Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s)
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Media Arts Watch Lab - www.arts-numeriques.info - laboratoire de veille Arts Numériques - twitter @arts_numeriques - @processing_org - @DigitalArt_be - by @jacquesurbanska @_Transcultures
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Reactive Books (1995 to 1999) /// John Maeda // #mediaart

When I was just starting out in 1992 to create interactive, or reactive as I dubbed them, graphics, there was a great deal of CD-ROM-based content emerging that seemed to miss the point of computational media.

 

With the digital media publisher Digitalogue, I created 4 books (the 5th never made it to print) that focused upon different aspects of the computer as related to the visual medium. 

 

maedastudio.com/2004/rbooks2k/index.php?this=reactive_books

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A Pioneering Net Artist Mourns the Unfulfilled Promise of the Internet by Carey Dunne

A Pioneering Net Artist Mourns the Unfulfilled Promise of the Internet by Carey Dunne | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

For the past decade, along with fellow former members of the late hacker-net artist collective Free Art & Technology (FAT) Lab, American artist Evan Roth has been “dedicated to enriching the public domain one mutha-fuckin LOL at a time,” as the collective writes in their mission statement. Roth’s net art stunts have includedamassing a GIF army to Occupy the Internet; hacking his internet cache to create digital “self-portraits;” fooling the Google algorithm into making his name the number one search result for “bad ass mother fucker,” and creating a browser plug-in that erases Justin Bieber from the internet.

 

But in recent years, especially in the wake of the NSA spying scandal, Roth has found himself disillusioned with the “monetization, commercialization, and centralization of the internet,” as he tells Hyperallergic....

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Harold Cohen, a Pioneer of Computer-Generated Art, Dies at 87 / #mediaart

Harold Cohen, a Pioneer of Computer-Generated Art, Dies at 87 / #mediaart | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Harold Cohen, an abstract painter who developed Aaron, one of the first and eventually one of the most complex computer software programs for generating works of art, died on April 27 at his home in Encinitas, Calif. He was 87.

The cause was congestive heart failure, his son, Paul, said.

Mr. Cohen was a painter growing weary with the traditional practice of art in the late 1960s when he taught himself, out of curiosity, how to program a computer. ...

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The Interior of #NetArt | Josephine Bosma (2002)

The Interior of #NetArt | Josephine Bosma (2002) | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

The question of how to exhibit net art came up strongly in 1997. It became clear that some works were actually interesting for a traditional, offline art audience. In the beginning it seemed that exhibiting net art in a physical space was an anomaly, something contradictive to the nature and background of the attitude from which net art sprung. The online communities a lot of net art came out of refused to think of solutions for physical exhibitions, like they also found it very difficult (with some exceptions) to find a way to deal with question how to sell a net art work.

 

When I was approached by one of the net communities' most notorious members Frederic Madre to write a text for a tongue in cheeck woman's magazine I decided therefore to write a piece that was half satire half serious about how to deal with net art. In some sense one could say the text is metaphorical. By ridiculing the style of the average woman's magazine I compare the desire to own any art work (and also to exhibit it) to certain bourgois tendencies to use art in a semi-decorative way. We could ask ourselves whether our desire to own and present an art piece is ultimately more then a wish to exhibit our own cultural awareness in a fashionable way, like the American artist Cary Peppermint jokes in this text. The intangibility of most new media art and the impossibility to set limits to certain works force us having to face what exactly it is we want from art. Many do want something of art that seems missing: something to surround oneself with. Let's dive into the interior design of net art.

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Laurie Spiegel's Machine Music - pioneer's groundbreaking work with computers in the 70s... #soundart

Laurie Spiegel's Machine Music - pioneer's groundbreaking work with computers in the 70s... #soundart | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

The experimental pioneer's groundbreaking work with computers in the 70s and 80s helped lay the foundation for many of today's electronic noise makers.


Probably the most remarkable thing about Laurie Spiegel is that a piece of music she made could be the first sound of human origin to be heard by extraterrestrial lifeforms. If aliens exist, of course. And assuming they have ears.  

Spiegel's computer realization of a composition conceived back in the early 17th Century by the German astronomer Johannes Kepler is the opening cut on the Golden Record, a disc that accompanied both Voyager probes on their journey across the solar system and out into the great interstellar beyond in 1977.

