalow stocked to the nines with essentials, wouldn't you rather have access to local food instead of that vacant lot down the street when the end times draw near?

     A large part of our family friend's crops went to Uncle Ben's. To this day, I still look at that orange box on the grocery store shelf and think about the amount of water used to fill those fields, the amount of pollution that's produced to maintain those crops as well as transport them, the amount of pesticides and preservatives, the list goes on. Wouldn't it make more sense to try and avoid the droughts from happening by  preventing the decay of our communities and ozone layer? 

 http://www.miufi.org/

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Eric Larson's curator insight, February 26, 2014 5:46 PM

Fruits and veggies are amazing, but do talk water. 

Rescooped by Kaitlyn Cunigan from Collaboration sales and video
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The Power of Collaboration - YouTube

The internet is igniting a boom in the collaborative economy. From homes to food, just about everything is being shared. This video explains how it isn't onl...

Via Thierry Le Magny, Thomas2c
Kaitlyn Cunigan's insight:

     All the business books I've ever read dive deep into the idea of sharing or "gifting" selflessly and "freely" in order to succeed and last. It's true that the power of collaboration really drives the market now. It's actually quite refreshing that not only does it help our community to thrive, but also give a great deal of resolve to those utilizing technology and the world wide web as a tool to put forth knowledge and information to a world willing to learn. And, although as scary as it may be to have something so foreign to us at one time growing more rapidly each day, it's exciting that almost anything is literally at our fingertips. I can only imagine what ten more years of advancement will bring.

     Hopefully this bad boy...

 http://www.nbcnews.com/tech/innovation/hyperloop-revealed-elon-musk-foresees-rapid-transit-tube-f6C10902051

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