Aspect 2: Evolution of mechanical engineering Aspect 3: future of mechanical engineering
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The Robots That Saved Pittsburgh

The Robots That Saved Pittsburgh | Aspect 2: Evolution of mechanical engineering Aspect 3: future of mechanical engineering | Scoop.it
It’s hard to pinpoint the moment Pittsburgh began its three-decade climb back from the dead, but Red Whittaker marks the comeback from the instant he heard the ominous clack of a door closing behind him when he entered a secured building near the melted heart of Three Mile Island back in 1983. Whittaker—then a ferociously ambitious former...
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Garrett Smith's comment, April 21, 2014 12:50 PM
Lately, some have referred to Pittsburgh as "Roboburgh". Since the Steel City has not been producing steel like it use to, Pittsburgh has needed to be apart of a different trade to reshape its economy and future. "Rapidly growing robotic, artificial intelligence, health technology, advanced manufacturing and software industries." have made this possible, opening endless possibilities for the future of Pittsburgh.
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the future of mechanical engineering | Product Development Notebook

the future of mechanical engineering | Product Development Notebook | Aspect 2: Evolution of mechanical engineering Aspect 3: future of mechanical engineering | Scoop.it
In times of change learners inherit the earth; while the learned find themselves beautifully equipped to deal with a world that no longer exists. First, the doom-and-gloom: I think we are at the beginning of an era of great change […]
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Garrett Smith's comment, March 24, 2014 8:15 AM
Aspect 3: It is believed by some that, in the very near future, mechanical engineering will take a large technological shift. Think about how different technology was 10 years ago, things as simple as checking email and calendars have become so advanced and linked to one another. This may sound very unrelated to mechanical engineering, but in the future, they will be very much linked together. All these things on the internet that modern consumers use became so popular in the first place is because everyone is a consumer. The simple technology that is used to develop these web hits is now also in the hands of mechanical engineers and has set the stage for mechanical engineering revolution.
Garrett Smith's comment, March 26, 2014 7:50 AM
Aspect 3: People who normally dont make software are not making software, which could mean alot for this field. Using an "inexpensive senor" a "3D movement tracking sensor" could be made cheaply. The possibilities are endless when you can make more advanced projects in a shorter amount of time.
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Robots whirr into elderly care - New Zealand Herald

Robots whirr into elderly care - New Zealand Herald | Aspect 2: Evolution of mechanical engineering Aspect 3: future of mechanical engineering | Scoop.it
Robots whirr into elderly care
New Zealand Herald
A future where our elderly have faithful robot servants to look after them might be closer than we think, with the Government offering researchers new cash to push the concept forward.
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Garrett Smith's comment, March 24, 2014 7:46 AM
Aspect 3:Having robots around to help people isn't science fiction any more, the elderly are already being helped by robots in New Zealand today. "The Ministry Business, Innovation, and Employment" has now been partnered with Japan to use "human assistive devices". New Zealand has now taken a first step to the future in using these robots.
Garrett Smith's comment, March 25, 2014 8:04 AM
Aspect 3: Japan has been faced with the problem of having a population growing older. They too, like New Zealand, have looked to robots for assistance. They sick and elderly can now be assisted and monitored by robots that are "wearable heart monitors" and can "constantly check heart rates and temperature."
Garrett Smith's comment, March 26, 2014 8:01 AM
Aspect 3: The healthbot along with the other tasks already mentioned can do much more. Data can be transferred to doctors and care givers on the patients in case something were to go wrong. This is not the robot's only function though. It also can provide "companionship" to the elderly. Now that New Zealand and Japan have teamed up, new extensive research can be done to make improvements.
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Engenius - Engineering makes it happen!