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Crystall: Russian media art from the 1960s (project by Natalia Fuchs) | Ars Electronica Blog

Crystall: Russian media art from the 1960s (project by Natalia Fuchs) | Ars Electronica Blog | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

With his light organ, the Russian artist Bulat Galeev has already experimented in the 1960s with the interplay of art and science. The musical instrument has now brought back to life by Natalia Fuchs, curator of the Polytech.Science.Art Week.


USSR 1964. Nikita Khrushchev’s last days as party and government chief in Moscow are numbered. Meanwhile, in Kazan, a large city lying 800 kilometers eastwards, the 24-year-old media artist Bulat Galeev designs a light organ of a special kind. More than 50 years later, “Crystall” was brought back to life by Natalia Fuchs and her team. In the course of the Polytech.Science.Art Week, which took place in Moscow in December 2015 at the Polytechnical Museum, this audio-visual musical instrument was presented again. Manuela Naveau of Ars Electronica Export spoke with the curator Natalia Fuchs about “Crystall” and the influence of Bulat Galeev and thereby also got an insight into the Polytech.Science.Art Week, dedicated to interdisciplinary collaboration between art, science and technologies with workshops, discussions, lectures, audio-visual performances and a final exhibition...

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Epizoo - interactive performance by Marcel·li Antunez Roca (1994) // #mediaart

"The Epizoo performance enables the spectator to control Marcel.Lís body by means of a mechatronic system. This system comprises a body robot, which is an exoskeleton worn by the performer, a computer, a mechanical body control device, a vertical projection screen, two vertical lighting rigs and sound equipment.

"The orthopaedic robot mechanism is held to the body by two metal moulds, a belt and a helmet, into which the pneumatic mechanisms are fitted. These mechanisms can move Roca's nose, buttocks, pectorals, mouth and ears while the artist remains standing upright on a rotating circular platform during the performance. The pneumatic devices are in turn connected to a system of computer controlled electro valves and relays. An exclusive application with an interface similar to a videogame is run by the computer. Its eleven interactive scenes include several computer generated animated sequences that recreate the figure of the artist and indicate the position and movement of the mechanisms. In this way the user can control the lighting, images and sound as well as the artist's body by using the mouse." Sergi Jordá composed the music and was responsible for the computer design.


http://www.marceliantunez.com

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Fred Forest. Médias en partage | Espace Virtuel du Jeu de Paume - 28.04 > 10.2015

Fred Forest. Médias en partage | Espace Virtuel du Jeu de Paume - 28.04 > 10.2015 | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Pionnier des nouveaux médias, défenseur d’une approche sociale de l’art et critique infatigable du pouvoir institutionnel, Fred Forest a développé depuis la fin des années 1960 ce qu’il nomme une « pratique sociologique interventionniste » à la croisée de la technologie et du champ social. « J’ai toujours considéré, écrit-il en 1985, le terrain de l’activité sociale comme le champ qui pourrait être élargi et exploré à l’aide des nouvelles technologies de communication. » Dans ses diverses actions artistiques, il a utilisé la vidéo, la radio, la télévision et, plus tard, Internet non seulement pour enregistrer et étudier les relations sociales mais aussi comme des outils d’animation et de dialogue capables de les transformer.

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Olia Lialina: Vernacular Web 2 (2007)

Olia Lialina: Vernacular Web 2 (2007) | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Two years ago I wrote an article titled “A Vernacular  Web”, in which I tried to collect, classify and describe the most important elements of the early Web – visual as well as acoustic – and the habits of first Web users, their ideas of harmony and order.

I’m talking about everything that became a subject of mockery by the end of the last century when professional designers arrived, everything that fell out of use and turns up every now and again as the elements of “retro” look in site design or in the works of artists exploring the theme of “digital folklore”: the “Under Construction” signs, outer space backgrounds, MIDI-files, collections of animated web graphics and so on.
 
If you are missing the way pages looked before, you should install The Timemachine Firefox Add-on by Tobias Leingruber.

And today, in the end of June 2007, when we hear of amateur culture more often than ever before, the cultural influence of “Welcome to My Home Page” web pages looks especially interesting. People who created them and their ideas of what the Web is, how it can be used and how the pages should look, these people’s likes and mistakes gave the today’s Web its current shape. ...

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EVE Extended Virtual Environment - Jeffrey Shaw, ZKM. 1993 - #mediaart #pionneer

EVE is a research and development project initiated at the ZKM Karlsruhe in cooperation with the Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe. It encompasses the conceptual and technical development of a new form of interactive immersive visualisation environment and virtual-reality apparatus.


