Article On Chemistry - Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals
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How is Polyvinyl Chloride Made? - World Of Chemicals

How is Polyvinyl Chloride Made? - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
PVC contains high levels (57%) of chlorine content. Manufacturing polyvinyl chloride (PVC) involves 3 steps Ethylene dichloride production, Vinyl chloride monomer production, Polyvinyl chloride production
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IMCD to acquire speciality chemicals business of Bossco

IMCD to acquire speciality chemicals business of Bossco | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it

After completion of the transaction, expected at the beginning of July 2017, the business will be integrated within IMCD US with Edward Boss becoming a senior member of the IMCD management team.

 
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Water treatment chemicals, a modern approach for safe drinking water - World Of Chemicals

Water treatment chemicals, a modern approach for safe drinking water - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it

Chemicals that are used in the process of removal of suspended solids, viruses, fungi, bacteria, algae and minerals are called as water treatment chemicals

 
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Methods of preparation of caustic soda

Methods of preparation of caustic soda | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
6 best industrial sodium hydroxide, caustic soda preparation methods using Castner - Kellener Process, Nelson Diaphragm Cell, Loewig’s process, White liquor oxidation process, Carmichael method, LeSueur’s process
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How does salt lower the freezing point of water? - World Of Chemicals

How does salt lower the freezing point of water? - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Salt mixed with ice creates a brine that has a temperature lower than 32 F; When salt is added to ice water, it lowers melting temperature of ice down to 0 F or so; Brine is so cold that it easily freezes the ice cream mixture
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How to prepare sodium acetate at home? - World Of Chemicals

How to prepare sodium acetate at home? - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Sodium acetate can be made at home using common household ingredients baking soda and vinegar. To begin the reaction, add one spoonful of baking soda to a glass container. Slowly add vinegar, being careful not to create too much foam
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Merck acquires food safety testing company in US

Merck acquires food safety testing company in US | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
The acquisition of BioControl allows Merck to offer its customers complete workflow solutions for food pathogen testing and opens growth opportunities for Merck in the food and beverage space.
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Water and food concerns give rise to Virtual Water - World Of Chemicals

Water and food concerns give rise to Virtual Water - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
water chemistry discusses the concept of virtual water which helps to save lots of sweet water, which can be used for other purpose, as per this new research around 70% of good water as been used for food production
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How is bromine synthesised by laboratory process? - World Of Chemicals

How is bromine synthesised by laboratory process? - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
To make bromine in the laboratory here are few steps we need to follow; we need to find a chlorine source and react it with a solution of bromide ions. After formation of the bromine, it must be separated from the solution in a suitable way
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Chemistry in everyday life

Chemistry in everyday life | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Have you ever wondered why chemistry is so important? Why do we study chemistry? We all are made of chemicals and everything around us is made of chemicals. Everything we hear, see, smell, taste, and touch involves chemistry and chemicals (matter). Hearing, seeing, tasting, and touching all involve intricate series of chemical reactions and interactions in our body. Many of the changes we observe in the world around are caused by chemical reactions. Chemistry is not limited to beakers and laboratories. It is all around us, and the better we know chemistry, the better we know our world. Chemistry is present in every aspect of life, and few examples are
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Chemistry of Enzymes, Polymers

