Prez playing it slick - Boston Herald | Article 6 , English | Scoop.it

USA TODAYPrez playing it slickBoston HeraldBy Boston Herald Editorial Staff We listened to President Barack Obama's remarks in Nashua on Thursday for any hint of the “official business” that the White House insisted was the reason for the trip.

 

1.  The subject is about president
Obama blaming the oil production for gas rising while sliding by the oil
production problem.

2. The writer presents quotes from
the president saying, “Since I took
office, America’s dependence on foreign oil has gone down every single year.
Every single year.”

“Once
again he left out the part about consumption being squeezed dramatically by the
lousy economy,” the writer adds.
He
repeated the point that he made in Florida last week that gas prices are
subject to forces not entirely within his control, including instability in the
Middle East.
It’s
one of the oldest political tricks in the book — turn a candidate’s weakness
into strength. Make the profitable oil industry take the blame for high gas
prices, distracting voters from the administration’s refusal to take more
action to increase domestic supply of oil and gas.

3. The writer’s opinion is that the voters can’t be this dumb to fall for the
oldest trick in the book about the way to turn a candidate’s weakness into a
strength which is what the president is using to disguise the real problem
about the administration’s refusal to take more action to increase domestic supply
of oil and gas.

4. Yes. “It’s one of the oldest political tricks in the book — turn a
candidate’s weakness into strength. Make the profitable oil industry take the
blame for high gas prices, distracting voters from the administration’s refusal
to take more action to increase domestic supply of oil and gas, while throwing
in a call to strip $4 billion in annual subsidies from oil companies to give it
to government agencies and private companies so they can, say, buy more
fuel-efficient vehicles.”

6. I learned that the writer is clear on his thoughts about the situation with
the president tricks and dumbfounded on the many voters that got caught in the
trickery from the president.

7. This article was written for the adult reader.

8. Yes. I agree with the writer’s notion on the idea of the president’s trickery.
Through the editorial the writer presents things that I agree with such as when
he says “It’s one of the oldest political tricks in the book — turn a
candidate’s weakness into strength. Make the profitable oil industry take the
blame for high gas prices, distracting voters from the administration’s refusal
to take more action to increase domestic supply of oil and gas, while throwing
in a call to strip $4 billion in annual subsidies from oil companies to give it
to government agencies and private companies so they can, say, buy more
fuel-efficient vehicles.” I can see the president’s plan now that the writer
has displayed it. “We’re reminded of the president’s new political mantra of
America succeeding only when everyone gets a “fair shot,” everybody does their
“fair share,” and “everybody is playing by the same set of rules.” Unless you
happen to be an oil company.”

2. The writer incorporates sarcasm within his words in order to get his ideas
through to the reader such as when he talks about the president using the “oldest
tricks in the book — turn a candidate’s weakness into a strength. Make the
profitable oil industry take the blame for high gas prices, distracting voters
from the administration’s refusal to take more action to increase domestic
supply of oil and gas, while throwing in a call to strip $4 billion in annual
subsidies from oil companies to give it to government agencies and private
companies so they can, say, buy more fuel-efficient vehicles.” This causes the
reader to have a thought on how he or she may be being fooled by the president
sly trick. The writer also outs his own attitude in his writing when he says “But
hey, why belabor the wonky stuff when you have twin “evils” to vanquish —
Republicans in Congress and GOP candidates for president with their pesky calls
to increase domestic oil production, and the mean old oil industry gobbling up
all those federal subsidies that could be going to energy start-ups. Like
Solyndra? This also gets the reader to somewhat relate to the attitude sense
the writer is giving and think in favor of the writer.