Aspect 2: Easier Melanoma Detection Aspect 3: Lab Grown Organs
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Growing Organs in the Lab

Growing Organs in the Lab | Aspect 2: Easier Melanoma Detection Aspect 3: Lab Grown Organs | Scoop.it
Why transplant an organ when you can grow yourself a new one?



This research isn't something that might happen in the distant future.  It's being
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Kasey Verdone's comment, March 26, 2014 9:24 AM
(A3) 9. Growing a new organ is much more desirable than having a transplant. This is the science of today. This research is being used to grow new organs, which are used to aid the study of diseases and the immune system, as well as diminish the number of organ transplants that are necessary. Organ creating science labs throughout the country have had big discoveries recently. The field of tissue engineering is growing fast.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 26, 2014 12:17 PM
(A3) 10. There have been a few well known types of lab grown transplants so far. One of the only full lab grown organs to be transplanted so far is a bladder, but lots of organ parts have been made. Growing skin cells is common. Also, when disease strikes a windpipe, it can be replaced with a lab grown part. Knee cartilage also easily can be grown and transplanted now.
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More patients getting lab-grown body parts

More patients getting lab-grown body parts | Aspect 2: Easier Melanoma Detection Aspect 3: Lab Grown Organs | Scoop.it
What if you could grow a custom-made organ in a lab?
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Kasey Verdone's comment, March 25, 2014 8:52 AM
(A3) 3. In an ideal situation, donors would offer blood or other cells for research. Then, scientists would use those cells to create more identical to those, which could be used to build organs that would fit the needs of an individual's body. Dr. Ott of a Massachuetts general hospital explains that it is possible to regenerate damaged organs, therefore organs can also be grown and inserted surgically into a patient, almost like when someone donates an organ.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 25, 2014 8:55 AM
(A3) 4. Lungs and livers are still far scientifically from being lab grown. Similar parts such as vessels can be though. A synthetic windpipe was created for a girl in Illinois recently. Some of her own bone marrow was used to grow the windpipe. There have been over a dozen medical procedures like to be done so far.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 25, 2014 9:00 AM
(A3) 5. Lab growing human parts is becomming standard in some medical areas. Using a patient's cells, surgeons can repair knee cartilage. Also, burn victims are often given lab grown skin to replace the missing or damaged parts of their own.
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Saluja Features Newest Melanoma Detection Device |

Saluja Features Newest Melanoma Detection Device | | Aspect 2: Easier Melanoma Detection Aspect 3: Lab Grown Organs | Scoop.it
Anita Saluja, MD, of MIMA Dermatology, has acquired the latest technology to detect melanoma – the most dangerous type of skin cancer and the leading cause of death from skin disease.
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Kasey Verdone's comment, March 6, 2014 9:34 AM
1. MelaFind is a very intricate, hand-held device meant for use by dermatologists. It is used to help them decide whether or not they should remove an abnormal mole from a patient due to possible melanoma. Dr. Saluja of dermatology says that she is very excited to have this new device in her office. She also says that anyone can get melanoma, so it is important for dermatologists to have this type of technology available so that they can find melanoma and treat it while it is still in a treatable condition.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 6, 2014 9:35 AM
2. MelaFind uses computer vision technology to gather information from as deep as 2.5 mm into a patient's skin in a noninvasive, painless manner. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration did approve MelaFind after the device proved that it is effective and safe during a large clinical melanoma detection trial. MelaFind was also approved in Europe.
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Lab Grown Custom Organs: The Future of Medicine Is Here