In the centre of a large inflatable dome, two video projectors are mounted on a motorised pan/tilt device (e.g. robot arm) which can move the projected image anywhere over the inside surface of the dome. The two video projectors present a stereo pair of images - the viewers wearing polarising spectacles can see the projected imagery in three dimensions.


One of the visitors to EVE wears a helmet (or a ‹miner's lamp›) with an attached spatial tracking device that identifies the position and angle of his head. This controls the positioning of video projectors so that the projected image always follows the direction of the viewer's gaze. In this way the viewer can move the picture frame over the entire dome surface and interactively explore the computer-generated virtual scenographies which are presented there. A joystick also allows the viewer to control his forwards and backwards movement in the surrounding virtual space.


In 1993 (MultiMediale 3, ZKM Karlsruhe, Germany), ‹The Virtual Museum› (1991) was adapted for presentation within EVE. In 1995 (MultiMediale 4, ZKM Karlsruhe, Germany) a new work titled ‹The Telepresent Onlookers› linked the movement of the interior video projectors to a stereo pair of video cameras mounted on another pan/tilt device situated outside the dome. As a result the exterior scene could be reconstituted within the dome, allowing the viewers inside to be vicariously telepresent in the space outside.
Jeffrey Shaw

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Grace Hopper : The Queen of Code (documentary) - #pioneer #COBOL

Grace Hopper devoted her life to bringing computers to the masses at a time when her colleagues assumed the technology was only useful for scientists and the military. Hopper taught software English so everyone could communicate with computers

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Interviews with Natalie Bookchin & Brendan Jackson (2001) - New media, community art, #netart #hacktivism

Interviews with Natalie Bookchin & Brendan Jackson (2001) - New media, community art, #netart #hacktivism | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Natalie Bookchin is active in net.art and activism, and is based at CalArts, California. She is currently participating in a residency at MECAD, Barcelona. She was interviewed by email, by Beryl Graham, January 2001.


Beryl Graham: You've had experience of "hacktivism', and net.art. Would you differentiate them, and if so, how?

Natalie Bookchin: … at times the two practices overlap, but other times they don't. Early net art tended to have an activist bent to it, in part because it emerged in the context of an on-line scene active in the free distribution of information, software and ideas in the face of the imminent commercializing and 'malling' of the net … On the other hand there are hacktivists and net activists who do not see themselves as artists per se, but I would argue that their practices can often be seen as a form of art, in their creative and subversive uses of form and content, and their symbolic, representational and practical work which rubs itself against the commercial and corporate grain....

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Pionniers & Précurseurs - Yamaguchi Katsuhiro : De l'Atelier Expérimental au Centre des Média et Arts Environnementaux par Christophe Charles

Pionniers & Précurseurs - Yamaguchi Katsuhiro : De l'Atelier Expérimental au Centre des Média et Arts Environnementaux  par Christophe Charles | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

En tant qu'artiste, les activités publiques de Yamaguchi Katsuhiro débutèrent avec la création du groupe Jikken Kôbô (Atelier Expérimental) en 1951. Son nom fut choisi par le poète Takiguchi Shûzô, proche de Breton et de Duchamp, qui introduisit au Japon le surréalisme. Le groupe intermédia qui naquit alors rassemblait poètes, compositeurs, créateurs d'éclairages, photographes, peintres, plasticiens et ingénieurs. Leur première œuvre collective fut la réalisation d'un ballet sur le thème du tableau de Picasso "La joie de vivre", lors de l'exposition rétrospective du peintre qui eut lieu au lendemain de la guerre.

Bien qu'il fut intitulé "Atelier Expérimental", la caractéristique des activités de ce groupe fut de se développer sans utiliser de lieu particulier. Dans le Japon de l'après guerre, il était en effet quasiment impossible de posséder un atelier destiné à la création artistique. La condition qui a véritablement présidé la création du groupe fut l'esprit d'expérimentation artistique commun à chacun de ses membres. La communication entre ces artistes s'est poursuivie, et leurs œuvres continuent d'être présentées aujourd'hui. ...