Chemistry of Enzymes, Polymers | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Original name of enzymes is ferments. Enzymes are biomolecules, biocatalysts, complex proteins that drives thousands of metabolic processes in living things. Without enzymes there is no respiration process, digestion processes in animals and no photosynthesis process in plants. Overall enzymes can able to catalyze 4000 biochemical reactions. Enzymes are biocatalysts. Enzymes without being consumed in the process can speed up chemical processes or slow down the chemical processes. After the reaction is complete, the enzyme is released from the chemical process which can start another reaction. They are present in all living cells, where they perform a vital function by controlling the metabolic processes. Moreover, enzymes take part in the breakdown of food materials into simpler compounds. Enzymes like pepsin, trypsin and peptidases break down proteins into amino acids, lipases split fats into glycerol and fatty acids, and amylases break down starch into simple sugars. Enzymes production Enzymes are generally extracted from various sources like plants, animals, bacteria, fungi, and animal organs. The enzymes of animal and plant origin are produced through the disruption of tissues, organs, leaves and fruits. Then enzymes will be extracted with water or organic solvent. In same way microbial enzymes are attained through the process of fermentation. Examples for enzymes Chimosin Pepsin Trypsin Pancreatin Ficin Papain Bromelain Pactinases Glucoamylase Amylase Protease Alpha-amylase Thousands of different enzymes are needed to keep the human body functioning normally, each usually acting on only one kind of substrate, and catalyzing only one kind of reaction. Enzymes are classified according to the type of reaction they catalyze and the type of substrates on which they act. Most metabolic processes involve a series of many different chemical changes. In digestion, for example, separate chemical reactions take place in the mouth, stomach, and intestine. Certain enzymes break down the protein, carbohydrate, and fat molecules of food into smaller molecules. Other enzymes assist in passing these smaller molecules into the bloodstream. History & Discovery of enzymes In 1833 Payen and Persoz isolated enzyme complex from malt In 1874 Christian Hansen extracted dried calves' stomachs with saline solution In 1876 William Kuhne coined the term ‘enzyme’ In 1897 Eduard Buchner studied about zymase action In 1926 James B. Sumner explained function of urease In 1930 Northrop and Stanley worked on pepsin enzyme Structure of enzymes Enzymes are in general globular proteins and range from just 62 amino acid residues in size and all these amino acids linked together. The amino acids within each kind of enzyme have a characteristic arrangement. The bonds between the different amino acids in the chains are weak and may be broken by such conditions as high temperatures or high levels of acids. When the bonds are broken, the enzymes become nonfunctional and disease sometimes occurs. Enzyme Commission number/system For the classification of enzymes one particular method is following by the people i.e., Enzyme Commission System. The Enzyme Commission number (EC number) is a numerical classification scheme for enzymes, based on the chemical reactions they catalyze. EC 1 - Oxidoreductases, catalyzes both oxidation reactions and reduction reactions EC 2 - Transferases, catalyzes transferring of groups EC 3 - Hydrolases, catalyzes hydrolytic cleavage of different bonds EC 4 - Lyases, catalyzes cleavage of bonds EC 5 - Isomerases - catalyzes geometric or structural changes within molecule EC 6 - Ligases - catalyzing the joining of two molecules Applications of enzymes Enzymes for textile industry, enzymes used for textile industry for the purpose of desizing, bio-polishing, denim finishing, bleach clean-up, bio-scouring and de-wooling Enzymes for leather industry - enzymes used for leather industry for the purpose of bating, un-haring, degreasing and soaking in the beam-house processes Enzymes for food industry - enzymes used for food industry for the purpose of food baking and brewing of alcohols Enzymes for detergent industry - enzymes used for detergent industry for the purpose of removing protein stains, fatty stains Enzymes for biofuel industry Enzymes for rubber industry Enzymes for photographic industry Polymers Polymers are high molar mass containing macromolecules and are composed of a large number of repeating units or different types of units. Homopolymers are the polymers contain single type of repeat units. Where as copolymers are the polymers contains mixture of repeat units There are two types of polymers. Natural polymers Synthetic polymers Proteins - it is polymer of amino acids Nucleic acids - it is polymer of nucleotides Starches - it is polymer of glucose Latex is the naturally occurring polymers Ethylene Propylene Polyethylene Polyethylene terephthalate [PETE] Polyvinyl chloride [PVC] Polypropylene [PP] Polystyrene [PS] Poly tetrafluoro ethylene Polyurethane Polyamide Polyacrylamides are synthetic polymers Polymers are the major constitute the basis for diamond, quartz, and feldspar and concrete, glass, paper, plastics, and rubbers. Polymers are formed by chemical reactions in which a large number of molecules called monomers are joined sequentially, forming a chain. In others, two or three different monomers may be joined to form a long chain. Polymers are classified by the characteristics of the reactions by which they are formed. Addition polymers If all atoms in the monomers are incorporated into the polymer, the polymer is called an addition polymer. Most addition polymers are made from monomers containing a double bond between carbon atoms. Such monomers are called olefins. Condensation polymer If some of the atoms of the monomers are released into small molecules, such as water, the polymer is called a condensation polymer. Condensation polymers are made from monomers that have two different groups of atoms which can join together to form. Chemical properties of polymers The attractive forces between polymer chains play a major role in polymer's properties. Polymers side groups determine what types of intermolecular forces will exist. If greater the strength of the intermolecular forces, the greater will be the tensile strength and melting point of the polymer. Different types of bonds exists between polymers are Hydrogen bonds Dipole-dipole bonds Vander waal’s forces
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Chemicals of indelible ink used at bank cash counters