Engenius - Engineering makes it happen!
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Garrett Smith's comment, March 4, 2014 7:52 AM
The word "engineer comes from the Latin word "ingeniator". This name was given to people who built mind boggling devices for the time period, or at least had an idea to do so. Two examples of the first engineers were Archimedes who made the Archimidean Screw, which was a device that was used to raise water from a water source and raise it the land for people to use, and Leonardo Da Vinci. Da Vinci's notebooks indicate that the engineers during this period began to think, "what works and why?".
Garrett Smith's comment, March 4, 2014 7:59 AM
During the industrial revolution, mechanical engineering made a drastic change. With electricity, mass production, more uses for steam and water, etc. designing more highly sophisticated machines became the norm. This is when more disciplines of engineering began to develop as the different tasks required different engineering
Garrett Smith's comment, March 5, 2014 8:18 AM
Engineering today is headed today by many research hours and education. This research has made what people call "the information age" possible, with computers, cell towers, etc. Engineering today is really thought of a science of "creating, explaining, and utilizing manmade systems."
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The Machines of Leonardo Da Vinci and Franz Reuleaux

The Machines of Leonardo Da Vinci and Franz Reuleaux | Aspect 2: Evolution of mechanical engineering Aspect 3: future of mechanical engineering | Scoop.it
This book examines the evolution of machine design methodology from the Renaissance to the Age of Machines in the 19th century. This premise is based in part on the work of da Vinci scholar Ladislo Reti who translated the last discovered work of Leonardo da Vinci in 1967. In the Codex Madrid, Reti found evidence that Leonardo planned to write a book on basic machine elements and compared the great artist-engineer’s drawings to the work of 19th C. machine theorist Franz Reuleaux of Berlin. Reuleaux is credited with classifying the basic elements of machine design and also enumerating six basic classes of mechanisms to change motion from one form to another. Moon’s book carries Reti’s thesis further and provides detailed analysis, comparing design concepts of engineers of the 15th century Renaissance and the 19th century age of machines from a workshop tradition to the rational scientific discipline used today. The design ideas of Leonardo and Reuleaux are placed in the historical, economic and social context of their times. There is also an appendix with a short description of the famous ‘theatre of machines’ books of the 15th to the 18th centuries. This book makes use of the unique collection of 230 kinematic models of Reuleaux at Cornell University. Detailed comparisons of 20 basic machine mechanisms such as the slider crank and four-bar linkages in both Leonardo’s drawings and Reuleaux’s models are made. These models illustrate the elegance and aesthetics of machine design in the 19th century pioneered by Franz Reuleaux. The book hopes to convince the reader that the development of a rational design methodology for machines that grew from the time of Leonardo to the early 20th century was as great a feat as the invention of the machines themselves.
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Garrett Smith's comment, March 5, 2014 8:12 AM
Over the years, many people have asked the question of how mankind was able to make the technologically advanced machines that have been produced. Franz Reuleaux wanted to answer this question as well. This thinking was also very prevalent in the Renaissance era to engineers. Reuleaux wanted to know, is it because the engineers of these machines were a certain race? Or was it because of where they came from? Ultimately he came to the conclusion that these questions were not the answer and the real way to becoming a technologically advanced society "depended on the commitment on that society to educate all it's citizens on the truths of science and the process of rational thought."
Garrett Smith's comment, March 6, 2014 7:51 AM
Realeaux believed that to make an invention, you did not need to be a genius and that there was a process behind making an invention, but he never figured it out. Realeaux believed that a basic knowledge of the machine was needed, it's "machine elements and kinematic mechanisms". New evidence has now emerged that da Vinci too shared similar beliefs to Realeaux's.
Garrett Smith's comment, March 6, 2014 8:04 AM
In our recent history, most parts of the world have become so technologically advanced that "technical endeavors involve the whole world. This creative shift, from the mind of one person to the minds of many, goes back thousands of years. The two major periods in our history where these mechanical engineers really started to emerge were the industrial age and the renaissance.
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Robotics Present State Future Trends - ASME

