Experimentation and Preservation of the Laetoli Footprints
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International Effort Needed to Protect Important Footprints

International Effort Needed to Protect Important Footprints | Experimentation and Preservation of the Laetoli Footprints | Scoop.it
An international team of advisors is dedicated to creating a museum complex in Tanzania showcasing perhaps the most important collection of hominin footprints in the world today.
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Citation:

"International Effort Needed to Protect Important Footprints." Labratory Equipment. University of Colorado, 16 Oct. 2014. Web. <http://www.laboratoryequipment.com/news/2014/10/international-effort-needed-protect-important-footprints>.

 

This source explains the dangers of not preserving the Laetoli footprints. Author talks about threats to conservation such as Ph of the soil and moisture of the soil and air that can affect the footprints.

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Evidence indicates humans' early tree-dwelling ancestors were also bipedal

Evidence indicates humans' early tree-dwelling ancestors were also bipedal | Experimentation and Preservation of the Laetoli Footprints | Scoop.it
Experiments by anthropologists show that fossil footprints made 3.6 million years ago are the earliest direct evidence of early hominids using the kind of efficient, upright posture and gait now seen in modern humans.
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Citation:

University of Arizona. "Evidence indicates humans' early tree-dwelling ancestors were also bipedal." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 March 2010. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2010/03/100319202526.htm>. ;

 

This article from the University of Arizona provides the reader of experimental evidence showing that Australopithecus afarensis developed the ability of bipedalism while spending most of their time living in trees. Experimental evidence shows imprints modern humans walking in normal upright posture versus imprints of walking like Australopithecus afarensis.

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Ancient footprints show human-like walking began nearly 4 million years ago

Ancient footprints show human-like walking began nearly 4 million years ago | Experimentation and Preservation of the Laetoli Footprints | Scoop.it
Scientists have found that ancient footprints in Laetoli, Tanzania, show that human-like features of the feet and gait existed almost two million years earlier than previously thought.

Via Paulo Furtado
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Citation:

University of Liverpool. "Ancient footprints show human-like walking began nearly 4 million years ago." ScienceDaily. ScienceDaily, 20 July 2011. <www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2011/07/110719194356.htm>.

 

A team of researchers from Liverpoo, University of Manchester and Bournemouth University have shown with new statistical techniques that human-like features of the feet and gait existed almost two million years earlier than previously thought

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Newsletter 12.2 Summer 1997

Newsletter 12.2 Summer 1997 | Experimentation and Preservation of the Laetoli Footprints | Scoop.it
Newsletter feature article examining holistic perspectives on the preservation of archaeological sites.
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Citation:

Agnew, Neville. "Preservation of Archaeological Sites: A Holistic Perspective." The Getty Conservation Institute. Web. 23 Nov. 2014. http://www.getty.edu/conservation/publications_resources/newsletters/12_2/feature1.html

 

This article shows the reader why preservation of Archaeological sites is crucial. It also shows the processes used to ensure preservation for further use such as reductionism and how Archaeologists are taking precautions to ensure that sites are preserved to the fullest extent.

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Newsletter 10.1 Spring 1995

Newsletter 10.1 Spring 1995 | Experimentation and Preservation of the Laetoli Footprints | Scoop.it
Newsletter article describing field campaigns launched to protect fossil hominid footprints at Laetoli, Tanzania.
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Citation:

Agnew, Neville, and Martha Demas. "The Footprints at Laetoli." The Getty Conservation Institute. Web. 20 Nov. 2104. <http://www.getty.edu/conservation/publications_resources/newsletters/10_1/laetoli.html>.

 

 

This article shows the reader of the threats to the Laetoli footprints and explains the course of action that is being taken to ensure that the Laetoli footprints are preserved for future study.

 

 

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