Aspect 1: The Evolution of Catholicism
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Aspect 1:  The Evolution of Catholicism
The exploration of how Americans have responded to Catholic history, papal changes, and the protestant break.
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50 Years Ago, Vatican II Changed The Catholic Church -- And The World

50 Years Ago, Vatican II Changed The Catholic Church -- And The World | Aspect 1:  The Evolution of Catholicism | Scoop.it
(RNS) Fifty years ago on Thursday (Oct. 11), hundreds of elaborately robed leaders strode into St. Peter's Basilica in a massive display of solemn ecclesiastical pomp.
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Sydney Pribanic's comment, March 14, 2013 10:31 AM
Bishop Aymond also said "The church, by its teaching an dby its discipleship, has something to say to the world. At the same time, the world is saying something to the church. We can't just say we're not gonig to be involved in these conversations. As the church, we have to be in conversation with others who agree and disagree with us." This was specifically speaking of the Catholic Church's antagonism about contrary religious beliefs. People of the Catholic faith could not even go to another denomination's church.
Sydney Pribanic's comment, March 15, 2013 10:01 AM
Vatican II also changed the opinion of the Catholic Church on Judaism. With the Vatican II came the acceptance of the Jewish roots to God. Without this change, perhaps the Catholic Church would have stuck with the belief that "Jews were stigmatized as the people who killed Jesus Christ."
Sydney Pribanic's comment, March 15, 2013 10:07 AM
Although the Vatican II was revolutionary, people thought there was not enough done about the rankings of women in the church. The "Vatican orthodoxy watchdog" investigated a group of nuns saying that the nuns were against the church's word and supporting "radical feminist themes." According to a theologist at Notre Dame Seminary (Baglow), "Vatican II isn't about replacing what the church is. It's about helping it be more vitally what God intended it to be in the first place."
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The Roman Catholic Church

The Roman Catholic Church | Aspect 1:  The Evolution of Catholicism | Scoop.it
The Roman Catholic Church was virtually the only Christian church in the former Western Roman Empire until the Protestant Reformation.
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Sydney Pribanic's comment, March 23, 2013 12:11 PM
Adherent participation in the church was eventually discouraged because it went against hierarchy teachings. Mid-nineteenth century priests were given more power. People did not insert themselves into the political atmosphere because of the priests' influence. Catholic parishes had to protect the followers because they did not want to provoke protestants. The only times the priest did not have total power is if the parish did not accept him because of his different ethnic background.
Sydney Pribanic's comment, March 23, 2013 12:45 PM
With John F. Kennedy's election into the United States presidency came both Catholic influence in policy and worry from protestants. Discrimination against Catholics was no longer felt by the protective bishops. The Pope John XXIII backed the Catholics in their "social and political platform." The Vatican II also supported the America Catholic's political beliefs
Sydney Pribanic's comment, March 23, 2013 12:50 PM
Non-Catholics in America feared the Catholic influence during the Kennedy presidency. They believed the pope would have a say in American policy. In an effort to dissipate this fear, in 1960 John F. Kennedy gave a speech to the Greater Houston MInisterial Association in which he said, "I believe in America where the separation of church and state is absolute; where no Catholic prelate would tell the president-should he be Catholic-how to act, and not Protestant minister would tell his parishioners for whom to vote..." This did not rid America of all it's fear, however.
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The Catholic Church in Colonial America by Dr. Marian T. Horvat

The Catholic Church in Colonial America by Dr. Marian T. Horvat | Aspect 1:  The Evolution of Catholicism | Scoop.it
Anti-Catholicism in the original thirteen colonies, Catholics in the colonial period
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Sydney Pribanic's comment, March 23, 2013 1:26 PM
The laws, preachings, and books put out between 1645 and 1763 show the hatred for Catholics. It went so far that in May 1647 Massachussetts Bay enacted a law even though no known Catholics lived there. The law stated "All and every Jesuit, seminary priest, missionary or other spiritual or ecclesiastical person made or ordained by any authority, power or jurisdiction, derived, challenged or pretended. from the Pope of See of Rome." When Georgia was chartered in 1732 it was given religious freedom by King George II, except for Catholics.
Sydney Pribanic's comment, March 23, 2013 1:29 PM
In Pennsylvania specifically, William Penn had tolerance. In 1701, Pennsylvania governed a religious tolerance for everyone who believed in God. WIlliam Penn's distrust of the Catholic religion had bad effects. New doctrines indirectly took away the Catholic right to be politically involved because of their "dangerous" connections to the pope. However, no specific rules completely prevented Catholics from anything like there were in other states. In Pennsylvania the Catholic Church prospered compared to in other states.
Sydney Pribanic's comment, March 23, 2013 1:29 PM
In Pennsylvania specifically, William Penn had tolerance. In 1701, Pennsylvania governed a religious tolerance for everyone who believed in God. WIlliam Penn's distrust of the Catholic religion had bad effects. New doctrines indirectly took away the Catholic right to be politically involved because of their "dangerous" connections to the pope. However, no specific rules completely prevented Catholics from anything like there were in other states. In Pennsylvania the Catholic Church prospered compared to in other states.