Robotics Present State Future Trends - ASME | Aspect 2: Evolution of mechanical engineering Aspect 3: future of mechanical engineering | Scoop.it
Contemporary robots are used for jobs that are boring, dirty, or dangerous or for tasks that require more speed, precision, or endurance than a human can provide. The author summarizes the state of robotic R&D worldwide, highlighting U.S. and international organizations and reports. The author also cites projections of future trends in robotics R&D, including networks of robots and a robot theme park in Korea.
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Garrett Smith's comment, March 25, 2014 8:00 AM
Aspect 3:Contemporary robots normally perform jobs that the average person would describe as undesirable, boring, or dirty, although in some cases, they perform tasks that require a speed and precision that no human can offer. They have become huge in the automative industry using their skills to weld, paint, and perform assembly line like tasks. World Robotics reports that their are more than one million industrial robots being used across the country. One can only expect this number to grow in the future.
Garrett Smith's comment, March 26, 2014 7:43 AM
Aspect 3: In 2007, Japan's trade ministry wanted one million robots employed to work by the year 2025. In that same year, 3.5 million jobs are expected to be filled by robots and fix a shortage of the workforce. Japan thinks it will save about $21 billion in the field of insurance because of these robots assisting the elderly.
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What is the Future of Robotics?

What is the Future of Robotics? | Aspect 2: Evolution of mechanical engineering Aspect 3: future of mechanical engineering | Scoop.it
Robots of the next generation will be smart machines which will be integrated into household affairs and production units, due to which enormous assistance will be available to human beings. Memory and brain power of mankind could be enhanced with simple insertions of small robots into the brain
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Garrett Smith's comment, March 24, 2014 8:03 AM
Aspect 3: Many experts believe that by the year 2025, robots will be a huge part of our every day lives. It is believed that they will be able to perform various different "tasks, talk, and will possess aptitude and intellect." Robots being around will be a very normal thing.
Garrett Smith's comment, March 25, 2014 8:11 AM
Aspect 3: Robot surgery can be seen rising over the horizon of our not so distant future. Doctors believe that soon robots will be able to carry out surgeries, diagnosis, and more. This means that a surgery could be quicker and safer for the patient.
Garrett Smith's comment, March 26, 2014 7:55 AM
Aspect 3: Some even believe that robot parts will one day be put into the brain and body to improve our overall conditions of living. Insertions into the brain could improve memory and thought function while improvements to the physical body could be helpful to someone who needs an artificial limb. Very small nano robots could even be released into the blood stream to wash vessels.
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Crossing the Ocean Blue - ASME

Crossing the Ocean Blue - ASME | Aspect 2: Evolution of mechanical engineering Aspect 3: future of mechanical engineering | Scoop.it
At a time when world maps still warned of dragons and sea serpents to the west of Europe and routine fishing trips could become life-and-death affairs, crossing the Atlantic required some advanced engineering.
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Garrett Smith's comment, March 4, 2014 8:17 AM
To last even a day out on the Atlantic Ocean, Columbus' ships would have needed to be engineered to be stronger than any other ships in the world at the time. Actually, each ship was really built for a different purpose, meaning, each ship had it's strong and week points. Historian Mark Gist says,“The Santa Maria was a type called a Nao. The other two ships were Caravels, which was a better ship for a voyage of exploration. The caravels were faster and could sail closer to the wind.”
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Global Sanchez | The History of Mechanical Engineering

Global Sanchez | The History of Mechanical Engineering | Aspect 2: Evolution of mechanical engineering Aspect 3: future of mechanical engineering | Scoop.it
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Garrett Smith's comment, March 5, 2014 7:46 AM
Mechanical engineering emerged as a major field in European Industrial Revolution in the 18th century. The first developers of this field can be traced back to ancient times in several different continents. Their work can be seen throughout medieval and ancient time periods.
Garrett Smith's comment, March 5, 2014 7:57 AM
Different advancements that were made by the Greeks were generally around the time period from 300BC to 150AD. Western civilization had become much more advanced from inventions like, "cranes, screws, odometers, wheelbarrows, parchment, crossbows, torsion catapults" and much more. Watermills, windmills, and steam engines made the Greeks have a highly sophisticated technological culture. Archimedes and Heron of Alexandria were among these famous engineers.
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History of Mechanical Engineering

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Garrett Smith's comment, March 4, 2014 8:08 AM
The very first mechanical engineers date back to as early as the times of the ancient Greeks and Chinese with inventions like, "screw pumps, steam engines, clocks, seismometers, and even differential gears..." Later in the middle ages, "Chain drives, escarpments, crankshafts, and camshafts" started to emerge from the minds of mechanical engineers. After SIr Isaac Newton stated his three laws of motion and invented calculus, it opened the door to making more advanced machines.