Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s)
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Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s)
Media Arts Watch Lab - www.arts-numeriques.info - laboratoire de veille Arts Numériques - twitter @arts_numeriques - @processing_org - @DigitalArt_be - by @jacquesurbanska @_Transcultures
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Portrait_de_Louis_XIV.jpg par Bertrand Planes /// #mediaart #artnumerique

Portrait_de_Louis_XIV.jpg par Bertrand Planes /// #mediaart #artnumerique | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Portrait de Louis XIV en costume de sacre.jpg est une nouvelle version de l’oeuvre du même nom du peintre perpignanais Hyacinthe Rigaud. Pour cette copie l’artiste a fourni à un atelier de reproduction chinois exclusivement des éléments trouvés en ligne, la taille du tableau par exemple provient de Wikipedia et le contenu est constitué d’images pixelisées et dégradées glanées sur google image. Certaines erreurs liées à la compression jpeg ont ainsi été reproduites part les copistes.

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Surface, Image, Reception: Painting in a Digital Age By Alex Bacon

Surface, Image, Reception: Painting in a Digital Age By Alex Bacon | Digital #MediaArt(s) Numérique(s) | Scoop.it

Is digital technology the "vampire's kiss that makes painting immortal?"

 

In a sense, painting has always existed in relation to technology, when the term is understood in its broad definition as the practical application of specialized knowledge: the brush, the compass, the camera obscura, photography, or the inkjet printer. However, it is only now that, along the lines of physical presence and a shared role as content-delivery systems, painting is so closely affiliated—morphologically, aesthetically, and conceptually—with the (digital) technologies it engages with. Today both artist and viewer share the experience of digital technologies as familiar, available, and omnipresent. An artist today is automatically involved with ways of looking, thinking, and acting that are conditioned by technology, even if their work is not ostensibly dealing directly with technological concerns. The current conversation between art and technology is thus not necessarily a result of artists appropriating arcane or specialized knowledge, as when in the 1960s they avidly followed, and made use of, the latest innovations published in Scientific American. ...

 

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