Chemicals of indelible ink used at bank cash counters | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
NEW DELHI. INDIA: On Tuesday 15th Nov 2016, Government of India announced it is going to use indelible ink at the cash counter where the old bank notes of 500 and 1,000 Rupees are being exchanged. The move taken by the Government is very necessary because it has been noticed that the facility of note exchange is being misused by several black money holders. The indelible ink which is utilised here is same as the ink used in Indian Election times, the ink will remain at least for 72 hours once marked on your finger. It helps authorities to figure out the malpractices that is happening everywhere. The ink contains few important chemicals that’ll stick firmly and remains for a prolonged period of time. Silver Nitrate is the chemical which is mixed with black ink solution when the solution is applied on your finger it turns to silver chloride as a result of chemical reaction. Silver chloride once sticks on to your finger cannot be removed so easily and disappears only when external skin cells are replaced. Silver Nitrate reacts with the salt present on your skin after which silver chloride is formed. And, importantly silver chloride is insoluble in water & never dissolves with water or any other solution. The election ink comprises 10 percent, 14 percent or 18 percent silver nitrate solution, the proportion depends on the duration of time the mark is required to be visible. Election ink is sometimes mixed with alcohol for fast drying, and also biocide is blended to ensure the bacteria is not transferred if dipping bottles are used for staining purpose. Usually the election ink is violet in colour, however, it turns to black or brown colour when it comes in contact with the sunlight. In India Mysore Paints and Varnish Limited (MPVL) is the only company that has the authority to make indelible ink. MPVL is a Government of Karnataka undertaking and is situated in the city of Mysore, India. Ministry of finance has approached MPVL asking for the supply of indelible ink with large quantity.
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BASF’s coating solutions comply with emission guidelines in China

BASF’s coating solutions comply with emission guidelines in China | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
BASF’s new coating solutions for wind turbines, meet the current volatile organic compounds (VOCs) guidelines, including the tightened threshold values for use in Beijing, China.
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Boiler water treatment, a supercritical industrial process - World Of Chemicals

Boiler water treatment, a supercritical industrial process - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Boiler water treatment chemicals are the chemicals used in treating the feedwater that are used inside the boilers
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Chinese researchers conduct study on space life science

Chinese researchers conduct study on space life science | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Studying effects of the CKIP-1 gene on bone formation aboard China's first cargo spacecraft, Tianzhou-1
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How do leavening agents make dough rise? - World Of Chemicals

How do leavening agents make dough rise? - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it

Do you know how leavening agents cause a foaming action in doughs & batters? It’s very simple vigorous mixing & incorporating air bubbles, which results from foam formation.