Lab Grown Custom Organs: The Future of Medicine Is Here | Aspect 2: Easier Melanoma Detection Aspect 3: Lab Grown Organs | Scoop.it
Many times it happens that you lose a loved one due to the unavailability of organ donors. But what if dying patients waiting for an organ transplant could get a custom, lab-grown replacement rather than waiting for a donor organ. Yes, the advances in the field of regenerative medicine have made this possible. And now…
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Kasey Verdone's comment, March 25, 2014 9:05 AM
(A3) 6. Waiting for an organ donor is not always a fast enough solution for patients in need. The availability of lab grown replacement organs would save so many lives. This is now becoming possible due to regenerative medical science.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 25, 2014 9:20 AM
(A3) 7. It is an important thought to use the patient's own cells to create the organ they need rather than being dependent on a donor because then there isn't a need and waiting list for a direct match. There is also a possibility that the patient's body will reject the new organ/tissues of the donor. Doctors analyze both the patient and the donor carefully and use drugs to prevent this type of rejection, but sometimes the patient's immune system reacts too strongly. Lab grown organs take away the need for the immune suppressing drugs that could harm the individual due to side effects.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 25, 2014 9:32 AM
(A3) 8. Before the 1980s, most scientists believed growing human organs would be impossible, as it was difficult to grow human cells in a lab. The human body uses chemicals called growth factors to proceed with cellular growth. Once scientists discovered this information, the idea of growing human organs became much more real. In 1996, a North Carolina science lab built a bladder, and since then scientists have been working to make more complex organs.
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MelaFind®: A Tool to Help Detect Melanoma at its Most Curable Stage

MelaFind®: A Tool to Help Detect Melanoma at its Most Curable Stage | Aspect 2: Easier Melanoma Detection Aspect 3: Lab Grown Organs | Scoop.it
MelaFind® is a tool for dermatologists to help detect melanoma at its most curable stage.
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Kasey Verdone's comment, March 6, 2014 9:35 AM
3. Mela Sciences is a medical research company that specializes in making devices that are non-invasive to and helpful to dermatologists who are examining melanoma skin cancer patients. MelaFind is their biggest product. It is for use by dermatologists to help decide whether an abnormal looking mole on a patient should be removed or not, due to the possibility of melanoma. The FDA has finally approved Mela Sciences to release the MelaFind device into U.S. health facilities.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 6, 2014 9:38 AM
4. Melanoma is the most fatal type of skin cancer. 75% of people who die from skin cancer have melanoma. It is estimated that every year in the U.S. there are 130,000 more people diagnosed with this disease. For women between the ages of 25 and 29 years old, melanoma is the most common cancer. For women aged 30 to 35, melanoma kills more of them than any other cancer. If a patient is diagnosed with melanoma in an early stage, the chances of being cured are almost definite, but there is no 100% cure for cancer, especially not in later stages.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 6, 2014 9:38 AM
5. A common cause of melanoma is over-exposure to sunlight, which makes certain skin pigment cells grow uncontrollably. Melanoma often grows in the form of an odd-looking, yet benign mole. Unfortunately, there is a possibility that the cellular growth underneath may not be right.
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MelaFind – Skin Cancer Detection Gets Easier

MelaFind – Skin Cancer Detection Gets Easier | Aspect 2: Easier Melanoma Detection Aspect 3: Lab Grown Organs | Scoop.it
A new device designed to detect melanoma skin cancer has been approved by the FDA but is MelaFind more than just a $7500 gadget or could it replace dermatologists?
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Kasey Verdone's comment, March 6, 2014 9:39 AM
8. There were several studies done to determine how capable the MelaFind device is when assessing melanoma. In a 1400 patient, 1600 melanoma region study, the MelaFind was able to identify 98.4% of the cancerous areas. The average equipment used by dermatologists today is only 78% accurate.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 6, 2014 9:40 AM
9. MelaFind supporters are hopeful that approval of the device could help many skin cancer patients catch the disease as early as possible to make treatment more likely to be successful. There are at least 70,000 estimated cases of melanoma this year in the united states. It is predicted that 10,000 of those people will die due to the cancer. After resolving certain issues involving MelaFind, this device could become a routine part of melanoma testing. Unfortunately, the lack of capability for MelaFind to detect uncommon subtypes of melanoma could cause problems, therefore that among other problems will continue to be assessed. Overall, the idea is that MelaFind will hopefully help doctors to detect skin cancer earlier than current technology.
Kasey Verdone's comment, March 6, 2014 9:40 AM
10. MelaFind is a small, yet complex device to detect harmful melanoma as early as possible to improve a patient's chances of having treatment be successful. It has a scanner which contains diagnostic-imaging algorithms that are used to predict the gradual worsening of an affected region of the body. Critics want doctors to still use their own judgement though when diagnosing melanoma instead of relying heavily on the scanner. They also want the device to only be available to trained dermatologists.