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Two Documentaries Introduce Delia Derbyshire, the Pioneer in Electronic Music // #soundart

Two Documentaries Introduce Delia Derbyshire, the Pioneer in Electronic Music // #soundart | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

With her buttoned-up style, work with the UN, and name like a plucky character in a certain English wizard series, Delia Derbyshire may not seem a likely pioneer of experimental electronic music. But her work in the sixties and seventies indeed made her a forerunner of so much contemporary electronic music that most every current legend in the business—from Aphex Twin and the Chemical Brothers to Paul Hartnoll of Orbital, who calls her work “quite amazing” and “timeless”—credits her in some way or another. If you’ve never heard of Derbyshire, you can learn about her life and work in the 2010 BBC Radio 4 documentary above, “Sculptress of Sound.”

...

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The Serious Relationship of Art and Technology by Silka P. and Andrey V.

The Serious Relationship of Art and Technology by Silka P. and Andrey V. | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Both technology and art define and continue to reshape the world we live in. Re-imagining what we know as real or as a solid ground, pushes not only our opinions and understandings of nature to the limits, but with new inventions and experiments, both the mind and the body, the language, and the world itself seems to be making room for a new sphere and new rules. Governed by the new aesthetics, the virtual, the scientific and the logic that is beyond belief, technology in art challenges our perceptions and that is what creativity and science are all about. If we are to understand that art reflects the period of time we are all in, how are we to grasp the growing number of young contemporary artists that base their practice on the presentation of immaterial and ephemeral things? ...

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Petra Cortright: Post-Internet Art in the Social Media Age // by Alicia Eler

Petra Cortright: Post-Internet Art in the Social Media Age // by Alicia Eler | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Petra Cortright was raised in Santa Barbara, but she grew up on the Internet. The Los Angeles-based artist's work is often typified as "post-Internet art," which roughly translates to art that uses the Internet as its medium, source, context and place where it is performed, all at once. It's a mirror and a mindbender. Curators Karen Archey and Robin Peckham define it as: "art, consciously created in a milieu that assumes the centrality of the network, and that often takes everything from the physical bits to the social ramifications of the Internet as fodder... This understanding of the post-Internet refers not to a time 'after' the Internet, but rather to an Internet state of mind -- to think in the fashion of the network."


Oftentimes, Cortright is in her own videos, doing something, but not in a particularly active way. In "snow2???" (2011), the artist sits in her bedroom in front of the webcam, not really doing much. Then hazy glitchy "snow" effects appear on the screen, making this work something between a vlog entry and an experiment with the manipulation options offered by YouTube. Cortright's work is self-conscious, socially anxious, and rather sensitive. It is feminist, without being overtly so, and social, without being extroverted. If we quantified this using a Myers-Briggs pop psychology acronym, it might be something like INFP or INFJ.


Via Sadim M.R.
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Buckminster Fuller - Everything I Know - January 20, 1975

This is a recompiled and edited version of the Bucky videos on Google Video from https://conversationswithbucky.pbworks.com

the videos on that site being too disorganized and poorly edited for my liking. Here all of the blank screens at the end of each tape segment have been removed, and I've recompiled the tape segments back into their original order by session and date.

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Vidéographies 40 ans d'art vidéo / frères Dardenne, Bill Viola, Jacques Charlier, Jean-Claude Riga...

Vidéographies 40 ans d'art vidéo / frères Dardenne, Bill Viola, Jacques Charlier, Jean-Claude Riga... | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Pour célébrer les 40 ans de l’association, Vidéographies présente Vidéographies 4.0, une série de 10 émissions de télévision diffusées sur la Trois, chaque premier samedi du mois (et en VOD).

Vidéographies 4.0 poursuit deux objectifs. Le premier est la valorisation du patrimoine de Vidéographie, l’émission avant-gardiste diffusée de 1976 à 1986. A l’époque, de nombreux artistes sont diffusés par Vidéographie. Parmi eux, on retrouve les frères Dardenne, Bill Viola, Jacques Charlier, Jean-Claude Riga ou encore Jacques Lizène. Devenus figures incontournables de l’art vidéo, Vidéographies 4.0 entend programmer des vidéos et des documents rares. Le second objectif de l’émission est de partager ce qui se fait aujourd’hui d’innovant sur la scène des arts et des nouvelles technologies.


Numéro 1 / Underground
Numéro 2 / Bill Viola


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Suzanne Ciani explain electronic music on 3-2-1 Contact (1980)

Suzanne Ciani (born June 4, 1946) is an Italian American pianist and music composer, who found early success with innovative electronic music.

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The Original Net Artists - by Jordan Pearson on motherboard /// #netart #mediaart

The Original Net Artists - by Jordan Pearson on motherboard /// #netart #mediaart | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it
The artists of Telidon, Canada's doomed pre-internet web.


