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Over-phone, skype interpreting service | Translation agency Baltic Media

Over-phone, skype interpreting service | Translation agency Baltic Media | ASpect2&3 | Scoop.it
Interpreting over phone or Skype. Over phone interpreting service is currently available in over 150 language combinations.
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Nick Cheripka's comment, April 4, 2014 8:28 PM
#8. the cost of this program and company varies on what languages you do. Also how complicated the text is also plays a key role in the prices too. The project manager will tell you more about how much the exact costs are. But the costs are half as much then hiring a interpreter for the moment.
Nick Cheripka's comment, April 4, 2014 8:31 PM
#9 it is not needed to get equipment for conferencing to help with interpreting. The calls take place over an excellent phone line so nothing else should be needed.
Nick Cheripka's comment, April 4, 2014 8:34 PM
#10. The security of this program is phenominal so you are 100 confidential. How this works is each client and interpreter gets a unique access code which only the client and interpreter knows. So it helps make your phone calls wire tapping proof.
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Language interpreters record sessions using Skype and phones | Evoca Main

Spoken language interpretation professionals, instructors, and students record business and practice sessions using Evoca's Skype and phone recording service.
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Nick Cheripka's comment, April 3, 2014 10:22 AM
Professionals and students, can record and teach on skype. and can also record there business on skype too and there phone recording serivce also. To there benefit.
Nick Cheripka's comment, April 3, 2014 10:24 AM
#3
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Interpreting American Sign Language | National Association of the Deaf

Interpreting American Sign Language | National Association of the Deaf | ASpect2&3 | Scoop.it
So you’re thinking of becoming an interpreter! That’s good, because there’s always a demand for skilled interpreters who can sign fluently and read another person’s signing well.
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Nick Cheripka's comment, March 7, 2014 10:16 AM
#9 prospective interperts will have there sign language skills tested. to improve to there skills they are incouraged to take classes. or to make your skills even better practice with deaf people in general.
Nick Cheripka's comment, March 7, 2014 10:21 AM
#10 people who are deaf need a good interpreter whos qualified and knows what they are doing. a good interperter is one who can translate and understand good. interpreters who struggle with these are not good interpreters for the deaf.
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The Foreign Languages Spoken in Every Single U.S. City

The Foreign Languages Spoken in Every Single U.S. City | ASpect2&3 | Scoop.it
The times, they are a-changin'.

Courtesy of Alexandr Trubetskoy, this map shows the most prominent languages spoken across the continental United States besides English or Spanish.

Seventy-eight percent of the population speaks English at home, leaving 22% with another language as the primary method of communication. Spanish comes in at a healthy second, with 14% of Americans speaking it at home. The remaining 8% comprises 23 million people, split into many different linguistic groups and often in enclaves throughout the nation. The map shows where these enclaves tend to be located.

Unsurprisingly, Chinese-speaking homes are largely clustered on the West Coast, but maintain a healthy presence throughout the mid-Atlantic and Northeast as well. There's also a large Vietnamese-American population in Texas, particularly in Houston, thanks to the resettlement of refugees in the area after the Vietnam War and subsequent increased immigration. Other language hotspots include large numbers of French-speaking Louisianans and French Creole speakers across Florida. German-speaking households are scattered across the country, likely reflecting Hutterite, Amish and Older Mennonite communities.

 
Via Charles Tiayon
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Charles Tiayon's curator insight, March 2, 2014 2:56 PM

Courtesy of Alexandr Trubetskoy, this map shows the most prominent languages spoken across the continental United States besides English or Spanish.

Seventy-eight percent of the population speaks English at home, leaving 22% with another language as the primary method of communication. Spanish comes in at a healthy second, with 14% of Americans speaking it at home. The remaining 8% comprises 23 million people, split into many different linguistic groups and often in enclaves throughout the nation. The map shows where these enclaves tend to be located.

Unsurprisingly, Chinese-speaking homes are largely clustered on the West Coast, but maintain a healthy presence throughout the mid-Atlantic and Northeast as well. There's also a large Vietnamese-American population in Texas, particularly in Houston, thanks to the resettlement of refugees in the area after the Vietnam War and subsequent increased immigration. Other language hotspots include large numbers of French-speaking Louisianans and French Creole speakers across Florida. German-speaking households are scattered across the country, likely reflecting Hutterite, Amish and Older Mennonite communities.

Nick Cheripka's comment, March 4, 2014 10:26 AM
#4 about 78 percent speak english on there property . which means 22 percent speak a different language as the prime. spanish is the 2nd most popular language spoken. with a 22 percent of primary users.
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Why Sign Language Interpreting is indeed Satisfying » Scope Articles

Why Sign Language Interpreting is indeed Satisfying » Scope Articles | ASpect2&3 | Scoop.it

A sign language is one thing which is used as a means involving communication between people who find themselves hard of listening to or deaf and should not speak. They use hands signals, facial movement, gestures, etc to effectively communicate with the other person or with people associated with other nationalities or even regions.