 
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Kimberlite endorses #IWD2017 & shares a post with #BeBoldForChange

Kimberlite endorses #IWD2017 & shares a post with #BeBoldForChange | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
We at kimberlite softwares are constantly on look for young and experienced candidtaes who love to work under dynamic and fast paced environment
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Industrial Production of Diethyl Ether - World Of Chemicals

Industrial Production of Diethyl Ether - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
To make Diethyl Ether Ethanol is mixed with a strong acid like sulfuric acid (H2SO4), this strong acid dissociates in the aqueous environment producing H3O+(hydronium ions)
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Production of ethyl acetate by esterification - World Of Chemicals

Production of ethyl acetate by esterification - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Ethyl acetate is synthesised via the Fischer esterification reaction from ethanol and acetic acid, typically in the presence of an acid catalyst such as concentrated sulfuric acid; check here for more
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Tantalum Carbide – new shielding material for spacecrafts - World Of Chemicals

Tantalum Carbide – new shielding material for spacecrafts - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Tantalum Carbide is a refractive material that can be used in spacecraft shielding; tantalum carbide is very useful material
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Is the air you breathe, safe? - World Of Chemicals

Is the air you breathe, safe? - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Carbon monoxide, Hydrocarbons, Nitrogen oxides, Particulates, Gases from factories are some chemicals or air pollutants found in India, china; some steps that can reduce air pollution
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World Aids Day 2016: 2,000 Proteins Present in HIV Virus

World Aids Day 2016: 2,000 Proteins Present in HIV Virus | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
AIDS stands for: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome.HIV stands for: Human immunodeficiency virus Contains 2000 Proteins . HIV is transmitted primarily via unprotected sexual intercourse (including anal and even oral sex)
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Chemistry of fear | See What Chemical Causes Fear

Chemistry of fear | See What Chemical Causes Fear | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
It’s 12’O clock in midnight! You are alone and watching television in home! Suddenly the front door and windows are thrown against the door frame! You reached the front door to close it and it’s very dark out side! Doors and windows fasten up flopping! In the same time some horror scene coming in television! Then suddenly, Your breath speedup and started shivering!
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Friedrich Hund – discoverer of Hund’s rule - World Of Chemicals

Friedrich Hund – discoverer of Hund’s rule - World Of Chemicals | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Friedrich Hund was a German physicist He did significant work on the structures of atoms and molecules In 1925 Hund discovered ‘Hund's rule of maximum multiplicity’
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Role of Oxalic Acid in Human Body | List of Oxalic Acid Foods

Role of Oxalic Acid in Human Body |  List of Oxalic Acid Foods | Article On Chemistry -  Find Out Chemical Industry Best Articles only at World Of Chemicals | Scoop.it
Oxalic Acid belonging to the family of carboxylic acids and this chemical also termed as Ethanedioic Acid. Oxalic acid is widely used as an acid rinse in laundries, where it can able to remove rust and ink stains because of its capability of converting insoluble iron compounds into a soluble complex ion.For the same reason, it is the chief ingredient of many commercial preparations used for removing scale from automobile radiators. It occurs naturally in high levels in many common foods, including several vegetables like Potatoes, Beets, Broccoli, Carrots and other foods like fruits, nuts&seeds, legumes&grains, Chocolate, Beer etc. In some of these food items, it tastes pleasantly sour, and in others it’s essentially tasteless. Because it binds with some nutrients making them unavailable, for this reason the oxalic acid is often described as an anti-nutrient. We don’t believe oxalic acid poses a health threat if you’re reasonable about your consumption. More than 90 per cent of the oxalic acid you consume is normally excreted in your urine. Organic form of oxalic acid, in low concentration, is essential to maintain peristaltic motion in our body. However, when it is processed or cooked, it becomes inorganic form, and may have certain negative effects on the body. Foods high in both calcium and oxalic acid are less of a concern than those merely high in oxalic acid, since the calcium bonds with the oxalic acid in the stomach. In lower doses, oxalic acid can limiting the absorption of some nutrients, particularly calcium and iron. When oxalic acid combines with calcium and some of these other minerals it creates oxalate crystals, which can contribute to kidney stones, gout etc. Oxalic acid can also interfere with the absorption of minerals in our diet such as calcium, potassium, and magnesium. Hence, it is advisable for people with certain health conditions to limit its intake through the diet. One thing to be kept in mind is that, oxalic acid is harmless if consumed in organic form and moderate amounts. However, too much of it can have several adverse effects on your body.
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