In 1982, as new wave and queer punk were invading the Toronto music scene, a computer programmer and artist named Bill Perry brought a desk-sized computer to an artist-run video production centre called Trinity Square Video. While the music stuck around, the art created on that computer has been almost completely forgotten.


The computer, made by a company called Norpak, was used to create graphics for a Canadian image transmission protocol called Telidon. The protocol was like a government-funded and corporate-controlled precursor to the graphical web, at least conceptually—and nearly a full decade before Tim Berners-Lee described the world wide web.

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The Early Disruptors: 7 Masterpieces of '90s #NetArt Everyone Should Know About - By Dylan Kerr

The Early Disruptors: 7 Masterpieces of '90s #NetArt Everyone Should Know About - By Dylan Kerr | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Much of the art made today has some kind of digital component, but the movement known as net art—the Internet-based artwork created in the 1990s, the first decade or so of the World Wide Web— still looks radical. Taking to heart early net artist Heath Bunting's credo “do something different,” net artists took advantage of suddenly ubiquitous personal computers and the first user-friendly web browsers to evoke a de-physicalized existence with infinite possibilities. ...

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_Antirom_ - collective formed in 1994 /// explore interactivity

_Antirom_ - collective formed in 1994 /// explore interactivity | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

The Antirom collective was formed in 1994 by a group of Londoners as a protest against "ill-conceived point-and-click 3D interfaces" grafted onto re-purposed old content - video, text, images, audio and so on - and repackaged as multimedia. The members of Antirom felt they could do better than this multi-mediocrity, or at least no worse.


The idea was to explore interactivity and try to understand what made an interactive experience engaging, a simple question but one that proved difficult to resolve. Inspired by Gerald Van Der Kaap's BlindRom, Antirom's eponymous first CD-ROM was a collection of small interactive pieces that were playful, fun, often silly and usually explored only one interactive idea at a time.


See also: http://imal-brussels.tumblr.com/tagged/antirom

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Arthur C. Clarke Predicts the Internet & PC in 1974 (interview)

In1974 Arthur C. Clarke told the ABC that every household in 2001 will have a computer and be connected all over the world. Courtesy of Australian Broadcasting Corporation.

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Archive - Cybersyn, une machine à gouverner le Chili (1970) - par Evgeny Morozov

Archive - Cybersyn, une machine à gouverner le Chili (1970) - par Evgeny Morozov | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it
Google, Amazon et Uber en rêvaient, Stafford Beer l’a fait. Dans les années 1970 au Chili, ce geek barbu et pointu imagine Cybersyn, utopie informatique permettant de gérer toute l’économie d’un pays et d’anticiper les besoins des citoyens depuis une plateforme futuriste.


Evgeny Morozov raconte les origines socialistes du cloud et des big data (et de leur dérive bureaucratique).

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37 videos of Woody & Steina Vasulka (works, interviews - playlist by the New Mexico PBS #mediaart

Steina Vasulka (born Steinunn Briem Bjarnadottir in 1940) and Woody Vasulka (born 1937) are early adopters of video art, having practiced in the genre since its early days in the late 1960s.


Steina was born in Reykjavík, Iceland and trained as a classical musician before receiving a scholarship at the Prague Conservatory in 1959. Woody was born in Brno, now in the Czech Republic and trained as an engineer before studying television and film production at the Academy of Performing Arts in Prague. The couple met in the early 1960s and moved to New York City in 1965, where they pioneered the showing of video art at the Whitney Museum and founded The Kitchen in 1971. Since 1980 they have been based in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

While pursuing his studies in the fifties, Woody Vasulka wrote poetry and produced short films. After arriving in the United States, he began making independent documentaries and also edited industrial films at Harvey Lloyd Productions in New York City.


The following year, at the request of architects Woods and Ramirez, he collaborated on developing films designed for a multi-screen environment to be shown in the American Pavilion at Expo 67 in Montreal. In 1968, Woody Vasulka conducted his first experiments with images made with electronics and put aside cinematographic form in favour of video.


In 2006, a publication Vasulka Lab 1969-2005 was commissioned by Birmingham-based arts organisation VIVID. Fully illustrated Vasulka Lab is an essential document of the Vasulkas' extensive and varied practice. Featuring the Vasulkas in conversation with Don Foresta, essays by Chris Meigh-Andrews and Yasmeen Baig-Clifford, Curator of Vasulka Lab and director of VIVID. ...

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