Sometimes, people who are not disabled likewise use sign languages. For example in instances where they can’t talk aloud like in places associated with religious worship, throughout hospitals, in public your local library, in a recording business or during hunting, people resort to using sign languages.
Sign languages have a set of guidelines just as any other language. These kind of rules include the syntax. Sign languages vary depending on the area and country. Every area and every country have sign language interpreter professionals who conserve the handicapped communicate quite easily.
Sign language interpreting is a commendable profession which is also satisfying. A deaf man or woman may need the help of these kind of interpreters when they have to communicate with individuals from another location or nation. Since the sign languages vary from place to place, they will seek the services of interpreters that are proficient with both languages.


Via Charles Tiayon, Julie Judd
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Nick Cheripka's comment, March 3, 2014 10:27 AM
#2 sign language has its set of rules. sign language varies in each country.each country has there own interpreters for there own form of sign language.
Nick Cheripka's comment, March 4, 2014 10:05 AM
#3 sign language is a helpful career to partake in. a person who is deaf may need your help to help translate for them. but since sign language is different in ever country of region deaf people will seek sign language interpreters in there area.
Nick Cheripka's comment, March 5, 2014 10:10 AM
#5 sign language is a way to communicate with the deaf. facial expressions, hand gestures, and movements are means of communication to the deaf. This is also the same for deaf people in different regions to communicate easily.
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Sky Translations - Interpreting

Sky Translations - Interpreting | ASpect2&3 | Scoop.it
SKY
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Nick Cheripka's comment, April 4, 2014 10:27 AM
#4.Using Skype for interpreters can let people communicate even when they arn't in the same room. Or they can use the telephone line. or they can just skype using video chat.
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Skype Offers Interpreting Service In 150 Languages - Network Computing

Skype Offers Interpreting Service In 150 Languages - Network Computing | ASpect2&3 | Scoop.it
Skype has teamed up with two firms to provide an interpreters service in more than 150 languages for callers using the VoIP service.
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Nick Cheripka's comment, March 25, 2014 10:06 AM
1. skype and a couple firms set up more then 150 langauges for interpreters using the voip. this service is avalable for anytime for only 2.99.
Nick Cheripka's comment, March 25, 2014 10:11 AM
2# according to the companies in charge. a LLS person can be on the phone in minutes. LLS interpreters uses Voxeos to transfer there calls.
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‘They don’t have a voice without interpreters’: sign language programs cut at Lakeland College

‘They don’t have a voice without interpreters’: sign language programs cut at Lakeland College | ASpect2&3 | Scoop.it
Many in Alberta’s deaf community believe a move by one of Alberta’s colleges could end up with their basic human rights being violated – after news that Lakeland College is cutting a number of programs, including sign language studies, was released.
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Nick Cheripka's comment, March 6, 2014 10:30 AM
#8 9 schools are not accepting any more students in there facilities . however the deaf community is more concerned about 2 other programs which are american sign language and deaf culture studies.
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Sign Language Interpreting

Sign Language Interpreting | ASpect2&3 | Scoop.it
Sign language interpreters, service providers and educators will be familiar with American texts on the sign language interpreting profession, which make excellent reading and worthwhile teaching resources.

Via Julie Judd
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Nick Cheripka's comment, March 3, 2014 10:21 AM
#1 people who are sign language interperters will be able to identify american texts in there profession. Which will make there reading perfect. and be beneficial with there teaching sources.
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Leadership in Sign Language Interpreting: Where are We?

Leadership in Sign Language Interpreting: Where are We? | ASpect2&3 | Scoop.it
History of Leadership: It is difficult to discuss the history of leadership in the field of sign language interpreting without first selecting a starting point for our history as a “field.” Some consider this point the juncture at which the shift from volunteer interpreter to paid interpreter began, and the time at which training standards and rules of conduct for the practice of sign language interpreting started to become formalized.

Birth of a Field

The juncture at which this shift from volunteer to paid interpreter is most easily identified as June 17, 1964 – the opening date of the Workshop on Interpreting for the Deaf at Ball State Teachers College in Muncie, Indiana. The purpose of this workshop, and later of RID, was

“…to establish standards for interpreters for the deaf; to suggest training, curricula, and criteria for admission to training courses for interpreters; to develop a manual and/or other guidelines for interpreters for the deaf, both for the hearing and the deaf individuals involved; and to collect and identify the manuals and booklets dealing with dactylogy” (Fant, 1989, p.2).

It was at this workshop that two men, and later a total of 64 workshop participants, discussed the idea of forming an organization of interpreters that could also “assess interpreter competency and maintain a registry of them so consumers could be assured of receiving quality service” (Fant, 1989, p.1-2). RID was born as a result, and thus marks our official beginning as a “field.”

Relevant Experience


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Nick Cheripka's comment, March 6, 2014 10:06 AM
#6 before june 17 1964 people wernt getting paid for communicating with the deaf. where this was established was in munice indiana. the reasoning of this convention was to establish a new inerpreting career to help deaf people.
Nick Cheripka's comment, March 6, 2014 10:13 AM
#7 because more and more workers who are getting hired are so young they are lacking in some of there skills. for example no first experince view with deaf people. and with less education on the subjects.